Walnut Parson Table Project - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 34 Old 02-10-2013, 10:20 PM Thread Starter
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Walnut Parson Table Project-image-3961039909.jpg

Here is my table.....well at least the starting point. Bought this load of 10 footers for $80. 8-10" wide and mostly 5/4

I've planed them down and ripped them down to the sizes I need.

I couldn't find 3 1/2 x 3 1/2 Walnut pieces for the legs so I used a miter router bit and joined pieces together to make the legs. After the glue cured, I ran them through the drum sander. I am ready now to build the frame.


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I'd like some feedback here. Since they are not solid as you can see, I want to make sure they are solid when I attach the frame pieces. I was thinking about pouring in epoxy down the center about 4 inches. That would allow me to connect the frame to the top of the leg and be assured a solid source to connect to. Also I am not putting any leg braces at the bottom, so there could be a lot of side pressure if you try to move the table without picking it up. I'd rather not have a leg crack and break at the top. My problem is I usually over engineer so I may not need to do this at all, but that is where you all come in. Let me know what you think.

Last edited by kelsky; 02-10-2013 at 10:46 PM.
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post #2 of 34 Old 02-10-2013, 10:54 PM
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I would cut up some other hardwood and make a "peg" that fits inside the hollow of the leg, about 6" long or more and glue one in the top and bottom of each leg. Kind of like fitting a square peg into a square hole. Make the peg longer if the apron is going to be bigger than 6". That might not be the best advice, but if I was building a table, that's what I would do.

Looks good, keep the pictures coming and let us know what you would do differently. I like learning from other people's mistakes/discoveries.
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post #3 of 34 Old 02-10-2013, 11:09 PM
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Exactly right. My father would take and cut pine to fit in his legs.
The entire leg, not just where a mortise was going. He would cut it
with just enough room for a good coating of glue at the bottom 1/3
and slide it in, the glue would work it's way up as it was slid in place.

And wow! nice pile of boards for $80.
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post #4 of 34 Old 02-10-2013, 11:49 PM
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Why not put a wooden plug in the top, about 2 3/4 square, and attach the frame pieces to that? If those legs are properly glued, I shouldn't think they are likely to fall apart when you move the table. How big is it going to be, and if you are using a wooden top, how will you allow for expansion/

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post #5 of 34 Old 02-11-2013, 09:12 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the suggestions. The table top is going to be 72 x 42. I'll be using 3/4" boards 3 1/2 Wide running the length of the table. I am going to route the 12 boards needed with a glue joint in them and join them with glue. Underneath I was planning on having cross bars about a foot apart and pocket screws up to the top. I felt this served two purposes: (1) structural and (2) to keep the top as level as possible. Do you see issues with expansion with this setup?
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post #6 of 34 Old 02-11-2013, 10:07 PM
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Trailer load of lumber for $80. I'm so busy appreciating your score I can't focus on the project.

Yet.
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post #7 of 34 Old 02-12-2013, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kelsky View Post
Thanks for the suggestions. The table top is going to be 72 x 42. I'll be using 3/4" boards 3 1/2 Wide running the length of the table. I am going to route the 12 boards needed with a glue joint in them and join them with glue. Underneath I was planning on having cross bars about a foot apart and pocket screws up to the top. I felt this served two purposes: (1) structural and (2) to keep the top as level as possible. Do you see issues with expansion with this setup?

Not sure exactly what you are describing for the top. But I don't think you're on the right track. I don't think you need the glue joint, flat jointed faces should glue up fine. As for attaching the top to the base, you dont want to screw it down to any perpendicular members without allowing for movement of the wood. The table top will expand/contract mostly accross the grain. So the attachement method should allow for this. A common method would be clips (see pic) that screw to table top bottom and are slid into a saw kerf on the inside of a table rail.
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post #8 of 34 Old 02-13-2013, 07:04 PM Thread Starter
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Awesome. Thx. I found them on Rockler. However, they don't specify spacing. From your experience, how far apart do you space them? They also have the kerf mounted corner brackets that I need too.
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post #9 of 34 Old 02-13-2013, 08:32 PM
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18 to 24 inches should be fine. Maybe 3 on each long side. One or two either end.
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post #10 of 34 Old 02-16-2013, 01:23 AM Thread Starter
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Here is the latest. The top boards have been routed with a glue joint bit. I spent 15 minutes getting it as close to perfect as possible. I pretty much nailed it. Then started routing and in no time, I was done. Then to do a test fit. I was very pleased. Good tight joints. Just final cuts to length and I am ready to glue it up. The longer boards on each end will have a 45 miter with an end board to match.
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post #11 of 34 Old 02-19-2013, 12:00 PM
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Very pretty. My concern with your plan for the top is that expansion of boards in the field will speperate or split your miters on the 45deg end pieces. the traditional way to handle the is a breadboard edge which allows for expansion/contraction of the top, helps keep the top from bowing/warping, and also provides that perpendicular element you're looking for. There are some tutorials on this site and youtube on how to do a BB edge if your're interested. But your table looks great. I would love to try working with walnut.
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post #12 of 34 Old 02-19-2013, 12:16 PM
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personally, i would not recommend a border frame or breadboard. a table that wide is going to move considerably with seasonal (humidity) change. although a breadboard keeps the boards aligned in a plane, it will show a disparity while doing that. in other words if that table contracts 1/4", you will have the breadboard edge hanging "out" 1/8", etc.. doesn't belong on a finished table in my opinion

make sure to seal both sides equally.
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post #13 of 34 Old 02-19-2013, 12:23 PM
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I recommend a bread board edge to stabilize and add a finished element to the project. Looks great btw.

Those who say it cannot be done should stay out of the way of the people doing it.
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post #14 of 34 Old 02-19-2013, 12:47 PM
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re Breadboards:
i like the breadboards and would definitely use them. It is correct that there will be a 1/8 inch or so difference (hopefully the breadboard longer) in the winter. the overall look of the breadboards will be more refined/finished than the exposed long end grain. the Bonus of helping to hold the top flat makes it worth the effort IMO.
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post #15 of 34 Old 02-19-2013, 04:55 PM
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personally, i would not recommend a border frame or breadboard. a table that wide is going to move considerably with seasonal (humidity) change. although a breadboard keeps the boards aligned in a plane, it will show a disparity while doing that. in other words if that table contracts 1/4", you will have the breadboard edge hanging "out" 1/8", etc.. doesn't belong on a finished table in my opinion

make sure to seal both sides equally.
I'm affraid this doesn't make any sense to me. For a breadboard end you COULD slot the breadboard end so that the side of the tennon is visable. If you did this, the expansion and contraction would be visible. But this is not the classic method and would certainly leave a rustic look.

But if the breadboard is mortised rather than a full slot through the side, and the tennon is notched on the ends, any expansion/contraction should not be visable. And this is the traditional way of doing the breadboard end.

Please correct me if I'm wrong as I'm contemplating a table project in the near future.
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post #16 of 34 Old 02-19-2013, 06:21 PM
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Originally Posted by LearnByDoing View Post
I'm affraid this doesn't make any sense to me. For a breadboard end you COULD slot the breadboard end so that the side of the tennon is visable. If you did this, the expansion and contraction would be visible. But this is not the classic method and would certainly leave a rustic look.

But if the breadboard is mortised rather than a full slot through the side, and the tennon is notched on the ends, any expansion/contraction should not be visable. And this is the traditional way of doing the breadboard end.

Please correct me if I'm wrong as I'm contemplating a table project in the near future.
please realize that the grain of the taple is perpindicular to the grain of the bread board. the tabls is going to expand and contract much more in the sideways direction than the breadboard,as it will be long wise.
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post #17 of 34 Old 02-19-2013, 09:08 PM
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please realize that the grain of the taple is perpindicular to the grain of the bread board. the tabls is going to expand and contract much more in the sideways direction than the breadboard,as it will be long wise.
I do realize it. In fact I was the one to point it out earlier. But how does that make what you said true? A blind tennon into the breadboard edge will prevent the movement from being visible.
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post #18 of 34 Old 02-20-2013, 07:59 AM
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i am not explaining myself well. if the table expands say 1/4" (perpindicular to the grain), and the bread board edge does not (because this board is in a long grain position), you will have a difference in dimension of 1/4".
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post #19 of 34 Old 02-20-2013, 09:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kelsky View Post


Here is my table.....well at least the starting point. Bought this load of 10 footers for $80. 8-10" wide and mostly 5/4

I've planed them down and ripped them down to the sizes I need.

I couldn't find 3 1/2 x 3 1/2 Walnut pieces for the legs so I used a miter router bit and joined pieces together to make the legs. After the glue cured, I ran them through the drum sander. I am ready now to build the frame.
Some assemble required

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
Finishing is 3 parts chemistry and 1 part VooDoo http://lrgwood.com
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post #20 of 34 Old 02-20-2013, 10:11 AM
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RE Breadboard:
As Timpa says the change in dimension will show a bit. With blind mortise it is less noticable but an "ideal breadboard would be the same length as the width of the table. With movement the table width will be ~1/4 inch less than the breadboard in dry season. This does Not significantly detract from the overal look of the table and is almost not noticeable.
Bob
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