Wall Hanging Hand Tool Cabinet - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 21 Old 12-02-2008, 08:28 AM Thread Starter
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Wall Hanging Hand Tool Cabinet

Some time back I posted a SketchUp model of a wall hanging tool cabinet I intended to build in which I could house my precious hand tools. I am finished with everything except actually hanging all the tools, particularly in the doors. But I thought you might want a peek anyway. It is made from tiger maple and mahogany. I have one little problem; the left door is mounted with a sag and piano hinges don't allow for adjustments as cabinet doors do. If I can't find a simple solution I will have to re-hang it.

You can download the SketchUp model by going to http://www.srww.com/sketchup-furniture-plans.htm . You can read about its construction by going to http://www.srww.com/blog/?page_id=128 . The final Wall Hanging Hand Tool Cabinet - Update 5 will be posted on my blog tomorrow.

Believe it or not, I paid about $1 a bd ft for the material. I almost never pay more than $2 bd ft for any of my wood. I have cultivated local sources and even cut my own on occasion. See http://www.srww.com/blog/?p=28 for a better explanation.

The project requires approximately 70 bd ft depending on your estimate of waste.

I never keep track of my hours since this is a hobby and this project dragged on due to other family events and trips. Also, there is a lot of hand dovetailing, hand planing and hand sanding in this project, which takes quite a while. If I gave you an estimate of time it would be a pure guess. That said, maybe 60 hours. But that is 60 hours of pure joy! ;>)








Joe.....
Website: http://www.srww.com
Blog: http://www.srww.com/blog

Last edited by Chiefwoodworker; 12-02-2008 at 03:15 PM.
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post #2 of 21 Old 12-02-2008, 08:44 AM
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Beautiful work! That curly maple gets me all excited (as do all those nice planes). I see what you mean about the sag in the door. Probably time to re-hang it. You could drill out the screw holes and insert maple dowels. After planing and sanding them flat, you'd be able to start that hinge from scratch, and the dowels would not be visible since they'd be covered by the hinge.
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post #3 of 21 Old 12-02-2008, 09:18 AM Thread Starter
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thekctermite,

Thanks for the nice comments and recommendations. I will likely use that technique. Though first I have to come up with a new strategy for hanging the door. I thought my original strategy was quite good, but alas not so. I clamped a four foot level to the top with two feet of it hanging over the side. Then I clamped the door to the overhanging level. Next I drew the door tight to the cabinet side with clamps. Then I screwed the hinge in place. It worked great for the right door. But some how the left door is very slightly off. But given the height of the door (36") it produces significant sag. I checked both the cabinet and door for square and they are dead on.

If you have any ideas for alignment I would love to hear them. Thanks again.

Joe.....
Website: http://www.srww.com
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post #4 of 21 Old 12-02-2008, 10:08 AM
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Is it me or..does it just seem "plane" weird using antiquated tools to build projects drawn with google sketchup?
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post #5 of 21 Old 12-02-2008, 10:25 AM
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Hi Chiefwoodworker.

That is an absolutely gorgeous cabinet you have built. I have a suggestion for your sagging door, only if you do not wish to go to all the work of rehanging it. This would level the doors when they are closed, but not when opened. Cut a matching set of thin wedges and place them side by side where the doors come together. the left door would then ramp up to match the right one when closed. On your original hanging it sounds to me like you did everything right. It is possible that the left hinge has slightly more play around the pin than the right one, hence a slight sag. Take into consideration, that if you start adding tools to the doors, the condition will likely worsen. It will also slowly increase with use and wear.
Piano hinges are very strong, and a good choice for this type of cabinet, but as you found, they provide absolutely no means of adjustment.

I built a similar cabinet style many years ago, and it seems to me I had the same issuewith the doors.

Gerry
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post #6 of 21 Old 12-02-2008, 10:33 AM
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Hey CWW, WOW! That cabinet is gorgeous! Makes me sorta wish this was a hobby for me instead of a living...but 60 hours? Is that all?


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Originally Posted by mics_54 View Post
Is it me or..does it just seem "plane" weird using antiquated tools to build projects drawn with google sketchup?
The same could be said about getting on the web and posting digital photos of any of our projects. Or buying wood which was harvested across the continent. It is not "weird" to blend the archaic with the contemporary. It is the way of humanity.
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post #7 of 21 Old 12-02-2008, 10:59 AM Thread Starter
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Weird and wonderful!

Joe.....
Website: http://www.srww.com
Blog: http://www.srww.com/blog
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post #8 of 21 Old 12-02-2008, 11:04 AM Thread Starter
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Gerry,

My brother (also a woodworker) made the very same suggestion. I thought it rather crude. But maybe I should listen a little more. You are right that the problem will get worse over time. But I worry about the wood waring too quickly. Maybe I could put a metal "ramp" on the shelf and a metal plate on the door. Or do you think that overkill?

Joe.....
Website: http://www.srww.com
Blog: http://www.srww.com/blog
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post #9 of 21 Old 12-02-2008, 11:12 AM Thread Starter
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Mark,

Couldn't have said it better myself. By the way, beutiful work on your web site. It is fun to look at pictures of other woodworkers work, especially when it is so different from your own. Great stuff! I really like it.

By the way, 60 hours is a total guess. I can assure you I am a slow woodworker, though maybe an optimistic one.

Joe.....
Website: http://www.srww.com
Blog: http://www.srww.com/blog

Last edited by Chiefwoodworker; 12-02-2008 at 11:16 AM.
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post #10 of 21 Old 12-02-2008, 11:25 AM
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Quote:
Weird and wonderful!
I understand the sentiment.
...as for the non sequiturs...whatever.
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post #11 of 21 Old 12-03-2008, 09:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiefwoodworker View Post
Gerry,

My brother (also a woodworker) made the very same suggestion. I thought it rather crude. But maybe I should listen a little more. You are right that the problem will get worse over time. But I worry about the wood waring too quickly. Maybe I could put a metal "ramp" on the shelf and a metal plate on the door. Or do you think that overkill?
I agree, that it is a crude solution, but considering the very significant amount of time required to rehang the door, along the lines suggested, And the possibility that the problem might not go away, it might be the best option. A hard wood should last a long time, but you could use a wedge of one of the slippery plastics, and a striker plate instead. Metal might make a nasty noise, and you could end up with metal slivers or powder.

I don't know if reversing the hinge would help, but that is something you could look at also.

I know how distressing a small detail like a sagging hinge can be, but in reality the only time it is noticeable is when the doors are closed.
Correcting the problem when the doors are closed pretty much eliminates the problem, in my mind.

Gerry
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post #12 of 21 Old 12-03-2008, 10:46 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Gerry,

I think I will try the slippery plastic route.

Joe.....
Website: http://www.srww.com
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post #13 of 21 Old 12-03-2008, 04:31 PM
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BTW very nice cabinet. Did you build it all with hand tools? If so I am awed by your patience.

I wonder who came up with the idea to develope tools to build a cabinet to store the tools with which they built the cabinet?
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post #14 of 21 Old 12-03-2008, 04:50 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mics_54 View Post
BTW very nice cabinet. Did you build it all with hand tools? If so I am awed by your patience.

I wonder who came up with the idea to develope tools to build a cabinet to store the tools with which they built the cabinet?
Thanks mic_54.

No, I use power tools for things that make sense and would be too time consuming any other way e.g. thicknessing a board and ripping it or cuting it to length. I also sand most large boards or panels with a drum sander. But the joinery is mostly done by hand. All dovetails are done by hand - no exception.

On your last point, I don't know who came up with the tools, but I know it was a very, very, long time ago.

Joe.....
Website: http://www.srww.com
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post #15 of 21 Old 12-04-2008, 06:27 PM
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Joe,
Beautiful job on the cabinet. I love the maple. The nicest thing about this is that the cabinet was for your own shop. When we are building projects for others, it's a sad day sometimes when you have to hand it over. But in this case, you get to keep it. Perfect.
Mike Hawkins
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post #16 of 21 Old 12-05-2008, 08:06 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks firehawkmph. But I build furniture as a hobby. All of it goes to someone in my family, so I get to see it often and I believe it will get passed on from generation to generation. That's as good as keeping it. But occasionally I do like to hang unto things, espectially if it is useful in the shop. This baby is just what the doctor prescribed and I'm felling better already.

Joe.....
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post #17 of 21 Old 12-05-2008, 10:16 AM
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Quote:
But the joinery is mostly done by hand. All dovetails are done by hand - no exception.
Chief, I'm curious, why?
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post #18 of 21 Old 12-05-2008, 11:55 AM Thread Starter
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Hi mics_54,

It's just a choice I made a number of years back. I chose to use all hardwoods, no plywood and to do as much hand joinery as possible. Part of it is because I want to experience woodworking like it was experienced by craftsman like the Shakers. Part of it is that I think craft approaches art if it is executed by hand. And part of it is that my one experience with a dovetail jig left me unhappy.

Dovetail jigs take a very long time to set up and get adjusted right. They are not simple; I had to watch a video for a few hours before I could even come close.

Also, the joint that was made by the jig looked manufactured - exactly spaced dovetails each exactly the same size and all terribly proportioned. In addition, the rounded back side of the pin, in my opinion, has two problems. First there is less material than hand cut pins and second, expansion and contraction forces would operate on the curved pin over time to force it out of the joint. I can't prove the latter, but my theoretical analysis of it leaves me to believe this.

I am not judging others choice of using a dovetail jig. We all have to make our own choices. But I favor hand made joints.

Lastly, the shop is quieter and more pleasing to work in when hand crafting and it is rewarding to sit back and see what you created all by hand. In addition to being quieter, I donít have to brush wood chips from my hair and eyes after forming dovetails with the router.

This is just my reasoning, not a comment on doing things with power tools.

Joe.....
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post #19 of 21 Old 12-05-2008, 12:06 PM
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Chief: Fabulous work. If I may ask; Are you sure? you have a sag? If the doors are flush at the top and gaps are even, which in picture they seem to be then you may really have an out of square problem, Which is easier to fix, just scribe the bottom of that door to the cab base to get even gap and problem goes away way way easier.
Merry Christmas to all
Jack
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post #20 of 21 Old 12-05-2008, 12:20 PM
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Chief, thanks for the explaination. "no exception" just seemed to me an assertion with some explanation needed because of the imperative nature.
Also I would like to commend you on your website. I attempted to mention it previously but for some reason the edit didn't get posted.
I added it to my favorites and will be reading it often. I may contribute to the blogs but I rarely have much to say.
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