wood choice ??? high heat & humidity - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 2Likes
  • 1 Post By Brian T
  • 1 Post By Jim Frye
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 10 Old 11-08-2018, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
sgt panties's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 8
View sgt panties's Photo Album My Photos
Question wood choice ??? high heat & humidity

Hey all,

I'm wondering what would be the best type of wood would for this application.

I have this big double-wall pyrex mug that I use for tea. It originally came with a wood lid --basically just a disc shape comprised of several glued-together pieces of bamboo. The lid is meant to keep the tea hot while it is brewing in the mug. (Tea aficionados call this method of brewing "grandpa style".)

Well, I used the mug a few times in that way, and the lid only lasted maybe three brews. The lid split in more than one place (I forget now whether it split the wood itself or along the glue seams.)

So my question is, if I were to turn a piece myself, what would be the best kind of wood to use? I would want it to be one piece --no gluing, about 4" in diameter, at least 1/2" thick, and resistant to high heat and humidity. Cost is not a primary concern. I was thinking elm might be a good choice, since I remember it is notoriously difficult to split with an axe. Finish coating or stain or none at all is also undecided.

Any advice?

(PS. I guess I could just turn a slab of plastic, but it obviously doesn't have the romance that wood does.)
sgt panties is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 Old 11-08-2018, 03:54 PM
1948
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Dutchess County, NY
Posts: 510
View Packard's Photo Album My Photos
I don't think it will matter if you apply a small piece of formica to the bottom. Use silicone adhesive instead of contact cement. The silicone will tolerate the heat and moisture. The formica is waterproof.

I don't think any wood will stand up well to that.

Correction, I have a set of steak knives with some clear coat that has withstood 20 years of diswasher cleaning. I have no idea what that finish is. But it absolutely would do the job. It is not the wood. It is the finish.
Packard is offline  
post #3 of 10 Old 11-08-2018, 04:17 PM
Senior Member
 
TomCT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 1,304
View TomCT2's Photo Album My Photos
cedar or poplar or clear pine

a "hard" wood is too brittle, does the cracking thing.
TomCT2 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 10 Old 11-08-2018, 04:42 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
I would be inclined to use mahogany for that.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #5 of 10 Old 11-08-2018, 05:12 PM
Recycled Member
 
Brian T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Magnificently mountainous McBride in the Robson Valley
Posts: 321
View Brian T's Photo Album My Photos
Pick a wood with very small pores such as maple ot birch. They both have good thermal properties.
Turn several lids, do something radical!!!!


Finish with an oven-baked vegetable oil finish.

Wipe off the excess and you are done forever.
Waterproof, unwashable and never sweats.
Jim Frye likes this.
Brian T is offline  
post #6 of 10 Old 11-08-2018, 05:31 PM
The Nut in the Cellar
 
Jim Frye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Northwest Ohio
Posts: 1,033
View Jim Frye's Photo Album My Photos
Many years ago, I made some trivets from Maple. After milling, I finished them by soaking them in Watco Danish Oil (natural) for a couple of weeks and then cured them in a warming box for a week. They get stuff straight from the oven and have no issues after at least ten years.



Brian T likes this.

Jim Frye
I've gone out to find myself. If I return before I get back, have me wait for me.
"Sawdust is Man Glitter"
Jim Frye is offline  
post #7 of 10 Old 11-09-2018, 03:08 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,002
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
I suggest a rosewood

There are different varieties, I have Honduran Rosewood and it is extremely dense, so no moisture could penetrate. I also have some Zebrawood which is really cool. A natural oil rubbed in would keep it looking great for a long time. Other exotics which would be good are Padauk, Coco Bolo, Wenge etc. From here:
https://www.woodworkerssource.com/sh...otic_wood.html

I would also want a vent hole along the edge to allow the steam to escape, or maybe several notches would look OK. A small knob to assist getting it on and off should be part of the lid. Maybe a hole large enough to insert a finger tip which would also serve as a vent.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #8 of 10 Old 11-09-2018, 07:06 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 2,944
View TimPa's Photo Album My Photos
TimPa is offline  
post #9 of 10 Old 11-09-2018, 07:20 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,002
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
This will loook like real wood ...

It is real wood, but with resin impregnated so it's almost impervious to moisture and any harsh environments:
https://www.woodworkerssource.com/sh...otic_wood.html

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #10 of 10 Old 11-12-2018, 09:27 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
I recommend Teak. Teak is used on high end boats for wood trim. These boats get the heat and humidity.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
Reply

Tags
exotic wood

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Newbie wood questions bholland General Woodworking Discussion 10 10-29-2018 04:06 PM
Wood choice for coffee table setherson General Woodworking Discussion 9 12-01-2017 01:06 PM
How should I finish this wood Derek Gardner Wood Finishing 1 04-06-2017 07:06 PM
Basic Techniques Wood Engraving purnomoadi General Woodworking Discussion 0 11-16-2015 01:43 PM
Wood choice for new project HiltonDesignSolution General Woodworking Discussion 5 11-13-2015 07:11 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome