using Router Table to cut cutting board channel - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 Old 10-29-2013, 05:05 PM Thread Starter
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using Router Table to cut cutting board channel

I cut a channel in a cutting board using my router table. In the first picture I used a 1" thick board to set the fence back 1"from the bit. In picture 2 and 3 I put marks on the fence 1" on each side of the bit. in the next pictures you will see how I use these marks to know where to start and stop the cuts. It worked well. I still experience a problem with burning in the corners as you stop moving the board to pick it up. I did the cut in 3 passes with the last one being very light.
Tom
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post #2 of 11 Old 10-29-2013, 05:09 PM Thread Starter
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Pictures showing using marks for start and stop position and of board with the cut channel.
Tom
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post #3 of 11 Old 10-29-2013, 08:09 PM
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that is the way I do it. Good job.

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post #4 of 11 Old 10-29-2013, 08:15 PM
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That's a good technique. I also use it for hinge rebates on small boxes.

John

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post #5 of 11 Old 10-30-2013, 12:10 AM
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Instead of going by marks on your fence, have a long enough fence so you can clamp stop blocks to it. When you drop the work on a spinning bit, there is always the possibility that the work will get grabbed and pulled out of your hands. A stop block will prevent this. They also give you a positive place to start and end the cuts that will be consistent. Being against a block in starting and finishing the cut gives more control in dropping on and lifting up. You aren't sneaking up like you have to with marks. You can keep a more fluid motion going which will help with burning. Anytime you stop, you will burn, so the idea is to keep motion going. With blocks you can start moving as soon as you drop on and lift off without stopping. I've seen too many hands cut up because of trying to align with marks or I wouldn't have said anything. A hand held plunge router with a template guide and a template attached to the cutting board is another good method since the motion can be continuous. You can do shaped grooves with templates, too.
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post #6 of 11 Old 10-30-2013, 07:57 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Hammer1 View Post
Instead of going by marks on your fence, have a long enough fence so you can clamp stop blocks to it. When you drop the work on a spinning bit, there is always the possibility that the work will get grabbed and pulled out of your hands. A stop block will prevent this. They also give you a positive place to start and end the cuts that will be consistent. Being against a block in starting and finishing the cut gives more control in dropping on and lifting up. You aren't sneaking up like you have to with marks. You can keep a more fluid motion going which will help with burning. Anytime you stop, you will burn, so the idea is to keep motion going. With blocks you can start moving as soon as you drop on and lift off without stopping. I've seen too many hands cut up because of trying to align with marks or I wouldn't have said anything. A hand held plunge router with a template guide and a template attached to the cutting board is another good method since the motion can be continuous. You can do shaped grooves with templates, too.
You are correct that stop blocks would be better. However you would need to set up a total of four start and stop blocks( two at a time). Using the marks I only had to use the two for the start and stop points on all four sides of the board.

Tom
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post #7 of 11 Old 10-30-2013, 08:36 AM
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Start and stop lines will work, but take a concentrated effort to be accurate. I use that method when routing mortises. Besides the burning problem with stop blocks there is also the "bumping" problem. Working upside down doesn't allow a visual of what's going on. I've had debris get jammed doing procedures that way.

It's the same complaint I have in using a stack dado on the table saw. Besides having to hold tight to the fence, parts have to be forced down. Not that easy to do with large pieces and sheet goods. I prefer using a router handheld, for most all dadoes.






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post #8 of 11 Old 10-30-2013, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by TomC View Post
You are correct that stop blocks would be better. However you would need to set up a total of four start and stop blocks( two at a time). Using the marks I only had to use the two for the start and stop points on all four sides of the board.

Tom
If you have multiple stops, you can use hinged stop blocks and flip them out of the way. When you have to look for a mark it takes your concentration away from other issues. You can easily go too far or not far enough, (inconsistency) with marks. The worst issue is when dropping down at the start of the cut, this is when the work can kickback.
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post #9 of 11 Old 10-30-2013, 12:47 PM
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thanks for posting this. I've done drop down cuts on my router table before and they've worked pretty well. definitely going to try this.
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post #10 of 11 Old 10-30-2013, 03:42 PM
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I don't understand how you stop. Do you just stop and pick the piece up or shut the router off?
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post #11 of 11 Old 10-30-2013, 04:56 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Noek View Post
I don't understand how you stop. Do you just stop and pick the piece up or shut the router off?
Yes, you just stop and pick the board up. Now turn it 90 degrees, set the end away form the bit on the table, line the other end up with the start mark, lower the board on to the bit and push the board until the end of the board is at the stop mark. Repeat until all four sides are done. Raise bit height and repeat as necessary.
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