Very acute angles on large shapes, how? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 03:23 PM Thread Starter
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Very acute angles on large shapes, how?

Hi, first post here! So, I'm wanting to replicate a computer desk I found. http://community.coolermaster.com/to...a-desk/?page=2 . My question is how does he make such steep angles and how does he do it so accurately? The work pieces definitely won't fit upright on a table or miter saw and I don't know of any jigsaws capable of over 50 degree cuts. How can I pull that off without losing my sanity? The specific parts I'm referring to is the control panel on the front (the top cut) and the two very angular side covers (the angle/cut at the front bottom)
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post #2 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 04:22 PM
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I do not see any external angles on there that could not be cut with a table saw. Or a circular saw using a guide. Or a jig saw using a guide. The jig saw would not make as accurate/smooth a cut but it could be done.

Maybe I do not understand your problem Please circle on the picture the cuts you are concerned about.

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post #3 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 05:57 PM
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Agreed, I'm not seeing any cuts that couldn't be done on a table saw.

A better question would be how the devil does he glue them

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post #4 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 06:01 PM
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Long acute angles can be cut safely on a table saw using a Taper Jig or Guide. Easy to make one or cheap to buy in the various woodworking catalogs. I'm thinking biscuit joinery for a lot of that project.

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post #5 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 09:29 PM
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You can cut 50 degrees on a table saw by setting the saw on 40 degrees and running the board vertical against the fence. You would need a zero clearance coverplate on the saw to do this.
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post #6 of 25 Old 03-07-2017, 11:02 PM
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If you read through that whole thread, you can tell just how he made all the cuts and pieces. Maybe not the actual tools used, but the cuts are all presented in rough form and after finishing. Doesn't look too difficult, just time consuming.
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post #7 of 25 Old 03-08-2017, 08:30 PM Thread Starter
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Specifically I am talking about the angles that the side "Covers" make to the table itself. Circled in red. Like a bevel but rather steep like 70-75 degrees.


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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
You can cut 50 degrees on a table saw by setting the saw on 40 degrees and running the board vertical against the fence. You would need a zero clearance coverplate on the saw to do this.
This sounds like a good plan but what about boards that are really tall and heavy? (not really applicable with this project) And it's a shame but a table saw is one of the few power tools I do not currently own. Can you recommend one that can accomplish this that doesn't break the bank terribly? I just recently obtained an interest to get into woodworking so I am starting to pick up new tools. I have used and owned table saws in the past but never for anything more than easy standard cuts.
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post #8 of 25 Old 03-08-2017, 09:19 PM
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Without being there it's difficult to say what saw might work. At a 90 degree angle most saws you can only raise the blade up 3". If you had the blade turned at 15 to 20 degrees it's less than 3" to cut a 70 to 75 degree angle and it may not cut through. Another option might be to make a router sled which would machine off the end of the board held at a 70 degree angle.

Table saws are more expensive than a lot of tools because most of us regard it as the most important machine in the shop. Most tend to last a lifetime or more so you might save money by buying a used saw. You can surely get more saw for the buck by buying used.
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post #9 of 25 Old 03-08-2017, 10:53 PM
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Again ... the build starts on page 1.
About three quarters of the way down that page of posts, is a long one detailing those pieces. He didn't cut them out of one piece of wood!
They are made from 3/4" or 1" pressed wood and glued into that shape. They're hollow.
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post #10 of 25 Old 03-08-2017, 10:57 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Without being there it's difficult to say what saw might work. At a 90 degree angle most saws you can only raise the blade up 3". If you had the blade turned at 15 to 20 degrees it's less than 3" to cut a 70 to 75 degree angle and it may not cut through. Another option might be to make a router sled which would machine off the end of the board held at a 70 degree angle.

Table saws are more expensive than a lot of tools because most of us regard it as the most important machine in the shop. Most tend to last a lifetime or more so you might save money by buying a used saw. You can surely get more saw for the buck by buying used.
But for this particular job where the material is only going to be a 1/4" or 1/2" thick MDF, what table saw is of good quality and has the zero clearance plate to make that cut? One that will help me preserve my sanity during this endeavor. I could probably spare up to $700 or $800.
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post #11 of 25 Old 03-08-2017, 11:33 PM
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I looked at Worcester and Boston Craigslist and didn't see anything good for less than twelve to thirteen hundred dollars. There was a powermatic saw for around five hundred but it needed a lot of work and a new motor.

The zero clearance insert is something you can make yourself out of wood.
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post #12 of 25 Old 03-09-2017, 01:06 AM Thread Starter
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Can you show me a picture of what you are talking about with the insert? Also, can you show me the ones you found for $1300-1400?
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post #13 of 25 Old 03-09-2017, 01:08 AM Thread Starter
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I don't know saws very well, but this one is huge and seems like it has decent angle adjustments, https://worcester.craigslist.org/tls/6035359177.html



OOOOH, a radial arm saw. This things looks like it can damn near cut a 89.9 degree angle. Whatchya think?
https://worcester.craigslist.org/tls/6015067736.html

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post #14 of 25 Old 03-09-2017, 04:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laser411 View Post
But for this particular job where the material is only going to be a 1/4" or 1/2" thick MDF, what table saw is of good quality and has the zero clearance plate to make that cut? One that will help me preserve my sanity during this endeavor. I could probably spare up to $700 or $800.
Thats a pretty good budget for a new saw to set up your workspace. If you dont mind me derailing your thread for jut a second, i recommend something like the Delta 36-725:
https://www.lowes.com/pd/DELTA-13-Am...e-Saw/50081568

Ive had one for a few years now, and i honestly think its one of the best saws a hobbiest could own.Its got a 1.5hp motor, so with proper blade selection itll scream right on through the plywood, 3/4 solid wood and composites you can throw at it, the fence is absolutely excellent, theres plenty of space on the table for good support, the built in mobile base makes it easy to move around. Really, the only downside ive found is the dust collection could be slightly better

As far as the zero clearance insert goes, i wouldnt even factor that into your shopping list. The inserts are dead easy to make yourself for nearly any saw

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post #15 of 25 Old 03-09-2017, 07:52 AM Thread Starter
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I still have not figured out what those inserts are exactly. Anyways, yeah, that saw looks pretty capable, but my question is why not use a radial arm saw instead? It has ripping capabilities, miter capability, bevel capability, even has a built in router (not very good for it though) and it's 2.5-3HP. Although ripping isn't the easiest thing to do on the radial arm saw as it is weird to do it sideways, it is still very capable at making almost any cut you want it seems. Is there any reason I shouldn't just get that?
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post #16 of 25 Old 03-09-2017, 08:29 AM
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If you could raise the money for a Powermatic or Delta Unisaw that should last for you.
https://worcester.craigslist.org/tls/5974829894.html

https://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/tls/6032910170.html

https://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/tls/6032909801.html

https://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/tls/6025272120.html

Apparently the place in Boston has three saws for sale but only took one picture of one saw.
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post #17 of 25 Old 03-09-2017, 09:07 AM
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Table saw insert ...
https://woodgears.ca/table_saw/throat_insert.html
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post #18 of 25 Old 03-09-2017, 12:37 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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odd shaped pieces....safety issues

The thing about using a circular saw, either on a table saw or radial arm saw is securing the workpiece at the proper angle and holding it in that position all during the cut. Any variation .... and the piece or the saw carriage will kick back destroying everything in it's path.... fingers?

When the workpiece has all sorts of weird angles you can't hold on to it. You could mount it to a base and control it better that way? I don't know of an easy/safe solution to your question. Back in school we made shapes like that using a Stanley knife on a cutting board, cutting stryrofoam sheets, not wood. It will be more difficult to cut thicker material that way however.

:frown2:

This is the only tool I know of that will hold the piece at "odd" angles and cut them safely. It has enough "reach" to make longer cuts than a RAS:


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 03-09-2017 at 12:54 PM.
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post #19 of 25 Old 03-09-2017, 01:16 PM
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Cheapest, easiest solution for this project: build a router sled. Make a jig to hold the work at the correct angle, a few passes of the router will produce what you need.
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post #20 of 25 Old 03-09-2017, 02:28 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
The thing about using a circular saw, either on a table saw or radial arm saw is securing the workpiece at the proper angle and holding it in that position all during the cut. Any variation .... and the piece or the saw carriage will kick back destroying everything in it's path.... fingers?

When the workpiece has all sorts of weird angles you can't hold on to it. You could mount it to a base and control it better that way? I don't know of an easy/safe solution to your question. Back in school we made shapes like that using a Stanley knife on a cutting board, cutting stryrofoam sheets, not wood. It will be more difficult to cut thicker material that way however.

:frown2:

This is the only tool I know of that will hold the piece at "odd" angles and cut them safely. It has enough "reach" to make longer cuts than a RAS:

Introducing The EZ-One Woodworking Center - YouTube
So that's great for taper cuts and stuff but will that do a 70 degree beveled edge? it looks like it only has like 50 degrees of movement along that axis, unless I am missing something.


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Originally Posted by Larry Schweitzer View Post
Cheapest, easiest solution for this project: build a router sled. Make a jig to hold the work at the correct angle, a few passes of the router will produce what you need.
How would one make a router sled and jig that would allow a router to accomplish that? I can't seem to imagine what it would look like. Can you find an example by chance?


I am almost to the part in sketchup where I will be designing that section, so when I am done I will upload that and pictures along with an exact angle of that cut.

By the way, thank you everyone for taking the time out to reply. Being pretty new to woodworking a lot of these concepts are new to me so I am learning quite a bit. I didn't even know some of these tools existed till these past few days.

Last edited by Laser411; 03-09-2017 at 02:32 PM.
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