Wood Chair Disassembly/Repair - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By Steve Neul
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 6 Old 02-04-2018, 07:39 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 1
View Steve0064's Photo Album My Photos
Wood Chair Disassembly/Repair

Hello All! I am working on a project to repair a wobbly dining room chair. However, I have not run into this seat assembly before. The seat assembly is held together by corner blocks that are slotted (see photo). It appears this was a pressure fit and no glue was used on this portion. My concerns are the following:

1) What is this type of assembly called?
2) Can I safely take this apart? Is there a recommend approach for taking this apart?

Thanks!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1077.jpg
Views:	44
Size:	323.0 KB
ID:	339497  

Steve0064 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 6 Old 02-04-2018, 08:59 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 26,059
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Oh, it's glued alright. Most of the time you break the fingers off the corner blocks getting them off. I don't know what you might call it. It's one manufacturers idea to make the glue block stronger. It did't work. The joints came loose just as bad as any others and that type glue block just made the chair more difficult to repair.

If the chair rail is loose you don't have a choice but to either break the corner blocks off or cut them. I normally put a crowbar underneath the blocks and pried them off. Then I normally drilled holes and put them back on with screws and epoxy paste glue. Just make sure the blocks go exactly back on where they came off. Put some tape on the blocks and number them to insure this.
Jim Frye likes this.
Steve Neul is online now  
post #3 of 6 Old 02-04-2018, 09:35 PM
Generic Weeb
 
WeebyWoodWorker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Gorgeous Oregon!
Posts: 997
View WeebyWoodWorker's Photo Album My Photos
Well that's certainly an interesting design. I've never come across it before.
WeebyWoodWorker is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 6 Old 02-04-2018, 09:48 PM
The Nut in the Cellar
 
Jim Frye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Northwest Ohio
Posts: 1,033
View Jim Frye's Photo Album My Photos
You didn't specify the country of origin, but I'm wonder if it would be worth trying some warm vinegar in the joints to soften the glue up so you can pry things apart a bit easier. If the glue isn't some sort of alaphatic glue it may be something like a hide glue that will soften. Just a SWAG.

Jim Frye
I've gone out to find myself. If I return before I get back, have me wait for me.
"Sawdust is Man Glitter"
Jim Frye is offline  
post #5 of 6 Old 02-04-2018, 10:02 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 26,059
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Frye View Post
You didn't specify the country of origin, but I'm wonder if it would be worth trying some warm vinegar in the joints to soften the glue up so you can pry things apart a bit easier. If the glue isn't some sort of alaphatic glue it may be something like a hide glue that will soften. Just a SWAG.
They are American made chairs. The ones I worked on were all mahogany.
Steve Neul is online now  
post #6 of 6 Old 02-05-2018, 09:14 AM
The Nut in the Cellar
 
Jim Frye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Northwest Ohio
Posts: 1,033
View Jim Frye's Photo Album My Photos
Hmmm. The cuts looked so rough, I thought they might have been overseas made. I guess everyone has different standards for manufacturing. We once purchased a ready to finish buffet/hutch from a manufacturer located in Michigan. I was very taken aback when it arrived. It was supposed to be made of maple, but all of the cabinetry was maple veneer ply. The entire unit was simply stapled together (no glue) and the back of the hutch top was 1/8" smaller than the face frame. The face frames were just pocket screwed together. The top of the buffet part was the only thing glued and was made from 1 1/2" wide boards. The wood that was solid maple was full of mineral deposits, so I'm guessing it was the lowest quality wood they could find. Portions of the trim had been cut with a saber saw. I ended up knocking it all apart and re-building it from the pieces. An $850 kit. When I called the manufacturer to complain about the construction, they put me through to the shop foreman and he was quite proud of their construction methods.

Jim Frye
I've gone out to find myself. If I return before I get back, have me wait for me.
"Sawdust is Man Glitter"

Last edited by Jim Frye; 02-05-2018 at 09:16 AM. Reason: added text
Jim Frye is offline  
Reply

Tags
apron, chair, repair, seat

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help choosing wood and tools for air rifle stock Zebra General Woodworking Discussion 6 11-08-2017 10:46 AM
Green Wood Stool/kid Chair Nate Woodhall General Woodworking Discussion 13 03-20-2017 04:05 PM
Basic Techniques Wood Engraving purnomoadi General Woodworking Discussion 0 11-16-2015 01:43 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome