Using tablesaw as jointer - First timer - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 16 Old 10-19-2015, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Using tablesaw as jointer - First timer

I've read threads and seen videos of varying tablesaw jigs to square up one side of a board. I created a jig with some 3/4" plywood and some a couple clamps, but have had trouble truing up a bowed 5' board.

I don't want to keep shaving this board down in trial and error. Any tips to working with bowed boards in this manner? Do I need more clamps? Should I be placing it curved edges up or down? Any help appreciated.

Thanks!
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post #2 of 16 Old 10-19-2015, 05:58 PM
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You just need a good sled called a straight line rip jig. What are you using now?
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post #3 of 16 Old 10-19-2015, 06:00 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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curved edges go to the left side of the blade

I don't know how you think the curved edges can go up or down. The point is to lay the board flat on the jig, clamp it down and saw off the curved edge.

The jig/sled will only correct the edges, not the faces.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-19-2015 at 06:21 PM.
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post #4 of 16 Old 10-19-2015, 06:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
I don't know how you think the curved edges can go up or down. The point of the is is to lay the board flat on the jig and saw off the curved edge.

The jig/sled will only correct the edges, not the faces.
When I read that I assumed he was trying to flatten the board, so I decided not to reply...
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post #5 of 16 Old 10-19-2015, 08:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoot summ View Post
When I read that I assumed he was trying to flatten the board, so I decided not to reply...


x2.
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post #6 of 16 Old 10-19-2015, 09:25 PM
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Me and Woodnthings have similar ripping sleds. Their purpose is to use the table saw to rip a straight edge on a bowed board.

Sometimes I do this when I buy 10-12 foot 4/4 rough lumber. I cut the pieces in to workable stock of 4 feet or thereabouts. Then I clamp it onto my sled, adjust it against the fence and run it through. The end result is a straight edge.
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post #7 of 16 Old 10-19-2015, 09:48 PM
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To the OP, I hope you understand in all of this that you can edge joint a board on a table saw but never face joint.
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post #8 of 16 Old 10-20-2015, 11:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Allman27 View Post
To the OP, I hope you understand in all of this that you can edge joint a board on a table saw but never face joint.
Yes you can face joint. Like the OP said there are jigs that allow you to do this. I have seen a couple videos where this was done. Takes a lot of time and effort so its easier to use a jointer but some people don't have the money or space for one.

Here is the video I was referring to.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ryaL6buKmyo

Don't be so narrow minded :P
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post #9 of 16 Old 10-20-2015, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by arvanlaar View Post
Yes you can face joint. Like the OP said there are jigs that allow you to do this. I have seen a couple videos where this was done. Takes a lot of time and effort so its easier to use a jointer but some people don't have the money or space for one.

Here is the video I was referring to.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ryaL6buKmyo

Don't be so narrow minded :P
I viewed that video and one of the first things he said, is that a Jointer is the way to do this task. Now if your really into making all sorts of jigs, enjoy yourself and be careful that looks dangerous on the table saw.

When I couldn't afford a Power Jointer and Planer, I would square up a board the way I first started - use hand planes and a marking gauge and winding sticks.

I like to make furniture not jigs ;-)

Jack
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post #10 of 16 Old 10-20-2015, 12:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacko9 View Post
I viewed that video and one of the first things he said, is that a Jointer is the way to do this task. Now if your really into making all sorts of jigs, enjoy yourself and be careful that looks dangerous on the table saw.

When I couldn't afford a Power Jointer and Planer, I would square up a board the way I first started - use hand planes and a marking gauge and winding sticks.

I like to make furniture not jigs ;-)

Jack
Haha I hear you! I mean, if you have a good hand plane and can use that for sure! There are definitely better ways than this jig no question about that at all. The gentleman I was referring to was very confident that it couldn't be done and I wanted to let him know if definitely can be.

Everyone has tools and methods that suit them best. Gotta make due with what we have the means to own right? :)
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post #11 of 16 Old 10-20-2015, 12:39 PM
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Yes, it's the same principle

A board straightening jig clamps the board flat to a support piece and you trim off the curved edges using the table saw's fence to register the jig.

A face flattening jig would also hold the board, only vertically. The limitations are the total or maximum height of the blade and trying to locate the second cut so it intersects exactly with the first cut..... not my idea of convenient or accurate since the board would have to be secured on it's narrow edge.

A hand plane and some winding sticks would be faster and more convenient in my opinion.

A sled for the thickness plane would also be a good choice. I made one from some threaded rod and 2 rabbeted wood rails:

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/membe...kmatch-clamps/

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-20-2015 at 01:30 PM.
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post #12 of 16 Old 10-20-2015, 01:49 PM
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I agree that we need to use the tools we can afford to do the job. Even though I now have a 8" wide long bed jointer (and planer), I still use my jointer plane when jointing boards over 8" wide. If I have a short length I do it all by hand if it's longer than 5' or so, I take the guard off my jointer, cut the 8" width and finish the extra width with my hand jointer plane using the machined surface for reference. I think every woodworker making solid wood projects should learn to use a hand plane every now and then.

Jack
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post #13 of 16 Old 10-21-2015, 08:59 AM Thread Starter
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Sorry for the confusion, i meant edge join.

I originally made a jig much like MT_Stringer. The clamps I had were a little underwhelming in size and weren't holding down the bow very well so I made up another jig that I saw that used wedges.

This one seems to be working better, except for the last 6 inches or so of my workpiece would be a little out of whack. I'm going to doublecheck that it isn't my reference piece on the jig. if the jig looks fine im going to need another way to get myself a glue ready edge. is handplaning tough for a beginner to get right? i really don't want to have to spring for a jointer.
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post #14 of 16 Old 10-21-2015, 04:17 PM
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Hand planning is not rocket science, but it's a learned skill that takes time to master. Fortunately, it's also one of the most gratifying woodworking endeavors (rather sensual, actually), and once you get it down to where you're not intimidated by the tool you'll find it's an incredibly useful skill to have.

Dave in CT, USA
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post #15 of 16 Old 10-21-2015, 04:45 PM
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you have a "warped" board

Quote:
Originally Posted by flamingoezz View Post
Sorry for the confusion, i meant edge join.

This one seems to be working better, except for the last 6 inches or so of my workpiece would be a little out of whack. I'm going to doublecheck that it isn't my reference piece on the jig. if the jig looks fine im going to need another way to get myself a glue ready edge. is handplaning tough for a beginner to get right? i really don't want to have to spring for a jointer.



Warped could mean curved or bowed, or twisted. If the board is NOT twisted you are most of the way there. If the edges need straightening then a jig, or a really long fence or a straight board attached to one edge will work.

If the board is bowed or has a curve when looked at from the edge straight on, that a bigger issue. You need a jointer or need to plane the ends away until it's flat.

If the board is twisted that's even worse. Sometimes, actually most times, it's best to just toss it and find a better ... straighter, flatter piece of wood. Twist can be jointed out but requires some experience on the jointer. It can also be hand planed out, but also require more experience.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-21-2015 at 07:40 PM.
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post #16 of 16 Old 10-21-2015, 04:51 PM
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Using a straight line rip jig isn't hard. Trying to use the table saw to square the face of the board looks like a good way to loose your membership to the 10 finger club. Even if it was perfectly safe it is slow and extremely limited.
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