Wine barrel - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 15 Old 01-08-2020, 05:21 PM Thread Starter
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Wine barrel

How can I cut the staves of a wine barrel straight

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post #2 of 15 Old 01-08-2020, 05:36 PM
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welcome aboard Tim.

are you talking about cutting the sides of the staves
so you will have a curved board ??
what kind of power tools do you have access to ?
way more information will help us help you.
what is your project ??

.

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post #3 of 15 Old 01-09-2020, 01:55 PM Thread Starter
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Yes I want to cut the sides of the staves so they're same size from 1 end to the other. The middle of the staves are bigger in the middle. Example, I want the board or stave to be 2 1/2 inches from 1 end to the other

I have a table saw, and a band saw

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post #4 of 15 Old 01-09-2020, 01:56 PM Thread Starter
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Were making bar stools

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post #5 of 15 Old 01-09-2020, 01:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timshd View Post
I have a table saw, and a band saw

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You will most likely need a jig and an angled router bit to make these before assembly.. unless you know your exact sizing it will be trial and era...Bob
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post #6 of 15 Old 01-10-2020, 01:04 PM
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Coopers had to undergo a long apprenticeship before being accepted as cask makers.
Watch a few Utubes.

https://imbibemagazine.com/the-craft...master-cooper/

johnep

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post #7 of 15 Old 01-11-2020, 06:07 AM
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The video that they show during the Guiness Brewery tour has a good section on the coopers at work. The speed that they had was impressive.
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post #8 of 15 Old 01-11-2020, 06:35 AM
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Think yall have it backwards, the OP seems like hes got a wine barrel with the staves already with the profile, and theyre trying to straighten out the edges.

If i have that right, and if you have a table saw, look into a straight line rip jig to establish a straight edge, then use the rip fence to get the edges parallel

I need cheaper hobby
etsy.com/shop/projectepicfail
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post #9 of 15 Old 01-11-2020, 07:27 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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Staves are all curves ....

They are curved in every view, so a table saw wouldn't be a safe solution. A bandsaw would be better if you can hold them securely.


A holding fixture that would lay them long side down on the bench top would be good if you wanted to hand or power plane the edges
straight.

A table saw using a similar fixture that held them securely would also work, but free hand would be a No-No.

Making the holding fixture will take some time and planning but it will be worth it for making several or many of these edges straight. Use plywood to make the curved portions and clamps or bolts to secure them. Cut the plywood curves with a bandsaw or sabre saw, in multiple thickness and stack them vertically.

Some ideas here:
https://www.woodworkersjournal.com/c...cialty-clamps/

https://www.wikihow.com/Make-Wood-Flexible
Ignore the first 4 illustrations and go to the plywood one using two pipe clamps, number 5.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #10 of 15 Old 01-11-2020, 03:31 PM
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I am thinking of a fixture to hold the staves flat and secure and then run them through a bandsaw, with a fixture under the stave it will likely be to high to use a table saw.

Something like this but with blocks to support the stave where it is clamped;
http://sawdustmaking.com/TaperJig/taperjig.htm
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post #11 of 15 Old 01-12-2020, 01:14 AM
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The way to do it is using a jointer or a hand plane. The hand plane with the stave in a vise is probably the safest way to do it. It should take less than 10 minutes per stave and with a hand plane you'll keep all ten.

Rich
Just a dumb old paper boy from Brooklyn, NY
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post #12 of 15 Old 01-12-2020, 09:01 AM
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The way to do it is using a jointer or a hand plane. The hand plane with the stave in a vise is probably the safest way to do it. It should take less than 10 minutes per stave and with a hand plane you'll keep all ten.
... because if you lose one on a power tool, you will only be able to spend 9 minutes per stave when you switch to the hand plane.

Unless you are very skilled with a hand plane, I think that a clamping jig and a bandsaw suggested by @FrankC, used carefully, is the easiest approach. That assumes you have access to a bandsaw with sufficient resaw capacity (blade height) to fit each curved stave. The staves I have seen (often used to make tea light holders as a craft project) seem to stick up only a few inches, perhaps six inches at most.

I have made similar cuts on my bandsaw, when my spouse has asked me to resaw pieces of wood that already have curved cutouts from her scroll saw. The bandsaw blade passes through open air where the gaps are. No matter; it works. The pieces are not long enough to run through the planer, so I cut them on the bandsaw. Leave time for sanding out the bandsaw blade cut marks.

I orient the wood so as to provide the most support for the cut. In the case of barrel staves, I would orient them like a bridge, not like a bowl. Make sure that both ends of the stave are well clamped and supported. Cut slowly. The clamping jig is there to protect your fingers. So are push blocks, push sticks, and other similar aids. Be careful to keep your fingers away from the exposed blade and the cut line, and use proper bandsaw cutting techniques to prevent your fingers from suddenly thrusting towards the blade.
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post #13 of 15 Old 01-13-2020, 12:25 AM
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Thinking about how Mr. Capel taught me how to use a hand plane in 6th grade, (ca. 1953) doing the barrel staves is no big deal. The biggest problem that a novice would have is holding the plane level during the planning operation.

A lady down the street came by wanting to attach a mail box to a post. (Typical rural style, usually galvanized back then but now aluminum.) The easiest way is to fit a piece of hard wood into the bottom of the mail box. Attach that piece to the post then attach the mail box. I didn't really have access to my table saw so I used the SCMS to trim to length and then a hand plane to trim about 3/8 off the width. Less than 10 minutes in total. And it has been well over 60 years since I used a hand plane for anything that serious.

Rich
Just a dumb old paper boy from Brooklyn, NY
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post #14 of 15 Old 01-13-2020, 11:00 AM
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Sadly, most of us never had Mr. Capel in 6th grade, and most of us lack your hand plane skills and experience, however old. Perhaps hand plane skills are like riding a bicycle. I still believe that the bandsaw clamping jig solution proposed by @FrankC would be easiest and yield the most consistent results.

Mr. Capel may be long gone, but his family would be pleased to know that he left a lasting impression with at least one student. May we all be as blessed to be fondly remembered so many years after we are gone.
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post #15 of 15 Old 01-13-2020, 12:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
he left a lasting impression with at least one student.
May we all be as blessed to be fondly remembered so many years after we are gone.
Mr. John Day was my shop teacher. the impression he left with me
was not to sniff the Resorcinol Glue as it had formaldehyde in it and
we would be dead before supper.
the other one was the long lathe gouge stuck in the ceiling over the
wood lathe where it caught a bad catch and flung it up there.
it was several years later that our paths crossed again and we were
just passing the time time and I mentioned the gouge stuck in the
ceiling over the lathe.
he laughed . . . . yeah, one of the students let the gouge get away
from him and tossed it upwards and it fell on the floor.
after the semester ended, he got a step ladder and drove the gouge
into the ceiling with a hammer - just to get our attention.
it got MY attention and has kept it forever.
Thank You Mr. Day for your patience, encouragement and sharing your skills.
the image of a turning gouge stuck in the ceiling is very hard to forget.

.

.
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