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post #61 of 74 Old 12-21-2013, 09:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NetDoc
I don't understand the reasoning behind this tilt issue? Why would the direction of tilt matter to which side you fence is on? I'm not trying to argue: just understand.
For one you are trapping the wood under the blade and against the fence. Difficult to push it through and will shoot back if not. The blade is cutting into the fence with many cuts as it needs to be extended higher than the cut is wide. Try it next time your in your shop.

Right tilt is the only reason the Unisaw isn't the best saw ever made. Now they tilt left but no longer come with the Unifence so no point for me to buy one.

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post #62 of 74 Old 12-21-2013, 09:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NetDoc
Interesting. I usually am using a miter when I am doing angled cuts.
We are talking about rip cuts.

Al

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post #63 of 74 Old 12-21-2013, 09:52 PM
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miters vs bevels

generally speaking....
A picture frame is mitered. A cabinet has beveled corner joints.
So, a miter is an angled cut across the flat surface. A bevel is like a rip cut with the blade tilted along the length of the workpeice.

Miter cut:


bevel cut on the table saw:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #64 of 74 Old 12-22-2013, 01:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cambriahouse View Post
I received the T2 fence on Friday. It's certainly a massive and heavy fence, it makes the original Craftsman fence seem like a toy.

My saw has the splitter/blade guard mount that extends out the back just under the table surface. I can either cut it off (round rod) flush with the edge of the table or I can notch the rear T2 rail. The rail would need to be notched about 3/8", which would remove the horizontal part of the rail since its only 1/4" thick.

I don't usually use the splitter/guard, but cutting off the rod would mean it could never be used.

Has anyone dealt with this issue on their Craftsman? I don't know if this is type of splitter is common on the Craftsman. An online search shows a few cases mentioned and the solution was to cut the rod off.

If you did cut off the splitter/guard, what did you use instead?

Steve

When I got my saw (it was a used Craig's list find for $75.00) it did not have the splitter/guard, however it did have the rod sticking out of the back. I cut the rod off of mine as the guard parts are not available anymore. Be careful because the mounting bolts for that rod are also the arbor alignment bolts. I wasn't careful and had to realign my blade after I cut the rod.

I also did not get the original table insert with mine, so I have had to make inserts and I also added splitters. If you don't want to make your own splitters, but plan on making ZCI's, check out the Microjig (same people who make the Gripper) splitters. I have a set mounted for my thin kerf blade and they work great.

Mount the rails so the tape zeros in line with the right side of the blade. This leaves rail across almost the entire front of the saw. I think the biggest reason to do it this way is to avoid removing and resetting the tape. This should also be done if for no other reason than to help spread some of the weight more evenly across the stand legs.

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

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Last edited by johnnie52; 12-22-2013 at 01:28 AM.
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post #65 of 74 Old 12-27-2013, 02:08 PM Thread Starter
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Here is a picture of the saw with the T2 installed:




I used one existing hole in the saw for each of the rails to start the locating of the rails. The holes turned out be the exact height I needed. It was very easy to drill through the cast iron. The only consequence of using the existing holes was that the tape strip needs to be relocated about 1" to the left (which gives me about an inch more capacity to the right). I was thinking about putting it fully to the right, but it would have been too long and the saw might have been tippy.

I cut a notch in the rear rail for the splitter/guard rod. The aluminum hub (on the rod) that the splitter attaches to was adjustable, so I slid it back about 3/8" to avoid having to modify it to clear the rear rail. Here is a better view of the splitter/rod area:



It took about 1 1/2 hours to install, and this includes readjusting the alignment of the cast iron wings because they were off a little.

Tonight I will relocated the On/Off switch to the left side where I can hit it with my leg if necessary to turn it off. I never did like having it on the right side where I had to put my head in line with the blade to reach it.

Steve
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post #66 of 74 Old 12-27-2013, 02:22 PM
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Steve . . . What kind of drill bit did you use to drill through the table top cast iron to drill your additional hole(s) for the guide rail?

TOM

Understanding that you may not see success instantly, but that all your good decisions add up to a cumulative success over time is what separates those who "get there" and those who don't. Every day you either get further away from your goals, or closer to them . . . Its up to YOU."
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post #67 of 74 Old 12-27-2013, 02:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainMarvel View Post
Steve . . . What kind of drill bit did you use to drill through the table top cast iron to drill your additional hole(s) for the guide rail?
Cast iron is easy to drill. Any twist bit will do. Steel is tougher, but not that hard either.

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post #68 of 74 Old 12-27-2013, 02:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NetDoc View Post
Cast iron is easy to drill. Any twist bit will do. Steel is tougher, but not that hard either.
I've just never done it before and I'm going to have to - as I bought the same T2 fence to install on my older craftsman contractor saw. Any particular recommendation(s) - both type of bit and size for this kind of project?

Also, I'm assuming I can use a hand-held power drill for this, correct?

TOM

Understanding that you may not see success instantly, but that all your good decisions add up to a cumulative success over time is what separates those who "get there" and those who don't. Every day you either get further away from your goals, or closer to them . . . Its up to YOU."
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post #69 of 74 Old 12-27-2013, 02:58 PM
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Use a couple of bits - start small'ish (1/4 or so) and work your way up.

2 recommendations:
- use a drift punch for your start spot
- drill at low/very slow rpms; you'll see when you start drilling the difference in your progress depending on your bit speed (yes handheld is fine; battery powered is no issue)

Get to it already; we've been waiting for weeks.
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post #70 of 74 Old 12-27-2013, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainMarvel View Post
I've just never done it before and I'm going to have to - as I bought the same T2 fence to install on my older craftsman contractor saw. Any particular recommendation(s) - both type of bit and size for this kind of project?

Also, I'm assuming I can use a hand-held power drill for this, correct?
I used titanium-nitride coated twist drills from Harbor Freight. Since HF is hardly the highest quality stuff, this means even cheaper bits will work. The cast iron is surprisingly easy to drill through. As other have said, start with a small bit and work your way up using a LOT OF OIL. The oil will keep the bits from overheating and dulling.

The front screws are 3/8" diameter. The rail has holes that are countersunk for the flat head screws included in the T2 kit. The actual hole in the rail is larger than 3/8" so you can't use it as a guide for the 3/8" drill bit. I used a center punch and eyeballed the center of the hole.

To mount the rear rail I used the included 7/16" socket-head bolts/washers/nuts.

Using the two existing holes (one front, one back)made it a lot easier to mount it. I placed one front rail screw in the existing hole and that held the rail in place while I "teeter-tottered" the rail on the screw to align it at both ends and then clamped the ends to the table. The negative to using the existing holes is that the tape on the rail must be repositioned (I haven't done that yet).

The existing hole I used for the rear rail was too small for the 7/16" bolt, so I had to drill it larger and slightly off-center (higher up) from the existing hole. I clamped the rear rail in place and used the 7/16" hole in the rail as a guide to drill the hole.

Yes, I did use a hand drill and there was plenty of power. For the front rail, I tipped the saw onto its rear side so I was drilling vertically instead of horizontally to make it easier. Then I tipped it onto the front for the rear rail.

Make sure to check that none of the screw holes will be in a web area of the cast iron. Mine didn't have that problem, but I noticed that if I had aligned the tape pointer (in the existing location) with the blade at the zero mark there would have been interference with some of the webbing. I don't know how many variations of cast-iron tables Sears made over the years, so "your results may vary" (as the ads say).

Steve
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post #71 of 74 Old 12-27-2013, 07:09 PM
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You can use WD-40 in a pinch if you need cutting oil and don't have any. It's not as good, but, it'll get the job done.
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post #72 of 74 Old 12-27-2013, 10:32 PM
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Steve
Good deal for you with the new fence, that actually works. My question to you is why did you leave the waffle extensions on the saw? You will be much better off with shop made extensions. Just cut some nice flat plywood of your liking and either cover it with formica or varnish it. I have the same piece of plywood on my Unisaw as when I bought the saw over 25 years ago.

Also I haven't found anything better to protect the top of the saw with than WD40. Use it to sand the top to a smoother finish and wipe it off. It will soak in and form the best protection.

Al

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Last edited by Al B Thayer; 12-27-2013 at 10:36 PM.
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post #73 of 74 Old 12-27-2013, 11:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cambriahouse View Post
Here is a picture of the saw with the T2 installed:
Nicely done on the install, it looks excellent. Give everyone your impressions on the difference it is making.
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post #74 of 74 Old 12-28-2013, 12:05 AM
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Steve,

Its nice to see that I'm not the only one who updated an old Craftsman "flex drive" saw. However, I am somewhat jealous that you got both the guard and the insert plate with yours.

I also have the cast iron wings and really like them over the pressed steel wings on newer saws. Since my saw lives on a carport, using plywood is out of the question due to the Florida weather and its destructive abilities on any wood left outside. I've had to move and/or replace the out feed shelf a couple of times because of things coming apart after a heavy rain.

I also mounted a router table to mine. Makes ripping then shaping pretty easy with both machines on the same base.

I took the other route when I mounted my T2. I used one original hole and then I drilled the rails rather than the saw top. Drilling wasn't a problem, but countersinking them was difficult for me as I do not own metal counter sinks. Ended up using one of those HF step drills to get the screws buried in the new holes.

Funny thing though, I mounted mine and did not need to reposition the ruler. Maybe we picked different holes to start with.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rbk123 View Post
Nicely done on the install, it looks excellent. Give everyone your impressions on the difference it is making.
My impression of the old saw with a new fence is that the fence was the best tool investment I'd made up to that time. It took a machine that was a royal PITA to get a good cut out of and turned it into the kind of thing I'll use until either the motor or the flex cable dies before getting a new one. I've ripped everything from extremely thin strips to resawing 8/4 Cherry and every cut is dead on the mark. Best $140.00 I ever spent for the shop. (which means that I spent more for the fence than I did for the saw.... )

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

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Last edited by johnnie52; 12-28-2013 at 12:14 AM.
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