Trueing up wood - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 10-27-2013, 10:16 PM Thread Starter
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I'm probably using the wrong terms, so lets see if I can explain it better. When go and get a peace of 8/4 that's 3' long and both sides (front and back) are rough it probably if not true, at 1" from the end it measures 10 1/2" at the other end it measure 10 3/4". What do I needed to to make it true (perfectly straight) on one of the edges? Thanks, I hope I used the right terms and explained it right. Eric

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post #2 of 10 Old 10-28-2013, 12:02 AM
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It would be easier if you had a 12" jointer but that is a expensive commercial machine. You could get by with a 12" planer if you make a sled for it go hold the board flat while you send it through. Depending on what kind of wood it is and the machine you use it would be a matter of taking about a 32nd off each side until you get down to the thickness you desire. Then the edges could be straightened on any little jointer, even a table top model.

You might check out woodenthings planer sled. http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/pl...d-rails-14940/
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post #3 of 10 Old 10-28-2013, 12:55 AM
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Not sure if this is what you are. After, when I true up 'both side bad wood I use the usual method of screwing it to a straight edged piece of wood with one edge of the straight wood proud and run the straight edge down the table saw fence, giving me one straight side of my project wood. This is so simplistic to most woodworkers I am not sure if I have read the problem properly

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post #4 of 10 Old 10-28-2013, 02:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonycan View Post
Not sure if this is what you are. After, when I true up 'both side bad wood I use the usual method of screwing it to a straight edged piece of wood with one edge of the straight wood proud and run the straight edge down the table saw fence, giving me one straight side of my project wood. This is so simplistic to most woodworkers I am not sure if I have read the problem properly
I use a piece of half inch plywood about eight inches wide with two DeStaco clamps and a block glued at the back to keep the wood from slipping backward. Same idea as tonycan. Set the rip fence where ever it needs to be.

Although if I read the OP right just joint one edge and rip to parallel. If it is the faces are rough and the thickness is the problem you are back to planing and winding sticks or finding a wide enough jointer to borrow or buy.
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post #5 of 10 Old 10-29-2013, 12:12 AM
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The basics of woodworking is to get one face true and flat before working the other side and edges. If the board, in the rough, is not flat, I recommend making a sled longer than the board and fasten a cleat to the back end so the board will not slide off as you pass it through a planer. Here is the trick that I found. Wherever the board does not touch the sled (make sure the sled is flat on a table), add a shim underneath. You can tape it in place to hold it. These shims will keep the planer rollers from pushing the board down as it passes through the planer. This method will take a bow or a twist out of a board. Expect to lose a lot of thickness. If the board is twisted, you can put shims under opposite corners at the ends so that some thickness is taken off both ends rather than all the thickness being taken off from one end and really losing a lot of thickness in the final product.

Once you get one side true and flat, then you can flip the board and flatten the other side. Then, you are ready to true the edges. Here again, you can use a sled to rip the first edge on the table saw by having that edge hang over the one edge of the sled and using the true edge of the sled against the fence. You will need to fasten the board to the fence so it cannot wander. Once you have one edge straight and square on the table saw, then you can run it across a jointer, if you have one.

Now, you are ready to trim the second edge. Set the table saw to the width you want, or a little extra if you have a jointer, then rip the board to size.
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post #6 of 10 Old 10-29-2013, 01:25 AM
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Anguspapa - Just to repeat what has already been said - work one face 1st. If using a planer, then make a sled as mentioned and shim the stock so it doesn't rock. You can also accomplish the task using a router sled or a hand plane (jack plane would be a good choice [ Firemedic or Chris, jump in if I'm choosing the wrong plane since you guys are the hand tool guru in my book]).

Once you have a flat ("true") surface, then you need to flip the board and plane the opposite surface. As for the edges, same principal, work one edge true, then the other. If you have a small jointer, use it. If not, the table saw can do it. At this stage, I use a different method (best method for me). I will choose the concave edge and tack a straight edge overlapping the edge. I will then rip a straight edge on the opposite side by riding the temporary edge along the table saw edge. I know you know the rest of the story...

Its' never hot or cold in New Hampshire... its' always seasonal.
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post #7 of 10 Old 10-29-2013, 09:25 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you everyone for giving me my lesson. But, I did explain what I wanted to do wrong. When I buy my wood the faces are perfect. See, there's 1, you made me explain the "face" of the wood wright. It's the "edges" that need to be fixed. After listening to everyone on line here, I learned that I'll need to make a sled for my table saw. I only can wish for a joiner. :( Eric

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post #8 of 10 Old 10-29-2013, 12:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anguspapa View Post
Thank you everyone for giving me my lesson. But, I did explain what I wanted to do wrong. When I buy my wood the faces are perfect. See, there's 1, you made me explain the "face" of the wood wright. It's the "edges" that need to be fixed. After listening to everyone on line here, I learned that I'll need to make a sled for my table saw. I only can wish for a joiner. :( Eric
If it's the narrow edges, the table saw is probably the fastest way (once you have a sled). You can also do that with a hand-plane, if you prefer: pick whichever edge is straighter as the reference edge, and make a mark at the appropriate width measuring from that edge. Then use a handplane (I'd use a jack, Stanley #5 or equivalent) to remove everything that's outside the line, and a jointer (Stanley #7 or 8, or equivalent) to make it straight.

That's a lot more work, though. I enjoy doing it, but I'm weird.
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post #9 of 10 Old 10-29-2013, 12:54 PM
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How I make edges straight

I'm assuming your piece is about 3 feet long. I find the most concave edge of the board, use HMG in several places to fasten it to a 4' level. (All done on the TS top. The level must travel with the work piece.) With the level against the fence, trim 1 edge as far as you deem necessary. Remove the level, flip the board, and trim the other edge. Works for me.

The worst thing you can do to a piece of wood is
....get blood on it.

Dr. Durdy Olman, Phd. (BS)
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post #10 of 10 Old 10-29-2013, 04:13 PM
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Lee Valley sells a pair of simple, 2-sided clamps. I have a very straight 3" strip of birch plywood that I clamp into one side. That will ride against the TS fence. The banana is clamped into the other side of each clamping fixture. The set-up works better than I expected.

My use? To give me a clean and straight edge in 24" slabs of split western red cedar. Some really good ones pop out near very large knots to put a pronounced and useful 'wave form' in the slab. I'll carve into the faces anyway so 'flat' isn't relevant. I have a two-handed planer knife with a gentle sweep to smooth any wavy surface as much as I care to do.
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