Wood bench joinery - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 11:03 AM Thread Starter
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Wood bench joinery

I have been researching this bench design and can’t figure out what kind of joinery is used can someone help ?
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post #2 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 11:18 AM
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Looks like a simple box joint but on a much large scale than normal
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post #3 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 12:52 PM
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You could call it a bridle joint, too. It would help to see more of the bench and how it is put together.

Here is a free book that you can download or read online, with excellent drawings of woodworking joints. It is old, and it expects you to use hand tools, but the same woodwork joints are still in use today. You can easily find several joints that are similar to the one in your photo, including box joints and bridle joints:

Woodwork Joints: How They Are Set Out, How Made and Where Used. by William Fairham
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/21531

Look at Fig. 78 (bridle joint) and Fig. 111 (Combing or Locking Joint, what we call a box joint).

Books at the Gutenberg Project are free for everyone to download. They are in the public domain.
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post #4 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 01:08 PM Thread Starter
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Yes for the box joint but how is it attached together, countersink screws, kreg screw, can’t make it out
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post #5 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 01:23 PM
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I would call it a half lap joint.



It could be held together about any way you desire that fits the look of what you want.


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post #6 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 01:24 PM
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It was probably clamped and glued. No screws or other fasteners are necessary.
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post #7 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 02:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
It was probably clamped and glued. No screws or other fasteners are necessary.
There are only two gluable faces of the joints for each leg; the rest are end grain. I'd be concerned about longevity of the glue in an exposed (outdoor) situation.

I think the joint should be braced on the underside. A simple 2x2 glued and screwed on the underside would make those joints much stronger.

Geoff
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post #8 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 02:38 PM
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Quote:
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I would call it a half lap joint.
I wouldn't.

"In a half lap joint or halving joint, material is removed from both of the members so that the resulting joint is the thickness of the thickest member."
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post #9 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 03:02 PM
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Looking at a photo will tell very little about how out is constructed, a good craftsman would be capable of hiding anything extra such as dowels between the top and legs to retain the integrity of the design.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #10 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 03:04 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the input will take all into consideration...
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post #11 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by AmishElectricCo View Post
I wouldn't.

"In a half lap joint or halving joint, material is removed from both of the members so that the resulting joint is the thickness of the thickest member."

Looks to me that is exactly how it was made.


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post #12 of 14 Old 01-23-2020, 07:30 PM
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If it's Japanese, I'll bet my bottom dollar all of you are wrong. Some of the Japanese joinery is a compendium of very intricate and complex joints that will baffle the best of us. There are probably hidden joints under the surface that would lock this bench in place where no one will venture to guess how they did it.

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Retired woodworker, amongst other things, Sold full time cruising boat and now full time cruising in RV. Currently in Somerville, Tx
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post #13 of 14 Old 02-19-2020, 11:58 AM
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Hello everybody. I am interested in how you make blanks. I have tried many ways. I mean, the way you make a blank for crafts. I will cut off the excess parts with an electric jigsaw. I had a few of them, but they all quickly failed. Yes, I did not buy expensive jigsaws, because I thought that they should be enough for such purposes. In the article: https://tehno.guru/best-jigsaw/ I read that the Dewalt DCS335B can easily cope with even the most complex and complex incisions. But I need a reliable jigsaw that will last a long time. What can you advise me?
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post #14 of 14 Old 02-21-2020, 01:46 PM
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If I were doing it, I'd count on glue failing. It's an outdoor bench, so it's going to be stressed. I'd go with one of the following, depending on how I felt that day:

1) Drawbore it. You'd be looking at something more akin to timber framing than furniture making, but it's a solid joint and will last as long as the wood does.

2) Peg it without offsetting the holes in the leg. Basically a drawbore without the "draw" part.

3) Use Timberlok fasteners. Drive a couple of them in from each side and call it good.
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