Walnut Parson Table Project - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 34 Old 02-20-2013, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by TimPa View Post
i am not explaining myself well. if the table expands say 1/4" (perpindicular to the grain), and the bread board edge does not (because this board is in a long grain position), you will have a difference in dimension of 1/4".
Sorry to be so stuborn... I see the point now... I was focusing on the gap inside the mortise. But of course the overall lenght between the end and field of the table will vary. I get it now. Not sure that would keep me from doing a breadboard end. But I see your point.
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post #22 of 34 Old 02-20-2013, 10:50 AM
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If you don't want it to move, might I suggest making your table out of stone... or perhaps metal? Wood expands, contracts, twists, and does all kinds of unpredictable stuff. I'd say that walnut is going to look stellar and breadboards are the traditional solution to keep the surface flat. This also gives an opportunity to throw another color of wood in there as a design element. Have you thought about pinning your breadboard (if you do a breadboard) with lighter or darker hardwood dowels? I look forward to seeing the solution to the table.
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post #23 of 34 Old 02-20-2013, 12:56 PM Thread Starter
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Wow, you guys are killing me....ha. I thought I knew the direction I wanted to go here, but after all your input I need to reconsider how I am going to deals with the ends. The miter cut is out and a breadboard is in. Just need to think through how to do this. I am not that skilled with a router to do a blind mortise but may have to learn. Thanks for all the great input. You've saved me a lot of future problems.
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post #24 of 34 Old 02-20-2013, 01:01 PM
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Wow, you guys are killing me....ha. I thought I knew the direction I wanted to go here, but after all your input I need to reconsider how I am going to deals with the ends. The miter cut is out and a breadboard is in. Just need to think through how to do this. I am not that skilled with a router to do a blind mortise but may have to learn. Thanks for all the great input. You've saved me a lot of future problems.
Nice, you're making the right call. With a router table, it shouldn't be too hard (easy for me say, haven't tried it yet). Without a table I think I would set my board to be mortised on edge and clamp several other boards to either side to give a flat surface. Then use an edge guide and stop blocks to control where the mortise goes. Take several little passes until you get the depth you're looking for.

I think it was Firemedic who did a great how to on a breadboard edge on this forum. Search for it. Great detail on how to peg the ends.

Last edited by LearnByDoing; 02-20-2013 at 01:04 PM.
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post #25 of 34 Old 03-02-2013, 12:45 PM Thread Starter
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I need some advice. From previous discussions here, I've filled the center of the legs with some scrap wood. Not a perfect fit, but about 1/8th to 1/16th open around that center filler board. Glue from my miter joint is making it difficult to get a perfect fit. I'd like to get his solid all the way down. Would pouring down some substance like epoxy or glue down this gap make sense?

2nd question. I've put a corner bracket on to help support the leg and I was thinking to cut off the center filler by six inches and fill the top six inches of the void with epoxy to secure a bold that is coming through the bracket.

Let me know what you think.
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post #26 of 34 Old 03-03-2013, 10:25 AM
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Epoxy is a good gap filler. How do you intend to retighten that bolt when it becomes loose once the end is filled in?

Those who say it cannot be done should stay out of the way of the people doing it.
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post #27 of 34 Old 03-03-2013, 11:46 AM
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If the block in the photo is just stuck in there for show, pull it out cut a small 45 bevel on the edges of the filler blocks so you can get it down into the walnut leg if the glue is in the way.

If that block is glued into the leg on the cheeks it should be plenty strong to hold the hanger bolt for the leg.

In some of this thread people are talking about the table expanding and contracting in a bread board end. I can't imagine it changing by a 1/4" during the course of a year unless you live in a climate subject to humidity extremes and no heat or AC. I have an oak kitchen table with breadboard ends I built 8 years ago and in the summer it grows not quite a 1/32 past the ends, right now its shrunken not quite a 1/32 in the ends.

When you make the breadboard end piece you can router in the dado or cut it in with a saw or dado head and chop the mortices square with a chisel.
You also don't want to run a full dado, maybe two so there is some wood at the center holding the top and bottom of the breadboard together. The end gets pinned on to the tennon.
Firemedic posted a tutorial on breadbord ends-
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/b...d-tools-32653/

Look at the photos esp. where they show slotted grrove for the outer pins. I didn't run the dado all the way through like he did, but his table is a little more rustic than the one I built.
Cut haunches on the end or the tennon and don't run the dado all the way through so you don't see the tennon. Pin the tennon onto the mortice and don't glue it of you can just glue a small portion in the center to let the table field expand and contract

The clips from Rockler would work OK to attach the top, I used some aluminum Z in a similar fashion.

My kitchen table-
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post #28 of 34 Old 03-15-2013, 12:06 AM Thread Starter
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Latest update. I finished the legs. Filled the gap around the center piece of wood in the legs with epoxy. Worked out great. Had a few places where the epoxy oozed out from a knot or crack. Not a problem, I just put a little duct tape over it until it was dry. Felt good that I probably really strengthened these up. Then i flipped them over and put a 3/8 inch layer of epoxy for the bottom. i added a handful of walnut particles to the epoxy from the dust collector to darken it. Now onto finishing. Picture of the dry fit and then disassembled for stain and finish. Tried several stains but ended up using a min wax stain. For the finish I am using Epifanes. The final two coats will be their rubbed satin finish. The last pic is just the first coat after staining the top. Several more coats and then I can put it together and start using it.
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post #29 of 34 Old 03-15-2013, 10:44 AM
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Looks great. How did the bread board ends work out? I see you went with individual mortises rather than one long slot. Either way should work fine. Just wondering how hard cutting the M&T was. Once I get my built-ins done, a kitchen table is next on the list.
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post #30 of 34 Old 03-29-2013, 08:37 AM Thread Starter
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Well here it is. Not 100% happy with the table finish. i used a sprayer and have some small bumps here and there. Since i don't have a finish room i am sure some dust particles made it on the surface. Is there a technique to do a final coat to eliminate? Or maybe even some buffing?
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post #31 of 34 Old 03-29-2013, 08:45 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LearnByDoing
Looks great. How did the bread board ends work out? I see you went with individual mortises rather than one long slot. Either way should work fine. Just wondering how hard cutting the M&T was. Once I get my built-ins done, a kitchen table is next on the list.
I adapted a little on this. If you look close I cut in joiner biscuit slots. I glued the biscuits to the breadboard and then glued the center three biscuits to the table. I also glued the bread board down to the rail and leg tops. I am happy that it was a tight fit to the table. The biscuit cut into the table is larger than the biscuit so it will allow for expansion as it occurs. Time will tell how effective this will be.
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post #32 of 34 Old 03-29-2013, 01:28 PM
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Looks Great. I'm sure someone will chime in with finish ideas. Not sure what you used but if some type of poly, consider sanding down your rough spots and nubs with 220. After final coat, sand down with at least 400 wet sand paper and Rub out with some 4-O steel wool. Will give you a pretty smooth finish.
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post #33 of 34 Old 03-29-2013, 02:52 PM
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Good looking table!

Novice with an attitude
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post #34 of 34 Old 04-04-2013, 12:46 PM
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Great looking table! Like the wood choice and the finish really makes the grains pop. Simple design but well made. Great job!
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