What's the first step in commissioning a simple wooden door? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 03-25-2017, 06:08 PM Thread Starter
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What's the first step in commissioning a simple wooden door?

I have a unique requirement for a large interior door in a home we recently purchased. Here are the details: The master bedroom and bathroom are separated by a single large doorway, but no door. The doorway is a really high (90") and average width (36") and rectangular. When I'm getting ready in the morning, the sound pours through the open doorway to the bedroom where my wife is sleeping.

I'd like have a decent-looking sliding barn door for this walkway. The only problem is, I have no idea where to turn to find a place that has something like this or can make something like this. What are my options? Do I look for a guy with a woodshop that can glue together large vertical slabs of decent wood? Do I buy something pre-fab? Are there wood fabricators that do one-off projects? Something like Home Depot won't work because the pre-fab doors aren't tall enough.

I looked at a custom door company, and, while they have awesome interior/exterior doors of all different kinds, wood types, level of details, etc., they ranged from $1,000 to $5,000, which is way out of my budget. For example, this door is exactly the right size and looks amazing, but it's $2,600: http://www.doorsforbuilders.com/Wood...tsman%20Series

Any guidance would be greatly appreciated. At this point, I don't even know what to search in Google or where to even begin. My general contractor just shrugged his shoulders and couldn't offer me any wisdom. I'm in the Northwest burbs of Illinois.
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post #2 of 17 Old 03-25-2017, 09:46 PM
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It would be cheaper to buy one of those doors than make one by the time you would acquire the machinery and tooling to make the door. Assuming you have a normal shop you would have to have a shaper, house door coping and sticking set and a panel raise set of knives. You would also need a place where you could select through lumber to find some straight and true. When making a door you get the wood rough and flatten it on a 8"or 12" jointer before surfacing it.

The barn door is normally hung in front of the wall so you might be able to find a 96" door rather than having one custom made. That type of door isn't near as sound proof and a normal door.

If it were me I would get a 7' door, remove the casing and modify the opening and wall to fit the door.
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post #3 of 17 Old 03-25-2017, 10:02 PM
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no need for all that tooling

I have sliding "barn" doors on my garage overhang to keep the weather out. The are 8 ft X 8 ft and are made "hollow core". I made a 2" X 6" frame and skinned it with 3/8" rough sawn plywood, taking 2 sheets per side. Total thickness is about 2". So, based on that construction process, just make your frame the size you want and skin it with what ever material you like... plywood individual barnwood boards... what ever. I used Western sliding door hardware from the lumber yard that has a "U" track, BUT you can use a rail and wheel system, exposed for the barn door effect. You won't stop all the noise, but it will certainly mitigate it. The door may make more noise in operation than the noise from the running water.... I donno?

I've also made shed doors using the same process, 3Ft X 7 ft. also sliding on the Western track.


I made these barn doors 11 ft X 8 ft from Cypress using the original 100 year old hardware.



This sliding door hardware is really cooL!
https://www.wayfair.com/Belleze-Anti...5B%5D=18399349

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

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post #4 of 17 Old 03-25-2017, 10:09 PM
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What's the first step in commissioning a simple wooden door?

Sliding barn door would be neat, but as Steve said, not much for sound dampening.



I would do double doors, on hinges. That's what we have in our master bedroom from the entry way and between the master bath and bedroom. Our ceilings upstairs are only 96" and main level are 108".


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post #5 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 01:16 AM Thread Starter
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Based on what you guys have said, I'm starting to wonder if I should just find a contractor and have him re-frame the doorway and install a pocket door or something like that. That said, at the end of the day, I just need something that will provide a slight bit of sound-dampening. The sink and shower have a direct line of sight to the head of the bed, so if sounds can bounce off a door just a bit, that would be better than nothing. I imagine even hollow-core would help, even if a little bit.

Here's a picture of what I'm dealing with. Yes, I know. There are openings above the doorway, which would allow sound through anyway. Maybe I can cover those with plexi and then install the pocket door below.

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post #6 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 09:57 AM
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I don't think a barn door is the best bet for keeping noise from the master bath out of the bedroom. I do think you could put in a premade regular door with a little bit of work. This is actually a great homeowner project. You'll do a little bit of framing, then some drywall, then hang the door, and add some trim.

Since your opening is 36x90, it would be easiest to actually make your opening smaller so you could fit a standard, off the shelf, 32x80 prehung interior door. The rough opening will be 34x82 1/2".

First you'd make a little ladder out of 2x4 lumber with 2 pieces 36" long, and three pieces 4 1/2" long so that the while thing is 36"x7 1/2". Nail or screw that to the top and sides of the opening. Make sure it's centered, so the drywall can be patched in on both sides. Then on the hinge side of the opening, nail or screw a 82 1/2" piece of 2x4 with a strip of 1/2" OSB behind it. Again, make sure it's centered so you can add drywall.

Add some drywall, blend it in with painter and paint, then hang the door and put up some door trim. You'll probably have to remove the baseboard on the inside of the opening, and have to cut it back a bit so that the trim lines up right.
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post #7 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 09:59 AM
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I see you're in northern Illinois. Menard's will have everything you need.
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post #8 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 10:12 AM
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slding bathroom door thread

This topic was extensively cover here:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f9/my...-ideas-149290/

One illustration:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #9 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 10:25 AM
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First step would be to find another general contractor by the sound of things.

If you don't want to do the work yourself talk to some local handymen and see what they suggest and get a few quotes for comparison. New standard size interior doors are not that expensive, around here there are places that sell good high end used doors as well. There may be a way to fill in the top so that it ties in with the door and looks like it was designed that way.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #10 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 02:29 PM
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Find someone in your area that advertises to be a "handy man." Most of these guys can fix you right up. There are many things you can do to enclose that space above the door. It could even be framed and glassed in. There are lots of 36" doors on the market.

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post #11 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 04:04 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
This topic was extensively cover here:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f9/my...-ideas-149290/

One illustration:
This is excellent. Looks like something I might be able to pull off on my own.

In case anyone is wondering, here is what my space looks like. Because the ceilings are so high, I'd like to maintain the high doorway. And, yes, I know the door will do little to block sounds when I have three gaping holes right above it!
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post #12 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 05:45 PM
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You did not tell us about the holes above. However, they can easily be glassed in.

And there can be a transom above the door.

I think your real problem is that you want the privacy of the door. Right?

From your picture it is not clear that you will have room to the side of the door for all of the hardware of a barn door.

George
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post #13 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 08:54 PM
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How much noise would the rolling door make as opposed to opening a hinged door?
Or you could have the wife take a big slug of Benedryl before bedtime.

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post #14 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 09:05 PM
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Two 18" hardwood doors would be another option. A 36" opening is good from bedroom to bath. Easy access. (Even with a walker).

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #15 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 09:45 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
You did not tell us about the holes above. However, they can easily be glassed in.

And there can be a transom above the door.

I think your real problem is that you want the privacy of the door. Right?

From your picture it is not clear that you will have room to the side of the door for all of the hardware of a barn door.

George
When you say "easily glassed in," how easy? Is it something an ordinary DIY'er can do with custom cut glass and a little elbow grease? Or should I be hiring someone for that?

As for privacy - yes, that's part of the thinking, maybe 30% of the equation. 70% is for sound -- even if for a marginal sound dampening/reflecting.

As for the clearance on the left and right, I think the tracks are about 78" on average. If I placed the track on the left, that would bring it to about the midpoint of the beam to the right of the door. I think that should be ok.

*edit* - Wow, I just realized that Home Depot does carry what I need! Check this out (and it has glass for light to boot!):
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Milliken-...0142/301423331
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post #16 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 10:05 PM
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Hello Echolocate,

Quote:
When I'm getting ready in the morning, the sound pours through the open doorway to the bedroom where my wife is sleeping.
I'm not sure you are going to get that much of a decimal reduction with this type of door? You will get at least 50% reduction, but those window openings are going to need glazing also. Again, your GC should be able to give you a fair price for that. I wouldn't recommend that for a DIYer, unless well tooled and experienced.

Quote:
What are my options? Do I look for a guy with a woodshop that can glue together large vertical slabs of decent wood? Do I buy something pre-fab? Are there wood fabricators that do one-off projects? Something like Home Depot won't work because the pre-fab doors aren't tall enough.
As you know now...Home Depot does carry this and there are several mail order varieties as well...Custom doors like this are going to start well above $500 and that's just getting a competent Custom Finish Carpenter-Cabinet Maker to do the work. Most likely closer to $1000. I do have questions why your GC can't help you out with this...???...That is not reassuring at all...

Quote:
My general contractor just shrugged his shoulders and couldn't offer me any wisdom. I'm in the Northwest burbs of Illinois.
Not a good sign...Sorry that is happening to you...
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post #17 of 17 Old 03-26-2017, 10:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by echolocate View Post
When you say "easily glassed in," how easy? Is it something an ordinary DIY'er can do with custom cut glass and a little elbow grease? Or should I be hiring someone for that?

As for privacy - yes, that's part of the thinking, maybe 30% of the equation. 70% is for sound -- even if for a marginal sound dampening/reflecting.

As for the clearance on the left and right, I think the tracks are about 78" on average. If I placed the track on the left, that would bring it to about the midpoint of the beam to the right of the door. I think that should be ok.

*edit* - Wow, I just realized that Home Depot does carry what I need! Check this out (and it has glass for light to boot!):
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Milliken-...0142/301423331
The entire project of installing a pocket door and glass in the openings above is something we could help you do. We could walk you through it and the first step would be to determine which way the ceiling joist run. If they are running parallel with that wall it would make it a lot easier. If they are running perpendicular to the wall then that wall is supporting the ceiling and the upstairs if there is any. You would literally have to remove everything all the way to the ceiling and reframe it for a larger opening. This would mean if it's a bearing wall you would have to construct a temporary wall on each side of that opening while you are making the modification. I know it sounds like an overwhelming project but if you take it step by step it's more grunt work than anything.
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