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-   -   Verticle bevel cuts on cedar trim (https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/verticle-bevel-cuts-cedar-trim-99049/)

GHP 07-02-2015 10:07 PM

Verticle bevel cuts on cedar trim
 
Hello, I am new to carpentry so I thought I could find some help here.

I am replacing rough cut cedar trim, 1x10x16. I need to bevel cut one of the edges.

I am looking for an advice on how to cut such long 16ft piece of cedar on a table saw with an angle.

Do you set up your saw on the ground instead of the table?


I attach a picture to give you an idea of what kind of an angle I am trying to achieve.

Also what angle would you guess that is? 15 degrees? 30?

Thank you for all your help in advance

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/538/45gpF2.jpg

asevereid 07-02-2015 10:17 PM

I had a similar issue not too long ago with some interior trim elements, and I ended up using my track saw... Mitered at 13 to get the miter to close nicely.
My rips were only 7' though.
If your going to do it on a table saw, just be sure to have a helper or some good infeed and outfeed support.
http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/07...16063d5083.jpg
http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/07...72fc3c2f85.jpg

BernieL 07-02-2015 10:21 PM

Too figure the exact angle, take another board and place it on the sill to the left. Make sure it is longer then the whole side. Have someone hold it tight against the building - take another shorter board and lay it across the left side of front windows making sure it overlaps the 1st board. Draw a line where the 2 boards overlap and now you can measure the exact angle.

fire65 07-02-2015 10:21 PM

Welcome to the forum. I do not guess at anything.

GHP 07-02-2015 10:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by asevereid (Post 1017153)
I had a similar issue not too long ago with some interior trim elements, and I ended up using my track saw... Mitered at 13 to get the miter to close nicely.
My rips were only 7' though.
If your going to do it on a table saw, just be sure to have a helper or some good infeed and outfeed support.
http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/07...16063d5083.jpg
http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/07...72fc3c2f85.jpg

What other options are there besides table saw, for such a cut?

I feel like even with the helper, it will be extremely difficult to cut such a long piece.

woodnthings 07-02-2015 10:34 PM

no problem
 
You can just use a circular saw with an edge guide and follow the straight edge of the board at the proper distance for the bevel. Make test cuts to get the bevels and widths correct.

http://cdn.protoolreviews.com/wp-con...s/ptr/1635.jpg

asevereid 07-02-2015 10:45 PM

^This. [emoji115]
Or a track saw[emoji28]

Toolman50 07-02-2015 10:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by woodnthings (Post 1017217)
You can just use a circular saw with an edge guide and follow the straight edge of the board at the proper distance for the bevel. Make test cuts to get the bevels and widths correct.
http://cdn.protoolreviews.com/wp-con...s/ptr/1635.jpg

+1: the portable circular saw is what I see used most on the job-sites.
But, usually without the edge guide. Guys just draw a straight line or clamp one board over another to act as straight edge.

jdonhowe 07-03-2015 01:43 PM

From the picture, it looks like the angle is 45 degrees, but as others have noted, make sure first. Set a combination square against the joint to check for 45.

For the cut angle, you need to see whether one board overlaps the other at the joint, or whether they meet in a miter joint. For an overlap, the cut angle is the total angle (say 45 degrees). If it's a miter, it needs to be one half that angle- 22.5 degrees.

Agree with Toolman50 that using a clamped board as an edge guide would probably give a better cut- a poor man's track saw, and less likely for the saw to pivot, as might happen on the saw mounted guide. Also, remember that the angle gauge on most circular saws is more of a suggestion than a rule, so make test cuts and adjust accordingly. Good luck!

GHP 07-04-2015 08:44 AM

Thank you everyone for your comments and help!!

I had a helper, so I decided to make those cuts on a table saw, they came out pretty good, It was 30 degree angle.

I am new to carpentry I am learning as I go, here's some shots of the work.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/673/2ZBbY0.jpg

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/537/nz7ZZ6.jpg

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/540/AaQlf0.jpg

woodnthings 07-04-2015 09:12 AM

looks great!
 
This may sound confusing but here goes...
It looked like the angle was 120 degrees to me, certainly not 45 degrees.
So, the pieces must be cut at a 60 degrees to mate together. To get a 60 degree angle on the table saw, you set the blade at 30 degrees..... Huh?

In the world of woodworking, 90 degrees is zero. Miter saws are a good example where the blade is 90 degrees to the back fence and moving the arm to the left or right starts out from 0 then 5, then 10 and so forth, upwards to 45 degrees. The table saw blade is 90 degrees to the table a zero and tilting the blade, usually to the left, it starts out at 5 degrees, then 10 degrees and so forth over to 45 degrees.

The resultant angle, is always 90 degrees minus the "setting" on the saw. In your case the 30 degree setting, ( 90 - 30 = 60) will yield a 60 degree ang le or bevel on the edge. Mate the 2 boards together and you get a 120 degree included angle.

:smile:

Ghidrah 07-04-2015 05:28 PM

1 Attachment(s)
If you're using a portable TS, a tech I've been using for decades at jobsites is to set 3 2X4s on horses, cantilever 2 2X4s past the horse enough to slide the table of the TS over them then place a sht of ply over the horses. If you don't have help you can set a couple rollers up fore and aft the table and TS to stabilize the length of the board.

For the long trim boards you'll need the straightest ones you can find at the lumber yd., on an existing structure odds are high the house has settled and moved, the winds may not be as lined up as they once were, the old trim made some subtle moves with it.

As for the trim angle take 2 pieces of 1X the same width a foot long place them on edge across the trim. Mark the inside and outside points where the 2 pieces cross, connect the marks with a line and you have the angle.

I would not butt the miters; I'd lap them for glue, nailing and or screws, I would expect overlap when assembled on the wall so prepare for some RAS or hand planing use to smooth the exterior lines.

I'd also consider holding the trim a 1/4" off the brick sill, I'd place ice/water barrier on the wall then flash it with a lead pan for runoff.


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