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Mir Mahmood 02-02-2018 12:37 AM

Wood Feature Wall Question
 
2 Attachment(s)
Hi everyone,

I'd like to make a feature wall in my house with the design attached in this post. From the design you'll see it's long vertical strips of wood spaced about 2 inches apart. For a more bold effect to create depth, I was thinking perhaps I can do this with 2x4's or cut it down to 2x3 (with the longer side protruding out from the wall). Any thoughts on how I can accomplish this and affix the wood to the wall? I don't know if I should use brackets, liquid nails, or something else.

Thank you for your recommendations.

Steve Neul 02-02-2018 07:21 AM

It wouldn't hold very well just glued to drywall. Then it would be a mess to use construction adhesive. The stuff would ooze out the side and with only 2" space it wouldn't leave you much room to clean it up. I would recommend gluing the strips to a sheet of plywood and then attach that to the wall.

TimPa 02-02-2018 08:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve Neul (Post 1873977)
I would recommend gluing the strips to a sheet of plywood and then attach that to the wall.


+1 agree with steve

gj13us 02-02-2018 08:42 AM

You can buy 2x3s (1 1/2" x 2 1/2") at the Big Orange Box and the Big Blue Box, and you wouldn't have to cut 2x4s to size.

Maylar 02-02-2018 09:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gj13us (Post 1874041)
You can buy 2x3s (1 1/2" x 2 1/2") at the Big Orange Box and the Big Blue Box, and you wouldn't have to cut 2x4s to size.

Yeah, but they're gonna be fugly. Framing lumber has knots and voids. I wouldn't use pine at all unless it'll be painted.

Steve Neul 02-02-2018 10:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maylar (Post 1874089)
Yeah, but they're gonna be fugly. Framing lumber has knots and voids. I wouldn't use pine at all unless it'll be painted.

Learn something new every day. Never heard the word fugly before. Had to look it up.

Pineknot_86 02-02-2018 10:45 AM

Construction adhesive would be destructive adhesive. The previous owner of mi casa used Liquid Nails to attach a tool rack on a 2x4 on the block wall. Pulled it off and pulled off chunks of the blocks. Strong stuff!

gj13us 02-02-2018 12:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maylar (Post 1874089)
Yeah, but they're gonna be fugly. Framing lumber has knots and voids. I wouldn't use pine at all unless it'll be painted.

Fair enough. On the other hand, where can someone get 2x4s that aren't framing lumber?

GeorgeC 02-02-2018 02:00 PM

[QUOTE=gj13us;1874321]Fair enough. On the other hand, where can someone get 2x4s that aren't framing lumber?[/QUOT

Just about any lumber yard and many Lowes, Home Depot, etc. If there is nothing like that in your area then there are places like walllumber.com.

George

gj13us 02-02-2018 02:54 PM

[quote=GeorgeC;1874433]
Quote:

Originally Posted by gj13us (Post 1874321)
Fair enough. On the other hand, where can someone get 2x4s that aren't framing lumber?[/QUOT

Just about any lumber yard and many Lowes, Home Depot, etc. If there is nothing like that in your area then there are places like walllumber.com.

George

Pretty sure our HDs and Lowes have 2x only as framing lumber or pressure treated. Everything else is 1x, plus some assorted stuff in 1/2" and 1/4". More recently I saw 5/4 pine and poplar, but not regularly.

Maylar 02-02-2018 03:46 PM

It depends on the look that you want to achieve. And will they be painted or do you want wood grain? And what tools do you have for flattening and straightening stock? And how much are you willing to spend?

shoot summ 02-02-2018 06:02 PM

I think you need to modify your design slightly.

You didn't include any dimensions, but based on the material you described, and what you have pictured that will be about 48" wide, no clue on height.

You also don't indicate what the wall you are attaching to is constructed of, so let's just assume it is a conventional, framed, drywalled home, so studs on 16" center.

You will need some horizontal pieces to hold the vertical pieces together, and to use to mount this to the wall. They should be let into the backs of the vertical pieces at some spacing that makes sense, and isn't distracting from the piece. You could paint them the same color as the wall as well to help make them less conspicuous. Or you could use some strap iron across the back to create more visual interest.

GreyhoundGuy 02-02-2018 09:28 PM

I'm assuming you're hoping to have the look of freestanding or floating wood towards the ceiling. If that's the case... I've got an idea... hang with me...

I agree with @shoot summ, you need some type of horizontal support. Would it work to put two horizontal strips of wood behind the TV, one towards the bottom of the TV and one towards the top. These horizontal pieces could be anchored into studs behind the wall, and they would be hidden by the TV when it's mounted.

Now the vertical pieces could be attached to the horizontal pieces for better hold, and they'd have the strength of the studding behind the wall as support.

If you're trying to keep the vertical pieces flush with the wall, you could cut out cross half lap joints like the image below so that the structural horizontal piece would be flush with the wall, but the vertical pieces would be joined (via Liquid Nails and screws?) via the cross half lap joints and should be pretty solid.

http://www.craftsmanspace.com/sites/..._lap_joint.gif

Then at the top, you could do lightweight nails or something similar just to keep them flush to the wall. Maybe... not sure if that's the best route to go.

So there's my idea... mind you, I'm NOT a professional by any means. This is just a quick idea I had.

-Joel

GeorgeC 02-03-2018 07:38 AM

[quote=gj13us;1874497]
Quote:

Originally Posted by GeorgeC (Post 1874433)

Pretty sure our HDs and Lowes have 2x only as framing lumber or pressure treated. Everything else is 1x, plus some assorted stuff in 1/2" and 1/4". More recently I saw 5/4 pine and poplar, but not regularly.

"Pretty sure ----------" Why not be exactly knowledgeable. Go ask them. Most of those places keep their "good" lumber in an area separate from the construction grade lumber.

George

Steve Neul 02-03-2018 08:15 AM

I don't know of any reason construction grade lumber couldn't be used. Of course if you just grab up the wood off the stack there is going to be a lot of bad wood but if you take the time to sift through the stack there is good wood there too. Some of it you may only get one rip off the board increasing the waste but I think in the end the cost would pay for the trouble.

gj13us 02-03-2018 09:59 AM

[quote=GeorgeC;1874977]
Quote:

Originally Posted by gj13us (Post 1874497)

"Pretty sure ----------" Why not be exactly knowledgeable. Go ask them. Most of those places keep their "good" lumber in an area separate from the construction grade lumber.

George

I say "pretty sure" because I've never seen it there, but there's always a probability that someone else has, and a probability that I'd be called on it if I said, "They don't carry it." :laugh2: For years I've been crawling all over our local HDs and Lowes window shopping for wood and have never seen 2x in anything other than framing and treated. But there's always a chance, I suppose, that they have a separate stock somewhere.

[About 15 years ago I spied 1x maple at our HD that was on clearance sale and I spent about $200 to stock up--which is a lot for me to spend on wood all at once. I've never seen 1x maple at that store since. :crying2: On the other hand, I live about 40 minutes away from Groff & Groff and Hearne. :grin:]

GeorgeC 02-03-2018 12:08 PM

As I said,, don't be just "pretty sure", ask them what they carry. Both Home Depot and Lowes here have better grade lumber that you probably would not notice in just a casual walk about the store. What can you lose by asking???????????? If they do not have in stock they may offer to order for you.

George

Mir Mahmood 02-10-2018 01:51 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Hi everyone,

Thanks for your replies and suggestions! In reading through the threads, I think adding some sort of horizontal support might be the way to go (perhaps both on the top and bottom).

As far as dimensions go, I'm looking at a overall width of around 4 feet. My ceiling is about 15 feet, and would love it to go all the way up. My wall is drywall (with wood studs spaced apart by 16 inches).

I'd like to stain the wood (rather than paint it).

Here's a shot of the design I've drew up, and a few inspiration shots I've found online.

Another option I am wondering is if I somehow put some brackets in between the spaces and paint them over?

Steve Neul 02-10-2018 06:54 AM

Adding support at the top and bottom won't work. You have all these vertical pieces with exacting space between and while you may be able to fabricate it as desired, it's wood and won't stay that way. The boards are going to warp. In time some of the boards would even touch each other. It will need something all the way from top to bottom keeping the spacing the same.


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