Where to find a mentor. - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 18 Old 08-05-2014, 08:54 PM Thread Starter
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Where to find a mentor.

Since I have started doing more and more projects, I have come to realize that my thirst for knowledge has increased exponentially. I now want to learn inlay, carving, turning, and more. The problem is, I cant find anyone. I have looked online for clubs but the only one that comes up hasnt replied to my email. Im 17 and in Highschool still. Im looking for someone in the middle Ga area. The only people I know who are woodworkers go and do small renovations and they just go to our local store and buy all the things they need like crown molding and stuff. The stuff they do is stuff I can already do. I doubt anyone in my town of 11,000 uses this forum but Im willing to bet yall know where to find one.

So, where do I start?
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post #2 of 18 Old 08-05-2014, 09:06 PM
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You can find them in the unlikeliest places. We're going through some nasty wildfires right now, and the pastor at the church next door has helped us out a lot. Turns out he was a cabinet maker for 30+ years, and his shop burned down (no longer his livelihood, thank goodness), so I might hit him up with some questions after all this wildfire nonsense is over.

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post #3 of 18 Old 08-06-2014, 03:23 AM
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I have learnt a great deal from this forum. Two of the best:

Making a simple guide for a circular saw to enable accurate straight line cutting without a table saw.
What is pocket joinery and how to use it.
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post #4 of 18 Old 08-06-2014, 08:48 AM
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There are many facets to woodworking, and sadly not too many places offer apprenticeships as they did years ago. Consider contacting places that manufacture cabinets, furniture, or do wood turning. Also perhaps a larger lumber store (not big box stores) could suggest a few professional carpenters that may be interested in having an ambitious HS student help out on the job site. The work may be hard, the pay may be minimum, but the knowledge is "priceless"! Be safe.
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post #5 of 18 Old 08-06-2014, 10:43 AM
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If you can afford it Highland in Atlanta is a good place to take some lessons, here is a link:
http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/w...-seminars.aspx

http://www.diychatroom.com/
The Other
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If you do what you've always done, you will get what you've always got.
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post #6 of 18 Old 08-06-2014, 11:33 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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A Yahoo search tells you...

There are 2 companies listed under Woodworking In Warner Robins, GA. Contact them for either a mentor or a opportunity for part time employment.
http://www.yellowbook.com/yellow-pag...r+robins%2C+ga

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #7 of 18 Old 08-06-2014, 01:23 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodchux View Post
There are many facets to woodworking, and sadly not too many places offer apprenticeships as they did years ago. Consider contacting places that manufacture cabinets, furniture, or do wood turning. Also perhaps a larger lumber store (not big box stores) could suggest a few professional carpenters that may be interested in having an ambitious HS student help out on the job site. The work may be hard, the pay may be minimum, but the knowledge is "priceless"! Be safe.
woodchux
Yea, I mainly just wanna learn. Money is also helps
Quote:
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If you can afford it Highland in Atlanta is a good place to take some lessons, here is a link:
http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/w...-seminars.aspx
I went to that store on my birthday and was in awe. The thing is, its 2 hours away and classes cost way to much for me. If I lived closer and have the money maybe but I dont. :D
Quote:
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There are 2 companies listed under Woodworking In Warner Robins, GA. Contact them for either a mentor or a opportunity for part time employment.
http://www.yellowbook.com/yellow-pag...r+robins%2C+ga
Its weird I have never heard of some of those businesses. I called a couple businesses before and they just kinda ignored me...
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post #8 of 18 Old 08-06-2014, 04:45 PM
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There is no magic bullet, take baby steps, add an additional small feature or new joint to your projects that you haven't done before, read, search the internet, ask here, there is lots of free help out there.
You are still young, have patience Grasshopper.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #9 of 18 Old 08-06-2014, 07:04 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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the process

here's a post I made a while back:

Working in Wood a 3 part process

Step 1, the inspiration part, the design, the drawings and sketches, how and where the joints will be made, sizes, proportions etc.

Then Step 2, the mechanical part, making the piece, set-ups jigs, which tools to use, the fitting, gluing and sanding.

Then Step 3, and I think this is where a lot of us sort of drop the ball, finishing.

This is part is where chemistry, past experience, trial and error, and skill or artistry, all come together. All the time and effort in the first steps are for naught, if the finish doesn't turn out well, the color is wrong or blotchy etc.

For some of us it's the most confusing, mysterious and complicated part of the process. Spray guns, tip sizes, water based vs solvent based, spray booths, lighting, availability etc. all play a role in the success or lack thereof in the average woodworker's finished project.

If you work backwards from the finishing, knowing in advance how you will go about it, that may help getting a better result. A great project can be ruined by a less than satisfactory finishing process. Get real familiar with your stains, your top coats and your spray equipment before attempting to finish a project you have lots of time and materials invested..... just sayin'
Stick with one method or until you master it. Don't switch back and forth between water based to solvent based and expect consistent results.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #10 of 18 Old 08-06-2014, 07:11 PM
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The easiest way for me to learn is just do it. Get some very cheap wood and practice. I also do a lot of reading on a subject and that seems to help out a lot.

Fill your heart with compassion, seek the jewel in every soul, share a word of kindness, and remember; the people's what it's about.
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post #11 of 18 Old 08-06-2014, 11:28 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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The easiest way for me to learn is just do it. Get some very cheap wood and practice. I also do a lot of reading on a subject and that seems to help out a lot.
Cheap and wood have never been in same sentence for me haha. Im working on some pallet projects right now. Hope they turn out well.
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post #12 of 18 Old 08-07-2014, 05:34 AM
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I realise the need for saving money however pallet wood isn't very good to work with. It's usually a poor cut of wood that is air dried rather than kiln dried. Depending on how old the pallet is the wood may be still green.

As far as the mentor much of the information you need you can get here. There is a carving section where there are several woodcarvers here that would help you get started. The inlay work could be posted in general woodworking and then there is a woodturning section. Choose a project you wish to build and ask for help to do it.
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post #13 of 18 Old 08-07-2014, 11:33 AM Thread Starter
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I realise the need for saving money however pallet wood isn't very good to work with. It's usually a poor cut of wood that is air dried rather than kiln dried. Depending on how old the pallet is the wood may be still green.

As far as the mentor much of the information you need you can get here. There is a carving section where there are several woodcarvers here that would help you get started. The inlay work could be posted in general woodworking and then there is a woodturning section. Choose a project you wish to build and ask for help to do it.
Well yes I realize that but isnt their more to a hands on approach? The aforementioned items were just some examples of things I wanted to learn. I dont know everything I would like to learn more. The hardest part about learning alone is not being able to afford the tools needed. I really want to learn about turning but cant afford a lathe. I have watched videos and on inlay and carving but they can only teach you so much.
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post #14 of 18 Old 08-07-2014, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernWoodworking View Post
Well yes I realize that but isnt their more to a hands on approach? The aforementioned items were just some examples of things I wanted to learn. I dont know everything I would like to learn more. The hardest part about learning alone is not being able to afford the tools needed. I really want to learn about turning but cant afford a lathe. I have watched videos and on inlay and carving but they can only teach you so much.
Part of being a woodworker is to figure out ways to do things with the tools you have and slowly add tools to your arsenal as you can afford them.

For example a drill press though designed to drill holes will also serve as a mini lathe and drum sander until you can afford dedicated machines.

I have always used my hobbies, other interests besides woodworking as well, to pay for the tools and materials I want.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #15 of 18 Old 08-07-2014, 06:16 PM
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While you look for local help you might peruse the video selection the Gwinnett Woodworkers put up on their Youtube channel. Ideas as well as technique here.
http://www.youtube.com/user/gwinnettwoodworkers
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post #16 of 18 Old 08-07-2014, 09:10 PM Thread Starter
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well thanks to our good friends in federal government ( dont get me started...) I cant work at all under anyone in woodworking. OSHA is stone walling me here. Called all the shops I could find and all said the same thing...OSHA!!! Even if I wasnt getting paid I couldnt. This is so annoying....
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post #17 of 18 Old 08-07-2014, 10:26 PM
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If you can't find a mentor or get a job...

Then you can watch You Tube for some of the best woodworkers:
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/5-woodw...bscribe-today/

Here's another entire list of You Tube Channels:
https://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=u...channels&type=

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #18 of 18 Old 08-07-2014, 10:47 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Then you can watch You Tube for some of the best woodworkers:
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/5-woodw...bscribe-today/

Here's another entire list of You Tube Channels:
https://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=u...channels&type=
Thanks for that but over the past few years, I have watched all the aforementioned youtubers videos and some more that were not mentioned. Thanks though!
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