Whİch software is the best ??? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 12:07 PM Thread Starter
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Whİch software is the best ???

Hi guys...


I use T-Square ruler,90 degree ruler,rotring rapido pen and tracing paper for (Woodworking) technical drawing...

I am drawing in 4 hours with classical method...

My friend is drawing in half hour with computer...

I want to learn drawing program...which program easy to learn???

I want to use technology...which program do you use for woodworking???

a)AutoCad

b)SketchUp

c)Solidworks

d)3D Studio Max

e)None of them

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post #2 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 12:33 PM
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I guess it depends on what you're drawing and what you're printing to, assuming you're printing. Fusion 360 is an Autodesk product like AutoCAD and it is free for hobbyists and small businesses earning less than $100k per year. There are tons of videos to help you get started, as well.

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post #3 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 04:40 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by difalkner View Post
I guess it depends on what you're drawing and what you're printing to, assuming you're printing. Fusion 360 is an Autodesk product like AutoCAD and it is free for hobbyists and small businesses earning less than $100k per year. There are tons of videos to help you get started, as well.



David
Thank you very much for your answer David... Fusion 360? I ve added to my to try list... what do you think about AutoCAD???


I will go to second university on may... I will be college student... AutoCAD is free for college student...a lot of my friends are using AutoCAD... They can help me ...

What do you think about my try list ???

1)AutoCAD

2)Fusion 360

3)SketchUp

Thank you very much for your help David....





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post #4 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 04:48 PM
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A lot of CNC guys use AutoCAD. My niece is an HVAC designer and she uses AutoCAD daily, has for years. I guess it also depends on what your desired output is as to which software you choose. For me I need the CAM portion to go along with my CNC. I don't believe AutoCAD has a built in CAM but has to hand that off to other software. But if you're just printing or viewing on the screen then AutoCAD is excellent.

SketchUp has become very powerful but I haven't used it in years. I see some incredible work by people very proficient in SketchUp.

I would try whatever is free first and then see what you like. If both AutoCAD and Fusion 360 are free then use both. SketchUp used to be free - is it still? It might also be a factor if you're swapping files with others. Staying with the same platform is often helpful.

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post #5 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 06:04 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by difalkner View Post
A lot of CNC guys use AutoCAD. My niece is an HVAC designer and she uses AutoCAD daily, has for years. I guess it also depends on what your desired output is as to which software you choose. For me I need the CAM portion to go along with my CNC. I don't believe AutoCAD has a built in CAM but has to hand that off to other software. But if you're just printing or viewing on the screen then AutoCAD is excellent.



SketchUp has become very powerful but I haven't used it in years. I see some incredible work by people very proficient in SketchUp.



I would try whatever is free first and then see what you like. If both AutoCAD and Fusion 360 are free then use both. SketchUp used to be free - is it still? It might also be a factor if you're swapping files with others. Staying with the same platform is often helpful.



David
Thanks again for sharing your experiences with us David.....

I hope i can learn...

Best Regards....

FAİTH MICHEL

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post #6 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 07:36 PM
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Sketchup is still free...I recommend it mainly because my clients can then easily look at a project with the "free version" while the "pro version" has many more features. We do all our designing, and blueprinting with it.

I agree with David, that its what you get use to and what works for you best.

Sketchup, thus far, has met every single need. I don't do 3D printing or CNC work, but know those that do, and they use Sketchup as well...but don't ask me to explain how...Maybe David could...???
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post #7 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 09:51 PM
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Go to YouTube and search for Lars Christensen. He's an excellent Fusion 360 teacher and you can see quickly if it fits your needs.

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post #8 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 10:06 PM
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I'd suggest AutoCAD, I think the way it works might make more sense to you versus the 3D aspect of Sketchup. Though many folks claim Sketchup is easy, I never got the hang of it. I've used Studio Max for 10 years, it's pricey and will have a bigger learning curve in my opinion. It's more for folks looking to render high quality objects/scenes rather than quick prototyping.
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post #9 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 10:54 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks all for your advices... I will try...

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post #10 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 10:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phaelax View Post
I'd suggest AutoCAD, I think the way it works might make more sense to you versus the 3D aspect of Sketchup. Though many folks claim Sketchup is easy, I never got the hang of it. I've used Studio Max for 10 years, it's pricey and will have a bigger learning curve in my opinion. It's more for folks looking to render high quality objects/scenes rather than quick prototyping.
I'm kind of lost with that advise...???

Do you use AutoCAD or only have thoughts about it? I teach (taught) Sketchup to each of my clients for viewing in usually less than a cup of coffee, and to 5th Graders to actually do basic designs, as well as entire basic timber frame rendering to Middle and High School students, and the feedback I get is that its way easier.

I fully admit that my experience with AutoCAD is very limited...mainly because I'm "old school" and preferred drafting and drawing to CAD...so when I did try it, it was just too complicated...at least for me. Then Sketchup came along and it was free. My first time with it learning was being taught to me by a 6th grader on a Mac to draw a flower...way more "user friendly" and basic than my experience with AutoCAD...not to mention the serious price tag for the pro version and all the add-ons...

I know nothing of Studio Max, other than it is way more expensive, but perhaps its easier? I can't speak to that...
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post #11 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 11:15 PM
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I've used AutoCAD a little in the past, far from capable of teaching it to anyone. I think I'm too accustomed to Studio Max and that's why I struggled with Sketchup. But I was saying, most people I know find Sketchup very easy to use, I'm just an odd exception apparently. It's like when folks tell me to use Gimp but I've used Photoshop for close to 20 years and thus find it infinitely easier to use.

I suggested AutoCAD because I believe the results to be more precise for designing technical blueprints, plus it's kind of an industry standard. I don't know many professional jobs asking for sketchup. But I have minimal experience with either so maybe I'm wrong.

What I would NOT recommend for a hobbyist is StudioMax, due to price. As an alternative, there is Blender. It's been around awhile, free, and well supported. But it all depends on if he wants to do 3D modeling, or make reference designs.


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My friend is drawing in half hour with computer...
What does your friend use?
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post #12 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 11:20 PM
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AutoCAD is an extremely powerful tool and is widely accepted as the industry standard for architecture firms, but I think learning it on your own would be a challenge. I took a full semester college class to learn it.
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post #13 of 22 Old 01-24-2019, 11:43 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phaelax View Post
I've used AutoCAD a little in the past, far from capable of teaching it to anyone. I think I'm too accustomed to Studio Max and that's why I struggled with Sketchup. But I was saying, most people I know find Sketchup very easy to use, I'm just an odd exception apparently. It's like when folks tell me to use Gimp but I've used Photoshop for close to 20 years and thus find it infinitely easier to use.



I suggested AutoCAD because I believe the results to be more precise for designing technical blueprints, plus it's kind of an industry standard. I don't know many professional jobs asking for sketchup. But I have minimal experience with either so maybe I'm wrong.



What I would NOT recommend for a hobbyist is StudioMax, due to price. As an alternative, there is Blender. It's been around awhile, free, and well supported. But it all depends on if he wants to do 3D modeling, or make reference designs.







What does your friend use?
My friend use AutoCAD.... he is professional maker and engineer...

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post #14 of 22 Old 01-25-2019, 12:28 AM
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Originally Posted by phaelax View Post
I've used AutoCAD a little in the past, far from capable of teaching it to anyone. I think I'm too accustomed to Studio Max and that's why I struggled with Sketchup. But I was saying, most people I know find Sketchup very easy to use, I'm just an odd exception apparently. It's like when folks tell me to use Gimp but I've used Photoshop for close to 20 years and thus find it infinitely easier to use...I suggested AutoCAD because I believe the results to be more precise for designing technical blueprints, plus it's kind of an industry standard. I don't know many professional jobs asking for sketchup. But I have minimal experience with either so maybe I'm wrong...What I would NOT recommend for a hobbyist is StudioMax, due to price. As an alternative, there is Blender. It's been around awhile, free, and well supported. But it all depends on if he wants to do 3D modeling, or make reference designs...
What does your friend use?
Thank's Phaelax,

I didn't mean for my post to sound so challenging (on re-read) and would offer that you probably (?most likely actually) have more "computer savvy" than I do.

What I can share "professionally" as an Architectural Designer" (I'm not an Architect by collegian training, nor wish to be) is:

1. Sketchup is more detailed (1000ths of a millimeter or smaller) than most structural designer's would ever need.

2. Our PE use Auto CAD, Solid Works and Sketchup...There go to these days for blue printing and interfacing with most clients (Timberwrights for the most part) is Sketchup...

3. All our blue prints are generated by Sketchup (this is the pro version however)

What I actually "think" from many such conversations is this: one has to understand the budgetary needs of a system in the long run, what there clients may (or may not) be able to use or afford, and what is then easiest for them to learn. Its a spectrum for sure, and for me and most areas I work in from education to architecture Sketchup has more than met the need accross the board, but I will own that is a bias because it is everywhere in my daily world from 5th grade class rooms, to libraries, and most of my collegues use it for design work...here and overseas...

Go with what fits you needs for sure!!!
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post #15 of 22 Old 01-25-2019, 06:55 AM
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Will you have access to AutoCad after university? If not, one of the free ones would be best. And like the others above have said, it depends on what you are using it for.
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post #16 of 22 Old 01-25-2019, 07:15 AM
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I guess it depends on what you're drawing and what you're printing to, assuming you're printing. Fusion 360 is an Autodesk product like AutoCAD and it is free for hobbyists and small businesses earning less than $100k per year. There are tons of videos to help you get started, as well.

David

David, can you share how hobbyists get Fusion 360 for free. I don’t see a reference to free copies on their site other than for students and educators.
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post #17 of 22 Old 01-25-2019, 08:18 AM
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Autocad mechanical is a good piece of software. I have used it for a few years no 3D in the version I was using, although I use autocad electrical daily not mechanical but the commands mostly go hand in hand.
I'm sure you can find an older version of mechanical like 2010 or so that will be cheaper. A seat for the newest version is not the cheapest. Like others have said there are plenty of free softwares out there.
A machinest at my work uses Bobcad, which is a cad/cam software, I think it's a good alternative to a more expensive cad/cam like mastercam.
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post #18 of 22 Old 01-25-2019, 08:30 AM
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David, can you share how hobbyists get Fusion 360 for free. I don’t see a reference to free copies on their site other than for students and educators.
It's been a while since I set mine up but from what I recall you do the download, register, and there is a link or checkbox or some indicator where you define whether you're buying, a student, small business, etc. and I just followed the link to verify I earn less than $100k per year.

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post #19 of 22 Old 01-25-2019, 08:42 AM
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A machinest at my work uses Bobcad, which is a cad/cam software, I think it's a good alternative to a more expensive cad/cam like mastercam.
Be very careful if you go the BobCAD route. It can get very expensive in the long run, especially if you need support. Disclaimer - I've never used it but on the CNC forums I read about it all the time, so this isn't first-hand experience.

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post #20 of 22 Old 01-25-2019, 07:41 PM
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i learned manual drafting in high school and autocad in college. if your in school take a class in autocad, it's not intuitive for self teaching, but very versatile for drawing. i only use 2d, as that's how my mind works :)

forget bobcad, we bought a plasma table with bobcad. pretty worthless for technical work, the artists seem to like it.
i export autocad dxf files to a cam program just fine
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