Trestle Table - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 03-11-2013, 10:25 PM Thread Starter
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Trestle Table

My daughter has asked that I build a trestle table using 2 x 12`s for the top. My concern is the planks will tend to bow or cup with time. My question is, if I run them through a thickness planer will that lessen warp of the planks?
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post #2 of 9 Old 03-11-2013, 10:58 PM
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Planing them will not make the lumber more stable. What type of lumber is it? Will it be inside or outside? Is the lumber fully dry?
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post #3 of 9 Old 03-11-2013, 11:00 PM
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No, your material needs to be dry before assembling.

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OH, wait a minute ............Yep!.............That's what he said!

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post #4 of 9 Old 03-12-2013, 12:39 AM
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It would be more stable if you used smaller boards than 2x12's.
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post #5 of 9 Old 03-12-2013, 12:43 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firemedic View Post
Planing them will not make the lumber more stable. What type of lumber is it? Will it be inside or outside? Is the lumber fully dry?
I think she's thinking pine, inside and does kiln dried qualify? I seem to recall seeing somewhere a handheld gadget that measures moisture content, do I need one of those?
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post #6 of 9 Old 03-12-2013, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by oakcutter View Post
I think she's thinking pine, inside and does kiln dried qualify? I seem to recall seeing somewhere a handheld gadget that measures moisture content, do I need one of those?
Is it construction pine - fir? It's notoriously unstable despite being "kiln" dried as it's not near the % of furniture stock. If you plan to let it dry for a while as well as plan to joint it a couple times with periods of rest.

Do you plan to build a lot of furniture? You certainly don't need a moisture meter to build this table. They are handy if you make a career out of it or frequently buy lots from mom n pop sawyers that you don't know well.

You may save money and a bucket of tears by investigating hardwood lumber yards in your area as opposed to resorting to construction lumber.
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post #7 of 9 Old 03-12-2013, 10:34 AM
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It sounds like you are considering construction lumber for the table top. Not the best material.

This link explains the different grades of construction lumber and the different moisture contents.

http://www.sbcindustry.com/images/pu...r%20grades.pdf

KD is max 19% moisture content at the time of milling.

KD-15 is max 15%.

A hardwood lumber mill which kiln dries, may dry to 11-12% depending on how the operator runs the kiln.

Whatever wood you purchase is going to experience moisture change. Typically this will be loosing moisture to get to the same moisture content as your shop and later the room in which the project is placed. Hence it is possible you make the item, it looks fine, then you move it to an air conditioned room, and it "moves" aka, twists, cracks etc. due to the room having even less moisture.

There are many threads on the forum about people having problems making projects from construction lumber.

If your daughter insists on using construction lumber, I would use 2x4 rather than 2x12. It is easier to find straight boards in the "Premium" grades of construction lumber. Some may have waxed ends to reduce cracking, perhaps the KD-15 moisture content.

The narrower boards will crack less, and if one decides to crack or twist, it will be easier and less expensive to replace.

As others have commented, planing does not stabilize the wood. If I am using construction lumber, I may plane it to get a smoother surface or remove scratches/chips from the mill. Perhaps a good idea for a table top. I only take off perhaps 1/64in. A light pass.
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post #8 of 9 Old 03-12-2013, 12:55 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks to all who have chimed in, this newbie appreciates it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Paine View Post
It sounds like you are considering construction lumber for the table top. Not the best material.

This link explains the different grades of construction lumber and the different moisture contents.

http://www.sbcindustry.com/images/pu...r%20grades.pdf

KD is max 19% moisture content at the time of milling.

KD-15 is max 15%.

A hardwood lumber mill which kiln dries, may dry to 11-12% depending on how the operator runs the kiln.

Whatever wood you purchase is going to experience moisture change. Typically this will be loosing moisture to get to the same moisture content as your shop and later the room in which the project is placed. Hence it is possible you make the item, it looks fine, then you move it to an air conditioned room, and it "moves" aka, twists, cracks etc. due to the room having even less moisture.

There are many threads on the forum about people having problems making projects from construction lumber.

If your daughter insists on using construction lumber, I would use 2x4 rather than 2x12. It is easier to find straight boards in the "Premium" grades of construction lumber. Some may have waxed ends to reduce cracking, perhaps the KD-15 moisture content.

The narrower boards will crack less, and if one decides to crack or twist, it will be easier and less expensive to replace.

As others have commented, planing does not stabilize the wood. If I am using construction lumber, I may plane it to get a smoother surface or remove scratches/chips from the mill. Perhaps a good idea for a table top. I only take off perhaps 1/64in. A light pass.
This will be my first attempt at building a table and so my concern is maintaining a flat surface that stays that way.
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post #9 of 9 Old 03-12-2013, 01:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oakcutter View Post
This will be my first attempt at building a table and so my concern is maintaining a flat surface that stays that way.
As other replies mentioned, hardwood is a better material than construction lumber.

Whatever wood you purchase, let it acclimate for a few weeks before cutting/planing.

Ideally cut/plane and let is still again, as Firemedic mentioned.

You want to ensure the wood is as stable as possible before assembling. Finding a bad board before you assemble is a lot less frustrating than it is happens after assembly.

Sometimes the wood can have internal stresses which are not obvious, but can be released by cutting/ planing or shaping the wood. This can happen with the best of woods, but the cheaper woods of construction lumber have more potential.
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