Wood type? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 04-04-2017, 09:02 AM Thread Starter
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Wood type?

Hello,

I purchased lately an old wooden outdoor dining set, the colour is faded and needs TLC, I have started by cleaning it with high pressure water pump, I noticed that the wood looked like it was already painted and I was able to peal it off while spraying, I assumed this was teak wood, now not sure about its value if it worth to continue by sanding it even, wondering if it was teak then why it was painted, also noticed high difference in colour between the wood pieces when it was wet, i.e. one piece looked bright yellow and the one besides looked dark burnt brown, this is after paint was removed, it is heavy, sturdy and still good, I have attached the pictures, perhaps you can hint what is the wood type? it has an FSC label.

These pictures were taken before washing.

Thank you
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post #2 of 10 Old 04-04-2017, 09:31 AM
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Go ahead and sand it and take another picture. The way it looks it could be most anything. More than likely it's one species or another of mahogany.
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post #3 of 10 Old 04-04-2017, 03:01 PM Thread Starter
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I have started with sanding, spent just one hour trying to sand half side of the table only, used 60 grit paper on Skil orbital sander, it will take a great amount of time since it has fissures because the wood is really dry, I am thinking to apply some filler.

I am a beginner, I appreciate the guidance.

Here is the picture after one hour of sanding, with and without camera flash light.
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post #4 of 10 Old 04-04-2017, 04:35 PM
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Might be some version of Philippian "mahogany." Mirranti? (Probably spelled wrong?)
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post #5 of 10 Old 04-04-2017, 07:22 PM
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Hard to say. Could be some variety of lyptus, teak, or something else.
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post #6 of 10 Old 04-04-2017, 08:43 PM
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Looks like Philippine mahogany to me, aka Lauan.
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post #7 of 10 Old 04-05-2017, 01:14 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you, if it is mahogany, is it recommended to just apply teak oil or do I need to paint it with oil based paint? I read about mahogany that it is porous, can it resist outdoor weather?
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post #8 of 10 Old 04-05-2017, 01:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mnakkach View Post
Thank you, if it is mahogany, is it recommended to just apply teak oil or do I need to paint it with oil based paint? I read about mahogany that it is porous, can it resist outdoor weather?
You don't NEED to do one finish or another. It's up to you and that's determined by how it'll be used. If it is mahogany I'd imagine it should hold up just fine outdoors, but I'm definitely no expert. Steve would probably be the wiser person to listen to here. If it stays outdoors I might just do some type of lacquar or spar urethane to protect it and show off that pretty grain, but that's just me... and i'm probably wrong.
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post #9 of 10 Old 04-05-2017, 07:21 AM
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The wood may seem to be dried out but that is very superficial. The sun will dry the surface very badly but just below the surface the wood is new and fresh. The type of wood you are using is very soft anyway.

There are any number of finishes you could use. Each has their own pluses and minuses. An oil finish is simple, easy to use but not very durable. It would be necessary to keep an eye on the furniture and re-treat as often as needed. It would be much easier to let the furniture fall into a state of neglect as it already has.

Another option would be a marine grade spar varnish. A spar varnish would give the furniture a wood tone as the oil finish would but would provide a coating completely keeping water out of the wood for a very long time before it would need attention. Depending on how much sun exposure the furniture gets the finish would eventually dry out and fail. This can be prevented to a point by keeping an eye on the furniture and when the finish begins to look like the finish has developed a flat sheen apply a fresh coat of finish. Still even with routine maintenance the finish will fail and that would involve stripping and refinish to restore. The length of service of the finish can vary greatly depending on the quality of the finish. The best is Epifanes and perhaps the worst is Helmsman. The same process would be the same if paint were chosen. Anything you use you can't just do the job and forget about it. Everything requires maintenance.
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post #10 of 10 Old 04-09-2017, 02:04 AM Thread Starter
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I have completed sanding and 3 coats of teak oil, check the picture and let me know what you think?
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