Trying to figure out what's causing sanding marks - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 07-15-2017, 11:57 AM Thread Starter
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Trying to figure out what's causing sanding marks

Been dealing with these marks for a while not really sure what's causing them. I start with 60 grit and sand for about 5 to 10 minutes going slow and steady. Then move to 120 then 220. The marks seem to appear more when I use 220.

I'm using a new Dewalt ROS. I just can't figure out what I am doing wrong. Would these be considered swirl marks? Any help would be great.

Ryan
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post #2 of 10 Old 07-15-2017, 04:11 PM
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You are probably still seeing the marks from using 60 grit. What are you sanding that requires that rough of sand paper?

I cannot tell what your pictures are. If you are trying to sand off paint then you are starting with the wrong product. You need paint stripper.

100 grit is normally the largest grit I use. It would have to be a very large surface before I ever sanded one item for 5 to 10 minutes.

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post #3 of 10 Old 07-15-2017, 04:36 PM
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It's called swirl marks. Some sanders are more prone to it than others. When you sand with 60x paper it makes very deep scratches into the wood which takes a lot of sanding to get rid of. If you are going to make a jump from 60 to 120 grit paper it would help if you would wet the wood and allow it to dry before sanding. Still it takes a lot of sanding to get rid of 60 grit swirl marks. I suspect you are just not sanding long enough with the 120 grit paper. Then wet the wood again when you go to 220 grit paper. If you look close if there is any swirl marks still there you should be able to see it when wet. Better to see it then before putting stain on.
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post #4 of 10 Old 07-15-2017, 04:46 PM
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In my experience, 60 grit disks don't always have consistent grit, so sometime there's a larger chunk that makes a deep scratch that's hard to remove. I also wouldn't go from 60 to 120. I'd do 60, then 80, then 100, 120,150,180 with the random orbit sander, then sand 220 by hand, with the grain, using a hard foam block.
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post #5 of 10 Old 07-15-2017, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
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The reason I started using 60 grit on my frames is to remove lots of material. I started using 60 for the frames I make out of furring strips. Its tough to get the furring strips all the same thickness so a lot of the time one side of the miter would be sticking up a sixteenth or eighth. 60 was very fast at flattening the frame.

I think you guys might be right and 60 is too rough to start with. I will try starting with 100 and see if that helps.

I was wetting the wood to raise the grain but didn't know I had to let it dry.

The pictures are scalloped frames I make and sell. I just stained them after sanding the **** out of them.
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post #6 of 10 Old 07-15-2017, 07:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrosephMansby View Post
The reason I started using 60 grit on my frames is to remove lots of material. I started using 60 for the frames I make out of furring strips. Its tough to get the furring strips all the same thickness so a lot of the time one side of the miter would be sticking up a sixteenth or eighth. 60 was very fast at flattening the frame.

I think you guys might be right and 60 is too rough to start with. I will try starting with 100 and see if that helps.

I was wetting the wood to raise the grain but didn't know I had to let it dry.

The pictures are scalloped frames I make and sell. I just stained them after sanding the **** out of them.
You might consider getting a belt sander. It takes a bit of practice to sand with it by will level uneven lumber a lot quicker. Then you could start with a finer grit paper with the finish sander.
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post #7 of 10 Old 12-12-2018, 06:18 PM Thread Starter
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I figured out what was causing the marks and it wasnt sand paper or the sander. It was the way I was applying the stain to the wood. If you don't apply the stain in a sweeping motion with the grain it will create those goofy lines.
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post #8 of 10 Old 12-12-2018, 09:13 PM
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Thank you for taking the time to share the answer!
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post #9 of 10 Old 12-13-2018, 12:55 AM
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learn how to take a photo ...

The photos you provided made more of the white background than of the frame you were trying to show. I finally figured that out after rereading the thread several times. To show anything at it's best, especially when asking a question like yours, remove all background "noise"... and place the item on plain paper or a clean sheet. Then the specific issue will be the only thing to see. You are trying to communicate visually and have introduced unneccessary info.

The other issue is poor lighting. When trying to show fine detail, a light that shines at an low angle will make any small lines more pronounced. We can't see what we don't know is there and good lighting will help.

Glad you solved you problem on your own.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-13-2018 at 12:58 AM.
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post #10 of 10 Old 12-13-2018, 06:50 AM
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When I first looked at the picture I thought the white background was snow. I then thought that couldn't be right.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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