what is the best way to fix this mistake - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 08-16-2019, 08:40 PM Thread Starter
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what is the best way to fix this mistake

Hi I am doing through tenants for the first time and my measurements are a little off. I've got a little over 1/16 overhang on the ends of my mortise boards that I need to remove. I can think of a couple ways to fix this, but what is the best way to fix it. Thanks David
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Last edited by Haydman6; 08-16-2019 at 08:54 PM.
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post #2 of 18 Old 08-16-2019, 08:54 PM
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If the overhang is the only problem you could sand it off with a disc sander. You could also set up a straight edge and trim it off with a circular saw or router. I just wonder how the rail being more than a 16th out of position will affect the project.
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post #3 of 18 Old 08-17-2019, 03:29 AM
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Sharp jack plane.
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post #4 of 18 Old 08-17-2019, 06:32 AM
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Pull saw.


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post #5 of 18 Old 08-17-2019, 01:07 PM
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Table saw, spacer board against fence same width as outside of blade, overhang sits ahead of spacer, spacer and panel pushed through saw to cut off overhang.
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post #6 of 18 Old 08-17-2019, 01:13 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Or ......

If your fence will move over far enough to the right, use the spacer and run the left side of the work completely through the saw. This will trim a slight amount from that side making it a clean and flush cut. Then flip it around and trim off the other side minus the spacer.


That's what I'd do because I can on my saw.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #7 of 18 Old 08-17-2019, 04:37 PM Thread Starter
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Hey guys thanks for all the suggestions. I never considered using the tablesaw with the spacer, sounds like the easiest and probably cleanest way to get it done. Still learning my hand planes so little scared of that. Have a disc sander but it has 60 grit paper in it so that may be a little tough. Pull saw sounds like a good idea, Little worried about chip out on the end though. Top will have a rabbit inside, so I can cut a deeper rabbit to account from my error. In woodworking for 40 years as a hobby. Just built my dream shop and I want to Learn to do things the right way. The shop full of new machines are useless if my skills arenít improving. Thanks David
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post #8 of 18 Old 08-17-2019, 05:04 PM
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Skill comes with practice and we all learn by our mistakes, sometimes even how to cover them up. 😊
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post #9 of 18 Old 08-18-2019, 04:29 PM
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Hi David,

I would share, as a traditional woodworker, that your "mistake" is actually the proper way many such projects are done to begin with...so...as such not a mistake at all!

The "trimming" is done after construction or "test assembly" (if any?) and typically done with a hand saw "close" to ideal and then "finished" with a plane...usually of the "jointer" family as the most common...
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post #10 of 18 Old 08-19-2019, 11:57 AM
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I usually wedge thru tenons. Pinning the tenons will add a huge amount of strength to a door.
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post #11 of 18 Old 08-19-2019, 12:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
Skill comes with practice and we all learn by our mistakes, sometimes even how to cover them up. ��

Putty and paint . . . . If it were mine, I'd shave it off with a flush cut saw and be thankful if that's the only thing wrong.

As for your disc sander being 60 grit......you're aware that you can buy a whole plethora of grits, right?.....just making sure . ......

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post #12 of 18 Old 08-19-2019, 01:41 PM
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1. Looks like a good job on that mortise/tenon!

2. Don't be afraid of that hand plane! Just take a few passes, check for square, and repeat until it's flush.

3. I'd be scared to put a finished piece on a table saw. A table saw is much more likely to chew up your work than any hand plane could.
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post #13 of 18 Old 08-19-2019, 04:55 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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I had to laugh ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by AwesomeOpossum74 View Post
1. Looks like a good job on that mortise/tenon!

2. Don't be afraid of that hand plane! Just take a few passes, check for square, and repeat until it's flush.

3. I'd be scared to put a finished piece on a table saw. A table saw is much more likely to chew up your work than any hand plane could.

Well Opossum, you just go right ahead and plane away, but avoid the tear out when your plane hits the ends grain on the far side of the stroke.


Me, I'm running the "finished" piece right through the table saw like it's just another workpiece. However, I will put a sacrificial piece across the end to minimize tearout. It will NOT chew up work faster IF you know how to use it and after 50 years, I feel pretty comfortable with mine.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #14 of 18 Old 08-19-2019, 06:26 PM
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I make all my frame and panel assemblies 4mm oversized in each direction and trim each side around 2mm on the table saw to ensure squareness and final dimensions. With a good blade and a backer strip on any cross cuts to prevent tear out youíre good to go. The table saw is your friend.
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post #15 of 18 Old 08-20-2019, 01:01 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the tips and advice I sure need them. Was making some angled tendons today and I messed up on them twice before I finally got it right. I surely hope Iím learning from all of mistakes I seem to make a lot of them. Maybe his old age I donít know. The good thing is Iím retired so I have lots of time to figure them out. I hoped that the top-of-the-line equipment and top-of-the-line tools would make things easier, but its the human factor thatís killing me and my projects.
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post #16 of 18 Old 08-20-2019, 03:12 PM
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Quote:
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Well Opossum, you just go right ahead and plane away, but avoid the tear out when your plane hits the ends grain on the far side of the stroke.
From the pics, it looks like he could plane inward until the mortise rail is flush with the tenon rail, which would prevent breakout. Alternatively, a sacrificial piece could be clamped to the outside and he could plane outward. At 1/16" it would not take many strokes to flush.

I wasn't trying to knock down the table saw technique, but I don't consider a table/circular/jig saw to be a finishing tool. He must be careful about the saw settings, else he risks marring the tenon rail. That is where hand tools, or at least sanding tools come in.

I suppose it also depends on what tools each of us has available. Quality and maintenance also play a role. If your saw wiggles at all, doesn't keep settings, or the blade isn't sharp, it'll ruin an otherwise good cut.
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post #17 of 18 Old 08-20-2019, 03:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haydman6 View Post
Thanks for all the tips and advice I sure need them. Was making some angled tendons today and I messed up on them twice before I finally got it right. I surely hope Iím learning from all of mistakes I seem to make a lot of them. Maybe his old age I donít know. The good thing is Iím retired so I have lots of time to figure them out. I hoped that the top-of-the-line equipment and top-of-the-line tools would make things easier, but its the human factor thatís killing me and my projects.
Don't fret it. I'm amateur, and I make plenty of "mistakes". I'm sure there are a lot of pros here who still make imperfect measurements and cuts. Many mistakes can be hidden/made imperceptible in some fashion, and no one will never know if you don't tell them.
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post #18 of 18 Old 08-23-2019, 12:55 AM
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Just for the record, there are a couple of ways to prevent tear-out. First, you could use a razor knife or a sharp chisel and score the end at the final cut location. 1/32" - 1/16" deep. Go deeper if you're hand planing the end grain. If using a table saw with a crosscut sled, using a good quality blade will not give you tear out. I use Freud's industrial line cut-off blade, 80 tooth ATB. No tear-outs.


And if I had to flush that up, I would use either the crosscut sled on the table saw, or the chop saw. I am assuming this is only dry fit at present, so that it can be disassembled to make the cut. If it's already glued, I would set up a straight edge and trim it with a router and straight bit. You guys can talk all you want about what a snap it is to hand plane end grain. Have at it.
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