Why the tabs on ball bearing slides? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 14 Old 07-28-2017, 07:35 PM Thread Starter
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Why the tabs on ball bearing slides?

Why do ball bearing slides have flanges or tabs cut into the cabinet side of the slides?
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post #2 of 14 Old 07-28-2017, 07:37 PM
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If is what I am thinking, it is for small adjustments

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post #3 of 14 Old 07-28-2017, 07:49 PM Thread Starter
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post #4 of 14 Old 07-28-2017, 09:03 PM
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It's so you can put a shem behind the slide and the tab will bend out to what ever you are fastening the slide to.
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post #5 of 14 Old 07-28-2017, 09:09 PM Thread Starter
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It's so you can put a shem behind the slide and the tab will bend out to what ever you are fastening the slide to.
I see, so I might could fix my previously posted drawer problem this way.

I mean there must be some way to adjust slides that are fastened directly the case sides. Im my case, the sides weren't exactly parallel, so one side of the drawer doesn't retract 100%, and it's bugging me and I want to fix it..

Finding exact information about how to adjust slides attached to the case side is like finding the needle... lots of info on faceframe + rear bracket adjustment. I even have a book on cabinet making, and in it he says "you'll likely have to fine tune your hardware if the drawer is skewed or doesn't close evenly" and he leaves it at that.. no words on technique on how to do so...
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post #6 of 14 Old 07-28-2017, 09:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plasma800 View Post
I see, so I might could fix my previously posted drawer problem this way.

I mean there must be some way to adjust slides that are fastened directly the case sides. Im my case, the sides weren't exactly parallel, so one side of the drawer doesn't retract 100%, and it's bugging me and I want to fix it..

Finding exact information about how to adjust slides attached to the case side is like finding the needle... lots of info on faceframe + rear bracket adjustment. I even have a book on cabinet making, and in it he says "you'll likely have to fine tune your hardware if the drawer is skewed or doesn't close evenly" and he leaves it at that.. no words on technique on how to do so...
Your slides have to be perpendicular to the face of the cabinet. If not, they won't close right.

Tabs are for minor shimming adjustments. Fasten through the hole furthest down the tab then come behind it with a flat bar and pry out slightly bending the tab.

I really like fastening through the tabs on soft close mounts because the extra play seems to allow the soft close function to work better.
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post #7 of 14 Old 07-28-2017, 10:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plasma800 View Post
I see, so I might could fix my previously posted drawer problem this way.

I mean there must be some way to adjust slides that are fastened directly the case sides. Im my case, the sides weren't exactly parallel, so one side of the drawer doesn't retract 100%, and it's bugging me and I want to fix it..

Finding exact information about how to adjust slides attached to the case side is like finding the needle... lots of info on faceframe + rear bracket adjustment. I even have a book on cabinet making, and in it he says "you'll likely have to fine tune your hardware if the drawer is skewed or doesn't close evenly" and he leaves it at that.. no words on technique on how to do so...
In order to put a shem behind the slide though the drawer box has to be small enough to allow it. If both the box sides are parallel and the space between is an inch bigger than the box it won't work to use a shem.
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post #8 of 14 Old 07-28-2017, 11:45 PM
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If your cabinet is slightly wider at the back than in the front, it's a pretty easy fix with shims.
But if the front of the cabinet is on the money (1" wider than the drawer) and your back is narrower than the front, your problem is much more difficult. It might require removing material from each side to gain the space needed. This is never easy.
If your cabinet is built out of square more than slightly, you're looking at a do-over.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #9 of 14 Old 07-29-2017, 11:23 AM Thread Starter
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Yes, the back of my cabinet is wider than the front, by a bit.. 1/2 an inch or so. Just shop drawers, but I'll be moving into home pieces next, and I want to make sure I have some procedures in place before hand.

It's seems to me, that in the frameless cabinet and furniture world, this would be a hot topic. Either lots of discussion on how to insure square cabinets, or lots of discussion on adjusting the hardware.. neither seems to be the case.

I think the first place for me to start is to begin paying greater attention to detail with regards to making square boxes.

For instance, something I hadn't thought of but picked up out of a book, is that I shouldn't count on plywood being square. This writer suggest building a large square using 3, 4, 5 as a shop made jig and trimming the ends of the plywood with a flush cut bit to make the ends square to the sides of the sheet... something I had never considered.

I think I'm making my largest errors in breaking down sheet goods. I'm being slightly sloppy with my track saw, and i've also tried breaking an entire sheet on my table saw, usually with really sloppy results...

Last edited by plasma800; 07-29-2017 at 11:30 AM.
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post #10 of 14 Old 07-29-2017, 12:36 PM
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If you build frameless (Euro boxes) they only work well if you cut and assemble very accurately. With the tools that many small shops and home shops have, it can be done but takes care and time. Plywood can be a killer since it is rarely square, flat or consistently uniform in thickness. Next issue is plywood often has stresses built into it that are relieved when it is cut causing it to curl one way or another (occasionally particle board will have some stress problems also.) That's why you normally see melamine coated particle board or MDF used in production.
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post #11 of 14 Old 07-29-2017, 01:19 PM Thread Starter
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If you build frameless (Euro boxes) they only work well if you cut and assemble very accurately. With the tools that many small shops and home shops have, it can be done but takes care and time. Plywood can be a killer since it is rarely square, flat or consistently uniform in thickness. Next issue is plywood often has stresses built into it that are relieved when it is cut causing it to curl one way or another (occasionally particle board will have some stress problems also.) That's why you normally see melamine coated particle board or MDF used in production.
I'm going to try doing some work with both melamine and MDF. My next project is a credenza with 3 drawers... and I'm thinking MDF is the way to go here on the case. It's worth an experiment anyway.
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post #12 of 14 Old 07-30-2017, 11:18 PM
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plasma800, MDF and melamine board both have issues for the home shop. Both are heavy, both make fine dust when cutting or routing, especially MDF. Protect yourself from the dust! W/O the correct means of cutting, melamine can be prone to chipping.
When sizing the drawer openings we will use 1 1/32" instead of the minimum required 1". A lot of things can add up to eat up that 1/32" --- Case & drawer part sizes, case or drawer boxes being slightly out of square, material thickness variations, drawer guide size, etc.
I have a small commercial shop with the equipment to maintain pretty good accuracy. Everything is done with CAD/CAM and sent to the machines by wire. The beam saw and router can maintain +- 0.002" but the bore & insert machine can be off by as much as .004". The case clamp presses both directions and can maintain 0.015" diagonal/square. The drawer clamp can do at least that good. We don't measure a part with a tape measure. We put 10 parts end to end and measure then divide by 10, not a perfect solution since it could be self canceling. So you can see that even though we are totally CNC driven, tolerances can add up. In actual day to day production, nothing is measured.
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post #13 of 14 Old 07-31-2017, 02:10 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Larry Schweitzer View Post
plasma800, MDF and melamine board both have issues for the home shop. Both are heavy, both make fine dust when cutting or routing, especially MDF. Protect yourself from the dust! W/O the correct means of cutting, melamine can be prone to chipping.
When sizing the drawer openings we will use 1 1/32" instead of the minimum required 1". A lot of things can add up to eat up that 1/32" --- Case & drawer part sizes, case or drawer boxes being slightly out of square, material thickness variations, drawer guide size, etc.
I have a small commercial shop with the equipment to maintain pretty good accuracy. Everything is done with CAD/CAM and sent to the machines by wire. The beam saw and router can maintain +- 0.002" but the bore & insert machine can be off by as much as .004". The case clamp presses both directions and can maintain 0.015" diagonal/square. The drawer clamp can do at least that good. We don't measure a part with a tape measure. We put 10 parts end to end and measure then divide by 10, not a perfect solution since it could be self canceling. So you can see that even though we are totally CNC driven, tolerances can add up. In actual day to day production, nothing is measured.
I have noticed my drawers end up tighter than I thought they would in the slides!
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post #14 of 14 Old 07-31-2017, 02:28 PM Thread Starter
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Maybe baltic birch would be best for this build.

The build will actually be covered in Formica, so I just need straight, smooth pieces on this rather simple build.
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