Uses for hemlock? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 11 Old 06-11-2012, 07:57 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Central PA
Posts: 789
View beelzerob's Photo Album My Photos
Uses for hemlock?

I'm targeting an auction coming up that lists hemlock and cherry. I'm definitely interested in the cherry, but he said there's probably more hemlock than cherry. The pics of it make it look like stacks of lumber like @ Lowes....so we're talking lots of wood.

Doing a quick search here and with Mr. google didn't reveal a lot of preference for using hemlock for much....so I'm curious what its typical usage is. Furniture? Outdoor furniture? Flooring?

Thanks for any help.
beelzerob is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 Old 06-11-2012, 08:05 PM
Trytore Member
 
Shop Dad's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Central New Jersey
Posts: 2,764
View Shop Dad's Photo Album My Photos
I believe Socrates found (first hand) that hemlock could kill a man. Maybe he just met a large board abruptly?
Shop Dad is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Shop Dad For This Useful Post:
STAR (06-12-2012)
post #3 of 11 Old 06-11-2012, 08:24 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Central PA
Posts: 789
View beelzerob's Photo Album My Photos
Heh...ya, up until now, that was also my only association with hemlock. I've already decided not to eat any of the planks. Well, at least, not TOO many....
beelzerob is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 11 Old 06-11-2012, 08:44 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,872
View trc65's Photo Album My Photos
Not to continue this thread too off topic, but like Shop Dad said, the only way that anything from a hemlock tree would have killed Socrates was if someone hit him with a board or a tree fell on him. The tree is not poisonous. Poison hemlock is a herbaceous biennial plant in which all portions of the plant are poisonous.

Here is a short article from Wood Magazine talking about the characteristics of hemlock and its' uses.
http://www.woodmagazine.com/material...ies-2/hemlock/

"Good Behavior is the last refuge of mediocrity" -- Henry S. Haskins
trc65 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to trc65 For This Useful Post:
beelzerob (06-11-2012)
post #5 of 11 Old 06-11-2012, 09:18 PM
Senior Member
 
Alchymist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Central PA
Posts: 2,221
View Alchymist's Photo Album My Photos
One thing I can tell you about hemlock - borer bees won't bore holes in it!
Alchymist is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to Alchymist For This Useful Post:
beelzerob (06-11-2012)
post #6 of 11 Old 06-11-2012, 10:46 PM
Extreme Birdhouse Builder
 
cranbrook2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 429
View cranbrook2's Photo Album My Photos
I use old hemlock all the time .It holds up very well outdoors .
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	315326_10150821944970637_867305636_20873410_1206696230_n.jpg
Views:	1232
Size:	99.2 KB
ID:	45962  

Click image for larger version

Name:	309866_10150841725080637_867305636_21005783_1501548890_n.jpg
Views:	1254
Size:	102.0 KB
ID:	45963  

Click image for larger version

Name:	ideas.jpg
Views:	1537
Size:	103.2 KB
ID:	45964  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_6565-1.jpg
Views:	1230
Size:	101.3 KB
ID:	45965  

cranbrook2 is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to cranbrook2 For This Useful Post:
beelzerob (06-12-2012), STAR (06-12-2012)
post #7 of 11 Old 06-13-2012, 12:16 PM
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 43
View Martyanderson's Photo Album My Photos
Hemlock is a great wood for outdoor use, as mentioned pests won't get in it and it is very rot resistant. Some say it holds up better than treated wood. I put hemlock siding on my house and I built a deck frame with. It is plentifull around my part of TN. It is very splintery and would not be good for furniture and fine wood projects.
Martyanderson is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Martyanderson For This Useful Post:
beelzerob (06-13-2012)
post #8 of 11 Old 06-13-2012, 12:27 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Central PA
Posts: 789
View beelzerob's Photo Album My Photos
Soo, outdoor use, but not furniture. That leaves out deck chairs or benches. Seems birdhouses are a safe bet. We're going to undergo a major deck upgrade next year, maybe I can find a use for it there.

Either way, it seems I definitely won't turn my nose up at hemlock if I can acquire some at a decent price at the auction. I made that mistake at one auction (missed out on a ton of pine), and won't make that again.
beelzerob is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 06-13-2012, 02:32 PM
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 43
View Martyanderson's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by beelzerob View Post
Soo, outdoor use, but not furniture. That leaves out deck chairs or benches. Seems birdhouses are a safe bet. We're going to undergo a major deck upgrade next year, maybe I can find a use for it there.

Either way, it seems I definitely won't turn my nose up at hemlock if I can acquire some at a decent price at the auction. I made that mistake at one auction (missed out on a ton of pine), and won't make that again.
You could probably use it for deck furniture if you plane and sand it real good.
Martyanderson is offline  
post #10 of 11 Old 06-13-2012, 02:35 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Central PA
Posts: 789
View beelzerob's Photo Album My Photos
So, the "splintery" is more during the actual working than just naturally as it ages, I guess.

What came to my mind was the pressure treated decking my cousin has that has caused numerous splinters in my kids feet as they run around on it. But I guess running on it is a bit more forceful usage than you'd get just sitting in a normal deck chair.
beelzerob is offline  
post #11 of 11 Old 06-13-2012, 09:29 PM
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 43
View Martyanderson's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by beelzerob View Post
So, the "splintery" is more during the actual working than just naturally as it ages, I guess.

What came to my mind was the pressure treated decking my cousin has that has caused numerous splinters in my kids feet as they run around on it. But I guess running on it is a bit more forceful usage than you'd get just sitting in a normal deck chair.
Yeah I think you could plane/sand it to be pretty smooth but I don't know because I have never tried. I have worked with 1,000s of ft of it but never tried to smooth it out. I would never use it for deck boards because of the splintering and extensive sanding it would take to make it work. I did use it for a deck frame, railing, ballisters, rail cap in rough sawn condition.
I would buy it if the price is right as it is pretty sought after in my part of the country and would have a lot of uses outdoors. Plane a piece down and sand it and see how it looks, I think it would be good for a deck chair.
Martyanderson is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fir, hemlock tree Rayal Oak General Woodworking Discussion 9 03-10-2012 07:10 PM
Turning hemlock BigJoe16 Woodturning 8 02-25-2012 04:02 PM
What about hemlock? haugerm General Woodworking Discussion 6 05-11-2011 04:39 PM
fir? hemlock? something else? phinds General Woodworking Discussion 11 02-22-2011 12:46 AM
Hemlock and Mahogany Kornphlake General Woodworking Discussion 0 12-31-2007 03:12 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome