Wide chamfer or edge on a length of oak - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 07-31-2019, 12:14 PM Thread Starter
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Wide chamfer or edge on a length of oak

I’m new, and sorry if it’s a simple question, or in the wrong section.

I need to make a replacement for an internal door lower threshold, and I cannot source the same profile timber anywhere where I live (Stockholm, Sweden).

I would of said it was a very basic job, but I can’t think how to do it.

The cross-section needs to be 110mm wide, and 10mm high, but the part I’m having issues with is that I need to add an angle of maybe 10 degrees for 30mm at the edges, so it should look something like a flattened speed bump.

I was thinking a plane or a belt sander....but I’m not sure how to rig it up.

Any help would be great.

/James
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post #2 of 14 Old 07-31-2019, 12:54 PM
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If you have a decent hand plane that is probably the safest way. You could also do it on a table saw, on edge. On the saw setup some way of guiding the work so it can't deviate from the intended path.
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post #3 of 14 Old 07-31-2019, 02:50 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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I had to do the same thing for a threshold .....

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Originally Posted by Larry Schweitzer View Post
If you have a decent hand plane that is probably the safest way. You could also do it on a table saw, on edge. On the saw setup some way of guiding the work so it can't deviate from the intended path.

At 36" long the tablesaw is a good method. Longer than that it will get a bit unmanagable. Featherboards and maybe a taller fence will help support it.
A circular saw with the blade set over would also work IF you securely clamp it down to the edge of the bench or an old door. Use the ripping guide OR a guide clamped to the piece.
A hand plane will take until next year .......

A handsaw will give you a good a start to finish with the hand plane.


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #4 of 14 Old 07-31-2019, 03:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Schweitzer View Post
If you have a decent hand plane that is probably the safest way. You could also do it on a table saw, on edge. On the saw setup some way of guiding the work so it can't deviate from the intended path.

My order of preference would be hand plane, table saw and router table.


You do not state what tools you have.



George
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post #5 of 14 Old 07-31-2019, 03:23 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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A "wide" chamfer is 2" or so ....

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My order of preference would be hand plane, table saw and router table.
You do not state what tools you have.
George

Having made several, it's too much material to remove with a hand plane.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #6 of 14 Old 07-31-2019, 08:58 PM
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I've made wooden sills before, somebody wanted one that was seven feet long in white oak once. Had a sled that angled my piece and ran it through the planer, worked just fine.


-T
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post #7 of 14 Old 08-01-2019, 02:46 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone for the posts! I think it sounds like the best idea is to see if I can find a timber mill or hardware store that will let me setup on a table saw; and if I can’t find one then slowly work at it with a plane.
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post #8 of 14 Old 08-01-2019, 06:40 AM
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looks similar profile to skirting board.

https://www.loveskirting.co.uk/door-frames-sills-c15


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Last edited by johnep; 08-01-2019 at 06:44 AM.
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post #9 of 14 Old 08-01-2019, 12:19 PM
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I'd use a plane. It'll probably be faster than the time you'll spend searching for another alternative.
(that being said, I'm always looking for reasons to use a plane.)
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post #10 of 14 Old 08-01-2019, 12:30 PM
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I've been thinking about this ....

I would use a circular saw and a jig.

Fasten the workpiece to another 36" long 1 X at 90 degrees to act as a support base.
Clamp it to the bench top. Now it's vertical!


Screw a similar angled "jig" to the base of the saw at the distance needed to create the desired angle for the blade. Keep the flat part against the workpiece and make your cut.


It won't saw deep enough, so use a handsaw to finish it.

https://youtu.be/kD0yMjknO_0?t=233



Here a table saw version using 2 cuts that are at the same angle, and flipping the board for each pass. EDIT: No jig required here:

https://youtu.be/_tR0uZbtfCA?t=478

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-01-2019 at 02:50 PM. Reason: added edit
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post #11 of 14 Old 08-01-2019, 01:53 PM
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My goodness, how did the old timers manage before all these power tools and jigs that will likely take longer to make than the time it would take to grab a sharp hand plane and go to work.

I can see tooling up if there were multiples of these to make, not for a one off.
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post #12 of 14 Old 08-01-2019, 03:00 PM
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Oh, they probably used a ...........

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
My goodness, how did the old timers manage before all these power tools and jigs that will likely take longer to make than the time it would take to grab a sharp hand plane and go to work.

I can see tooling up if there were multiples of these to make, not for a

one off.

When I made the two I needed, I probably used the bandsaw. I angled the table over to 10 degrees or so and made one cut. Simple.
Even old timers has band saws or bow saws. Hand planing away all the waste material would not be my idea of fun ..... maybe as an apprentice project?
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #13 of 14 Old 08-01-2019, 05:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Hand planing away all the waste material would not be my idea of fun ..... maybe as an apprentice project?
But what a wonderful project for teaching the use of a hand plane.

Back in year 8 shop class (ca. 1956) I made a 3 leg table and the top had an angled chamfer. IIRC all I did was rock the plane on its side and plane until it looked good.

Rich
Just a dumb old paper boy from Brooklyn, NY
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post #14 of 14 Old 08-03-2019, 04:43 PM
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i can't see this taking more than an hour with a hand plane
he has a 1x4 probably no more than 36" long

yes, i'd use my table saw, because i have one
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