Why does gorilla glue recommend moistening? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 27 Old 07-03-2019, 09:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
Gorilla Glue is water reacting. Just like silicone caulk, it requires moisture for the reaction needed for it to set and harden. In high humidity areas it sets and hardens from the moisture in the air. In drier climates, it doesn't get enough moisture from the air to set up quickly. Adding moisture to one surface to be joined will speed up the setting and drying action of the glue.

That being said, I have used Gorilla Glue and I don't like the foaming and the mess that it makes. I've gone back to using more traditional glues like Titebond II, III, and Titebond Extend.

Charley
Has anyone else that used Gorilla glue noticed that the inevitable squeeze out that falls to the bar clamps below is much tougher to remove from the clamp action than a regular wood glue? I have some Bessey bar clamps and I have gone away from Gorilla because it is so time consuming and tedious to remove the dried residue on the bar clamps.
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post #22 of 27 Old 07-03-2019, 11:08 AM
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QUOTE=epicfail48;2061117] [...] Also, the "cool, dark place" recommendation for storing the clear stuff is likely to prevent UV degradation from making it cloudy, as well as slow down unintended curing. Plastic is permeable to moisture and heat can do weird stuff to glue, and cool air is both lower in moisture and heat[/QUOTE]
Actually the "clear stuff" (Clear Gorilla Glue) should be stored in a cool place with light exposure, not the dark. It is my understanding that the light helps keep it clear and prevent yellowing. Clear Gorilla Glue is not a polyurethane glue.
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post #23 of 27 Old 07-03-2019, 01:50 PM
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Thanks for the link.
I really don't like to use urethane glues, the CO2 foaming makes a mess and if you use them to take care of sloppy fits you are still getting a poor glue line. The Hot melt urethanes like 3M sells work very well for odd material fastening, cost a lot. I've never tried the Silane adhesives.
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post #24 of 27 Old 07-04-2019, 08:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
Iím curious to know the ďwhyĒ about Gorilla glue recommending moistening one surface before using Gorilla glue.



Is it that Gorilla Glue requires moisture to cure? In that case, isnít the 80% humidity in my basement enough to make the glue kick? Would lack of moisture just cause the glue to take longer to cure? Is a long curing time bad?



Doesnít the wet surface impede good bonding?



Iím not necessarily questioning the practice of moistening, just interested in learning more about the chemistry behind it.
It creates a better bond with the surface being glued.
If you look at fibre glassing , pre wetting the surface is a known factor in creating a stronger bond when laying fibre glass.
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post #25 of 27 Old 07-04-2019, 09:39 PM
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Originally Posted by jason789 View Post
It creates a better bond with the surface being glued.
If you look at fibre glassing , pre wetting the surface is a known factor in creating a stronger bond when laying fibre glass.
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Not sure about all that, being an old time fiberglass worker myself,,,but do what ever turns you on.
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post #26 of 27 Old 07-05-2019, 12:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onefreetexan View Post
Not sure about all that, being an old time fiberglass worker myself,,,but do what ever turns you on.
Well, if you are an old fibre glasser ...
Look at construction techniques with marine ply and fibre glass. Pre wetting is standard procedure (using resin) with both glueing/filling joints and with laminating joints and the panels themselves, even laminating layers pre wetting with resin is a standard procedure....or does that statement need some sort of correction?
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post #27 of 27 Old 07-05-2019, 09:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jason789 View Post
Well, if you are an old fibre glasser ...
Look at construction techniques with marine ply and fibre glass. Pre wetting is standard procedure (using resin) with both glueing/filling joints and with laminating joints and the panels themselves, even laminating layers pre wetting with resin is a standard procedure....or does that statement need some sort of correction?
Cheers, Jason
You just made it. The correction you made was "pre wetting with resin", above.

(Lacking any experience with fiberglas, when I read your first statement, I assumed you meant water when you wrote "pre wetting". Your subsequent post fixed that to clarify that you meant "pre wetting with resin.")
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