Walnut herringbone dining table - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 04-03-2016, 03:28 PM Thread Starter
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Walnut herringbone dining table

Hi everyone,
I'm new to the forum and working on a dining table and have a few questions I thought some of you might be able to help me with.

First of all, the table is 42"x80" and will have a metal legs. The top is going to be a herringbone pattern of 2"x12" walnut strips about 3/8" thick. My first question is: what would you use for a subsurface to put the pattern on that will keep the final product from bending at all? I will have a strip of maple around the outside edge which will provide some stability. My current plan is to use a sheet of 1/2" 9-ply birch plywood sheet to attach the walnut strips to. I would also use 3 pine 1x4s to run the length of the table under the plywood. Is this enough stability for a table that will probably approach 200 pounds with the legs on it?

Secondly, how would you go about securing the herringbone pattern? I'm thinking that a bed of glue and clamping should hold them down well enough, but should I also toenail one side of the boards as I go? We move a fair amount and I would hate for the table to expand and pop if it's in storage for a while.

Finally, my current plan is to use waterlox finish on the table. Anyone have experience with this as far as ease of application/durability?

Thanks so much!

Jim
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post #2 of 8 Old 04-03-2016, 05:04 PM
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The problem you will have gluing the pieces down to a substrate is as the glue dries and cures it will shrink and draw up making the substrate bow. Since you are working with 42"x80" you might screw a piece of plywood to the floor or a heavy work bench and do the middle and use resin glue. Resin glue will cure faster. Then allow the glue to dry for a week before removing the screws. Personally I think you would be better off using strips of veneer. Veneer wouldn't draw up as bad as 3/8" stock.
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post #3 of 8 Old 04-03-2016, 05:16 PM
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Built one with my Daughter, used an old door, we used glued, and pin nailed the pieces.

You can see the table here:

http://www.designsponge.com/2011/08/...ing-table.html
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post #4 of 8 Old 04-03-2016, 06:30 PM
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Use a glue that stays flexible once cured, I'd even consider using silicone, sounds mad but it sticks like **** and still allows movement. I've pulled skirting board off before that's been stuck with no nails and it came off easy but skirting that was stuck with silicone was a real pain in the arse it just stretched. Look into block board for the sub base I'm sure I read somewhere that it doesn't warp as much as ply but I may have just dreamt that.
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post #5 of 8 Old 04-04-2016, 01:55 PM Thread Starter
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I was curious about micro pinning the face. Your project was the inspiration for this actually! Unfortunately, finding a door that size is not exactly easy... Really don't want to deal with messing with the face nailing if I can avoid it. How noticeable are those tiny 23 gauge pins? Another option I've considered is doing solid boards screwed together as the substrate instead of plywood, but I'm concerned about the flexing in those solid boards. Or possible adding strip of angle steel the length of the table for added stability. That would make it quite a bit heavier though. Definitely looking into the resin glue. I'm not sure if I'll be able to screw it to the floor for a week, but I'll see what I can do...

Thanks for all the advice. I'll take any more I can get!

Jim
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post #6 of 8 Old 04-04-2016, 03:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Pleuss View Post
I was curious about micro pinning the face. Your project was the inspiration for this actually! Unfortunately, finding a door that size is not exactly easy... Really don't want to deal with messing with the face nailing if I can avoid it. How noticeable are those tiny 23 gauge pins? Another option I've considered is doing solid boards screwed together as the substrate instead of plywood, but I'm concerned about the flexing in those solid boards. Or possible adding strip of angle steel the length of the table for added stability. That would make it quite a bit heavier though. Definitely looking into the resin glue. I'm not sure if I'll be able to screw it to the floor for a week, but I'll see what I can do...

Thanks for all the advice. I'll take any more I can get!

Jim
That's great to hear, we had a great time building that table, it's held up quite well, with no issues from using wood glue. We honed our skills working together as well, I had to let it be her project, and offer advice as it was asked for.

We found that door at the Habitat for Humanity resale store, they had a lot of them.

The ash pieces came from my deceased neighbors shop. He was quite the collector, he had boxes of those. I have no idea where they came from, or what they were for but I can tell you he probably paid almost nothing for them. No one bought them at the sale, and I had them on my trailer to haul to the burn pile. Couldn't stand it so I pulled them off and saved them, glad I did. We did find that there was a slight variance in the length. Didn't discover it until we were well into the pattern. Caused us to adjust a little to get things back on track. Then we started checking the length to make sure it was right.

The 23ga pins are tiny, I set them deep, then my Daughter filled all of the holes. I've looked but can't see any that are exposed. She eventually put a couple of coats of clear urethane on the table to protect it from all of the things that happen to a dining room table...
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post #7 of 8 Old 04-05-2016, 12:59 PM Thread Starter
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I did look at the Restore for a table but they don't have any for the size of table we want. And lumber yards don't really carry block board (aka lumber core) around here. I think I'm going to use an 3/4" MDF sheet for the substrate with a 1x4 H-frame (layed flat) underneath for added stability, per a suggestion from a local wood shop. The 3" maple sides should give more stability as well. I think I'm going to try just using glue and clamping instead of face pinning it. I'm sure it will mean I can only do a few rows at a time, but I think that's worth it for me if it means I don't have to use a filler on top. I'm thinking maybe that will allow for a little more room for expansion/contraction due to humidity? Hopefully I won't regret that decision.

I'll welcome any other thoughts. Otherwise, I'll post some pictures when it's done... unless it turns out bad.
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post #8 of 8 Old 04-08-2016, 10:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Pleuss View Post
I did look at the Restore for a table but they don't have any for the size of table we want. And lumber yards don't really carry block board (aka lumber core) around here. I think I'm going to use an 3/4" MDF sheet for the substrate with a 1x4 H-frame (layed flat) underneath for added stability, per a suggestion from a local wood shop. The 3" maple sides should give more stability as well. I think I'm going to try just using glue and clamping instead of face pinning it. I'm sure it will mean I can only do a few rows at a time, but I think that's worth it for me if it means I don't have to use a filler on top. I'm thinking maybe that will allow for a little more room for expansion/contraction due to humidity? Hopefully I won't regret that decision.

I'll welcome any other thoughts. Otherwise, I'll post some pictures when it's done... unless it turns out bad.
Lumber core, never heard it called that before, mind u I'm from the U.K and we never use the word lumber it's weird coz I've noticed its used a lot on your side of the pond. I've touched on this before, in a previous thread, about all the different lingo, it can get quite confusing.
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