Walnut Bookcase Project - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 2Likes
  • 1 Post By Roybrew
  • 1 Post By GeorgeC
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 17 Old 09-03-2018, 12:34 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Roybrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 237
View Roybrew's Photo Album My Photos
Walnut Bookcase Project

This was formally know as "Got Plans. How Do I Start". Well I've started. With great advice from plenty of knowledgeable people on here, I took some advice and made a cutting list, I've never done that before, and started from there. I definitely do not have enough wood, figured this out with doing the math, more great advice received on here. The top will be 13.5 X 44, sides are 10.5 X 42. The 4 face frame pieces, and I'm going to do a decorative cove molding under the top overhang. Never made a cove molding before, so this is going to be interesting. Vaccum cleaner pipe works good for sanding cove. Got it all in my head. Not much room up there. Going to need more wood for bottom shelf and 2 more adjustable shelves, and I need to figure out what I want, oh I mean what my wife wants, for the back.
SwampRat likes this.
Roybrew is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 Old 09-03-2018, 01:10 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 161
View t.carpenter00's Photo Album My Photos
Cut lists are amazing. They give you opportunity to think the project out in your head, when it's quiet, before you start making things up as you work.

Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk
t.carpenter00 is offline  
post #3 of 17 Old 09-03-2018, 01:51 PM
Smart and Cool
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 1,712
View shoot summ's Photo Album My Photos
Nice job!!!

Always good to see someone take the advice and be productive with it.

One more piece of advice on your glue ups, I think I mentioned this in the other thread, look at all of the wood, and try to put pieces together that complement each other. Always look at both sides as well.

It's going to be pretty regardless, but a tight grained piece, with a fairly wild grained piece is going to create a visual "catch". Keeping them more similar makes it more pleasing to the eye(IMO) doesn't matter if one side is wild, and one isn't.

Just my opinion on how I always approach it, keep the progress rolling, great work so far.
shoot summ is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 17 Old 09-04-2018, 04:05 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Roybrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 237
View Roybrew's Photo Album My Photos
Thank you T.carpenter00, I've never made a cut list before, new ground for me.

Yes you are right shoot summ. I sort of jumped and glued that together, I've got to be a little more patient and smarter. I see what I get when I visit the sawmill for more. Maybe I can use the miss- matched grain for the shelves or maybe the back. Going to need about 16 BF for the back, if I use the sawmill lumber. Maybe be cheaper than ply wood.

Thanks for the encouragement.
Roybrew is online now  
post #5 of 17 Old 07-05-2019, 11:10 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Roybrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 237
View Roybrew's Photo Album My Photos
Wellll.... almost a year later and I'm getting back into it. Other pressing things get in the way.

I have remade a few pieces for better grain pattern, and I am now finish sanding before assembly.

I am trying to decide on a finish. No polyurethane, wifes orders. This is going to be for books, so I don't want anything that might have a detrimental effect on paper.

Open for suggestions and ideas. I'm very inexperienced when it comes to finishes. Thanks for any help.

Roy

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
Roybrew is online now  
post #6 of 17 Old 07-05-2019, 01:34 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Roybrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 237
View Roybrew's Photo Album My Photos
The finish I am trying to obtain would be something to make it show the grains and not darken the wood anymore than possible. I'm sure some darkening will happen when a finish is applied, and will darken with age. Sorry, I guess I should've mentioned that earlier. Maybe I'll get it done this year.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
Roybrew is online now  
post #7 of 17 Old 07-05-2019, 02:10 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,676
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
For walnut, I have just sprayed lacquer and nothing else. Looks very natural to me.


George
Tool Agnostic likes this.
GeorgeC is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to GeorgeC For This Useful Post:
Roybrew (07-05-2019)
post #8 of 17 Old 07-05-2019, 07:16 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Roybrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 237
View Roybrew's Photo Album My Photos
I have never sprayed lacquer before. I was thinking of a type of oil or wax, something I can hand rub. Lacquer sounds interesting, maybe another project.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
Roybrew is online now  
post #9 of 17 Old 07-07-2019, 02:54 AM
Nine Thumbs
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: The Very Tip of Lake Michigan
Posts: 282
View Shop_Rat's Photo Album My Photos
Oils or waxes can easily be absorbed into book fibers over time. I would suggest a hard coating that cannot wick into paper or bindings. Any quality varnish or lacquer will fit the bill, but I much prefer satin or very low luster urethanes, especially on projects that will come in contact with absorbent materials. For finer finishes I use a multiple wipe on technique to prevent a gloppy, uneven look. And again I stress satins or low lusters. Minwax makes a nice wipe on polyurethane that, if time is taken, will produce a super fine finish and will be superior to any oil or wax finish.

Out of curiosity, why the aversion to a urethane finish?

Another $000,000,000.02 worth of advice,
Mark
Shop_Rat is offline  
post #10 of 17 Old 07-07-2019, 07:12 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,992
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
If you allow it to dry a week you could use Watco Danish oil finish and it wouldn't transfer to books. Using any Danish oil finish the wood should be sanded to 320 grit or it takes many coats to do the job.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #11 of 17 Old 07-07-2019, 03:15 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,516
View Quickstep's Photo Album My Photos
Waterlox pops the grain in Walnut like nobody’s business, but it is rather dark.
Quickstep is offline  
post #12 of 17 Old 07-08-2019, 09:37 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: NE FL
Posts: 144
View DrRobert's Photo Album My Photos
You might want to consider dying or staining (yes) because walnut is know to fade with time. A tinted oil finish would probably do the same thing. Experiment on scrap before you commit yourself.



If you're short on lumber, you could go with walnut ply shelves & save on the solid wood.
DrRobert is offline  
post #13 of 17 Old 07-08-2019, 10:06 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 2,857
View TimPa's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roybrew View Post
and I need to figure out what I want, oh I mean what my wife wants, for the back.
very nice work in several areas Roy!

and, the best lesson you seemed to have learned (maybe not here)!
TimPa is offline  
post #14 of 17 Old 07-08-2019, 10:14 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,676
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrRobert View Post
You might want to consider dying or staining (yes) because walnut is know to fade with time. A tinted oil finish would probably do the same thing. Experiment on scrap before you commit yourself.



If you're short on lumber, you could go with walnut ply shelves & save on the solid wood.

I have never heard of walnut fading. Does it matter if in direct sun? or not?


George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #15 of 17 Old 07-11-2019, 08:00 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Roybrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 237
View Roybrew's Photo Album My Photos
Shop Rat I didnt mean to imply that I don't like polyurethanes. I've used the spar urathane on my canoe seat frames and it turns water like a duck. I've never used the wipe on like you mentioned, but maybe next project I'll try that, as slow as I get wood working done trees will be extinct.

Quickstep, the waterlox you mentioned is that the tung oil? How different is the tung oil from the Danish oil that Steve Neul sugested?

Thanks TimPa, I enjoy making things.

DrRobert I wish it would lighten a little, or at least not darken anymore.

It's amazing how the color is different from tree to tree. I always thought the wood species of the same would look the same.

Thank you all.

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
Roybrew is online now  
post #16 of 17 Old 07-12-2019, 12:00 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,516
View Quickstep's Photo Album My Photos
The Waterlox I use is called Waterlox Original. I think it has more resin than danish oil so it builds a finish faster.

The think I love about Waterlox is the ability to control the sheen. More coats = more sheen. I also find it really easy to apply.

I usually flood on the first coat and keep putting it on until it looks like it won’t absorb any more and then I wipe off all the excess and let it dry. Once that first coat is dry, if it looks uneven or has places that look like it got absorbed more than others, I repeat the process of flooding and wiping again.

After it’s dry, I sand lightly or steel wool just to remove any dust nibs. Then I brush on a coat with a (good) brush. I brush it thin as I can and let it dry. I repeat this until I get a sheen I like, them I’m done! For me this is usually two coats wiped and two - three coats brushed.

Things to be aware of with Waterlox:

It is dark; I think it pops grain better than anything, but it definitely has an amber tone.

The unused portion in the can will gel after a while. Waterlox is expensive, so having it go bad stinks. I avoid the gelling by adding marbles to the can until it raises the level to the rim to eliminate any extra air in the can.

Soaked rags can spontaneously combust. This is really true of just about any oil based finish, but it’s a real thing and something you should be aware of.
Quickstep is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Quickstep For This Useful Post:
Roybrew (07-13-2019)
post #17 of 17 Old 08-09-2019, 06:58 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Roybrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 237
View Roybrew's Photo Album My Photos
After a couple of test pieces, my wife and I decided on Formby's low gloss tung oil. I guess it's more of a wiping varnish, but after several coats, we are happy with the results. She done drug it up and put where she wanted to before I could get a better picture of it.
Roybrew is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Different Species of Walnut? Or different Finish? Levi Durston Wood Finishing 6 06-05-2018 01:17 PM
Walnut and maple breadboard jeremymcon Project Showcase 3 02-05-2018 09:17 PM
Built in Bookcase Questions wabbit General Woodworking Discussion 7 09-17-2017 07:19 PM
First project - restoring faded walnut cabinet rmo Wood Finishing 2 08-27-2017 04:22 PM
Curly Maple and Walnut cross - build thread difalkner Project Showcase 26 04-23-2017 04:25 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome