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post #1 of 13 Old 01-03-2019, 10:24 AM Thread Starter
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Wall mirror

Any suggestions for attaching the mirror to the back of this frame?

Rear will be rabbited.






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post #2 of 13 Old 01-03-2019, 10:37 AM
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put a 1/4 round on top of the glass.
if you can not find a store-bought one to fit,
make your own. rubber retainers are available online.
or small nails
or small metal wedges used for picture frames
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post #3 of 13 Old 01-03-2019, 10:41 AM
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GLAZER POINTS are typically used for this purpose.



If you really want to attach the mirror to the frame then use silicon.


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post #4 of 13 Old 01-03-2019, 11:19 AM
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In addition to glazer points, I have seen mirror and glass retaining clips made from plastic, metal, and rubber, or combinations of them. They come in many different shapes and configurations.

Do a web search for "mirror clips", "glass retainer clips", "glass panel clips", etc.

They typically screw into the wood, with a small protrusion to hold the glass or mirror in place. Some are nothing more than a stamped piece of thin metal with a screw hole.
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post #5 of 13 Old 01-03-2019, 11:32 AM
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I used 1/2" thick plywood to cover the back of a standing mirror. I rabbeted the perimeter of the plywood so that it pressed the mirror in place and then I drove brass screws to the 3/4" overlap on the frame. I painted the plywood before attaching. My mirrow leaned against the wall and I wanted a sealed surface to protect the mirror.

Glazier points will work too. Add a dust cover (craft paper glued to the back) to give a finished appearance.

This video shows how to apply a dust cover:

An additional tip is to spray the paper with water after applying it and then towel it dry. The paper will then shrink as it dries and will appear tight as a drum.
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post #6 of 13 Old 01-03-2019, 01:14 PM
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Packard, if youíre having to towel the paper you are spraying way too much water on it. Just enough water to dampen it will work. This is assuming youíre using brown craft paper.


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post #7 of 13 Old 01-03-2019, 02:22 PM
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It could be done like a picture frame. Put a piece of cardboard behind the glass and use glazing points or even staples. A spring loaded staple gun will staple it where half or more of the staple will stick out holding the mirror in. You could also make a piece of trim to nail to the rabbet. Another good way is to nail a strip of chair cane reed to the rabbet. This is especially helpful on a mirror which has a curved top such as that one. You could also lay the mirror in the rabbet and just go around it with some silicone caulk and just let it sit and dry.
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post #8 of 13 Old 01-03-2019, 05:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WesTex View Post
Packard, if youíre having to towel the paper you are spraying way too much water on it. Just enough water to dampen it will work. This is assuming youíre using brown craft paper.


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I always sprayed it with a spray bottle and wiped off any excess. It just dried faster that way. I used black craft paper--I thought it looked richer. I turned out several thousand in that way. Most framers did not bother. But I found early on that people look at the back of frames as a reflection of the quality of the work. Everyone has mounted some image in a frame. But rarely do they apply a dust cover. And never a fancy-ass label to boot.

I also made sure my hanging wire was tidy and I used crimped fasteners in place of the twisted versions.
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post #9 of 13 Old 01-03-2019, 11:47 PM
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I also used a spray bottle, but never used enough water to wipe off. I have not used the black paper. The dust cover is a fine place to add an info sheet.

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post #10 of 13 Old 01-04-2019, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone, lots of good information!


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post #11 of 13 Old 01-04-2019, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by WesTex View Post
I also used a spray bottle, but never used enough water to wipe off. I have not used the black paper. The dust cover is a fine place to add an info sheet.

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My framing shop was an outgrowth of my portrait photography studio. The framing became more profitable than the photography and it came to dominate the business.

When I framed a large enlargement I would attach a glassine envelope to the dust cover and slide in the negative. If I were doing this today I would attach a flash drive of the image to the back of the frame. Even the best color printing processes will have prints that shift in color over the years, so having the ability to re-print the original is a big plus. I suspect that the computer images will get lost over the years--just like all the negatives in my parents scrap book have become lost. So the flash drive is a good idea. A small bead chain could attach the flash drive to the hanging wire.

None of which is important to the mirror. For mirrors do not use screw eyes. Use mirror hangers. The are stronger and they allow the mirror to hang closer to the wall.

https://images.homedepot-static.com/...09-64_1000.jpg

They come in one, two, three and four screw versions. The two or three screw versions are fine for all but the heaviest mirrors.

The image shown in the OP makes me think that the store-bought version is made from MDF. In which case I would use the four screw types.

A lot of picture frames are made from very soft woods and screw eyes are problematic in those mouldings. I used the single screw hangers in place of screw eyes for all my frames.
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post #12 of 13 Old 01-04-2019, 11:36 AM
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The erosion of color prints is a problem. A high-end photographer I knew in the 80ís did four-color separations of his negs & froze them for future use.


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post #13 of 13 Old 01-04-2019, 12:13 PM
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The erosion of color prints is a problem. A high-end photographer I knew in the 80ís did four-color separations of his negs & froze them for future use.


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The original Gone With The Wind and Shane were shot on black and white film (three cameras) through 3 color filters and projected through 3 color filters.

Each projector had its own filter and the three projectors were aimed at the screen. If the filter faded it was replaced. But the color fidelity on the screen was always spectacular.

The two movies I cited above were shot in technicolor (GWW in 70mm) and if you ever have a chance to watch them in technicolor on the big screen it would be a huge treat.

But, alas, it was too expensive to shoot and the cameras were too big and bulky. The last movie shot in Technicolor was in 1955.
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