Transporting a Drill Press - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 6Likes
  • 2 Post By NoThankyou
  • 2 Post By John Smith_inFL
  • 1 Post By Terry Q
  • 1 Post By subroc
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 13 Old 06-06-2020, 11:24 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Dickinson, Tx.
Posts: 4,157
View Tony B's Photo Album My Photos
Transporting a Drill Press

I know a table saw should be transported upside down and a planer right-side-up.
A drill press will probably be purchased form an individual.
What is best way to transport a floor model Drill Press in an open trailer?

Tony B Retired woodworker, among other things.


"Strive for excellence and settle for completion" Tony B
Tony B is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 Old 06-06-2020, 11:56 PM
Ancient Termite
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Huntington Beach, California
Posts: 861
View NoThankyou's Photo Album My Photos
Go to Harbor Freight and purchase 6 or 8 moving blankets. Make a pillow from these blankets and some twine. Lay the drill press down with the head at the front of the trailer and the base as close as possible to the front of the trailer. Put the pillow under the head of the drill press and secure it in place with twine. Secure the whole mishmash so it won't move around during cornering and breaking.

Let us know when you're having too much fun.
Tony B and difalkner like this.

Rich
Just a dumb old paper boy from Brooklyn, NY
NoThankyou is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to NoThankyou For This Useful Post:
Tony B (06-07-2020)
post #3 of 13 Old 06-07-2020, 12:50 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Dickinson, Tx.
Posts: 4,157
View Tony B's Photo Album My Photos
I have virtually no tools or machinery. I intend to buy mostly used stuff so I need to have all of my ducks in a row before I show up at someones house. In the past, I have almost always had Box trucks or access to them. They always had tie-downs on the walls and floor

For loading and unloading the heavy stuff, I am thinking of buying a used "Walkie Stacker" for around a Kilobuck. They are forklifts that you walk behind and are self propelled. Typically they have a 2000 lb. lift to around 9'. When I'm done, I could just sell it for what I paid.
Buying new stuff is easy, they deliver. Looking on craigsllist, I cant seem to find a decent table saw in the area for a reasonable price. I know that old iron is very good quality, but I just cant get myself to spend $1,200 on a 20 year old or older saw. What is making that hard for me is that I want a 50 to 52" fence - nothing less. I will just have to buy a Grizzly. I really want a Laguna Fusion 2. Only problem is it dont come with a long fence. I wont spend the money for a Fusion 3 so that leaves Laguna behind. A Grizzly will run around $1800 plus shipping and tax. that is probably what I will end up with. I can do without a lot of tools, but got to have a table saw.

Tony B Retired woodworker, among other things.


"Strive for excellence and settle for completion" Tony B
Tony B is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 13 Old 06-07-2020, 08:19 AM
Member
 
RickKr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: NE Oregon
Posts: 99
View RickKr's Photo Album My Photos
Curious. I have never heard of transporting a table saw on its top.

I helped a pattern maker move his shop four times, maybe five, can't remember exactly. He has three Delta UniSaw table saws. We never tipped any of them their tops. I transported a used UniSaw to and from my home and did it upright. I helped transport a good friend's metal machine shop twice. All of these transports involved all manner of machines, including very heavy ones up to around 9000 lbs, many that were tall and/or top heavy (like Bridgeport mills and one 36" capacity bandsaw).

The key to safe transport of all items, particularly heavier machines and top heavy items are the tie-downs. I find the key to effective tie-downs is using a "V" pattern, where the apex of the "V" is at the tool and the two tips of the "V" are the tie-downs. When necessary, for heavy or awkward items, I use 4 of these "V"s, one in each of four directions, front/back/side/side.

Obviously, there have to be tie-down points around the perimeter of your hauling vehicle, trailer or box truck. The machine tie-downs, the apex of the "V"s need to be around some part of the frame or sturdy, non-moveable part. Use ratchet straps for pulling tension to secure the items. Manual pull straps are not capable of pulling enough tension. I do use manual pull straps on lighter items to set one side of opposing "V"s and then use a ratchet strap on the other side to pull the tension. But, I do not trust the grip/closer on manual pull straps for serious tie-downs.

An important aspect is to tie-down high enough, above the vertical center of gravity as much as possible and in ways that cannot slip or shift during transport. On something like a floor model drill press, the heads on many can be lowered, down the column. If that is possible, loosen the locking bold/clamp and lower it about half way, so the base/underside of the head is about even with the top of your trailer sides. Lock it again, making sure it is tight and tie-down over the top of it, if the cover will handle the stress. If not, tie-down around the column just under the head.

Sometimes, it is not possible to tie high. In such a case, tie the "V"s low to secure the weight of the load and also tie over the top in a way to keep it from tipping and down.

If you ever move a bandsaw - take the table OFF - and never wrestle a bandsaw by the table. Wrestling it by the table can/will twist it out of alignment and if the saw should topple, the trunions will get broken and replacements on older saws can be difficult to find. That doesn't even account for damage to the table should it topple. I happened once in the transporting I've done. Also, if something starts to fall, get clear of is FAST. You cannot stop the fall usually and trying to just puts your limbs and body in dangers way. The guy handling that bandsaw almost lost a finger as it got stuck on part of the table as it toppled.

On something like a table saw, in addition to using "V" ties around the base, I'd also put a strap over the top to keep it down on the deck.

Once you are secured and start to roll, stop a short ways (less than a mile) and recheck all the tie-downs. I check them all again after driving longer distances, every time I stop, which is often for "potty breaks" and a bad lower back that must be given straightening and stretching often.

Good luck,

Rick

"Quality is like buying oats. If you want nice, clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes a bit cheaper."
RickKr is offline  
post #5 of 13 Old 06-07-2020, 09:16 AM
Moderator
 
John Smith_inFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 3,040
View John Smith_inFL's Photo Album My Photos
transporting shop tools

you just gotta think outside of the box sometimes.
this is how I got my 14" Delta BS home from an hour away.
hope your new shop goes well, Tony !!

Transporting a Drill Press-saw-delivery.jpg

.
JamesTinKS and faith michel like this.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.
John Smith_inFL is online now  
post #6 of 13 Old 06-07-2020, 09:29 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 834
View Terry Q's Photo Album My Photos
A drill press is easy to move. There is only a couple bolts/screws that hold the top to the rest of the unit. Just a few minutes to remove the head and transport it in two pieces.
sweensdv likes this.
Terry Q is offline  
post #7 of 13 Old 06-07-2020, 09:43 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Dickinson, Tx.
Posts: 4,157
View Tony B's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks guys.
In the past, I have usually moved a full shop at a time. Filling a big truck with tools doesn't concern me as much as moving a single tool on an open trailer. Center of gravity becomes an issue. With a fully loaded truck there is no room for anything to tip over.

@RickKr , The reason i thought about moving a table saw on its top is because I was told not to lift a table saw by its top. So that left me with flipping it over and upside down.

@John Smith_inFL , I would never had the guts to move it that way. And, thanks

Tony B Retired woodworker, among other things.


"Strive for excellence and settle for completion" Tony B
Tony B is online now  
post #8 of 13 Old 06-07-2020, 10:34 AM
Interested Observer
 
subroc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Dover, NH, USA
Posts: 1,012
View subroc's Photo Album My Photos
Well moving anything has to do with the vehicle, size of the machine, personnel to assist and equipment to move. Lifting or moving an 8" craftsman bench saw is an entirely different matter than moving a Unisaw or a Powermatic 66.


Lot of ideas out there. Depending on the drill press model it may be possible to collapse the whole thing onto itself. Drop the table. Drop the head. cushion that area. One thing to think about is what can bust off as far as handles. If you are worried just remove them


If you end up with an older Craftsman Drill Press there is a pretty good article over at Garage Journal with a procedure for moving one. Even if you choose another press it might give some ideas on safely moving one.


Good Luck
Tony B likes this.
subroc is offline  
post #9 of 13 Old 06-07-2020, 11:02 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 3,044
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
I feel so fortunate after reading all the recent posts about moving heavy tools. I made a lot of mistakes, and did not do anything correctly, but was so very lucky that none of the used tools I bought were damaged when I brought them home. I am learning a lot for the next time. Thank you all.
Tool Agnostic is offline  
post #10 of 13 Old 06-07-2020, 11:06 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Dickinson, Tx.
Posts: 4,157
View Tony B's Photo Album My Photos
I will probably have the seller help me load. Unloading, I will probably be on my own.

I havent even bought a trailer yet. I wont be able to buy anything until I actually move into the area. Now is the time to ask for advice.
It's a lot less costly than asking how to repair a broken drill press.

Tony B Retired woodworker, among other things.


"Strive for excellence and settle for completion" Tony B
Tony B is online now  
post #11 of 13 Old 06-07-2020, 02:29 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Basehor, KS (West of Kansas City)
Posts: 106
View JamesTinKS's Photo Album My Photos
I moved my entire shop 2.5 miles a little over a year ago. Most went on an open trailer. Like my younger son says, “you can’t use too many straps.” He was a movers in another life.
I just got my new shop finished. He and I moved the tools from the garage to the shop on 4 wheel HF dollys. I screwed 3/4” plywood panels into the holes put them under each leg then screwed scraps between them to hook them together. I have some 1/2” corrugated plastic sheets so we rolled them over those. Piece of cake. I moved most of the stuff myself.

JamesTinKS
I am a professional amateur woodworker.
JamesTinKS is offline  
post #12 of 13 Old 06-07-2020, 11:12 PM
Ancient Termite
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Huntington Beach, California
Posts: 861
View NoThankyou's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickKr View Post
Curious. I have never heard of transporting a table saw on its top.
The cast iron wings are held in place by two (maybe 3) bolts each. When the rails are installed, they may or may not offer full support of the wings. Remember that the height of the rails is not very important for accuracy. If the rails are off by just skosh and a good hard bump the wing attachment bolts can snap the cast iron. And what is really bad is that the bolts are threaded into the main table of the table saw. While removing and replacing a wing is irritating, replacing the main table is a royal pain.

Rich
Just a dumb old paper boy from Brooklyn, NY
NoThankyou is offline  
post #13 of 13 Old 06-11-2020, 10:31 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 124
View Bob Vaughan's Photo Album My Photos
Twist the table 90º and raise it as far as you can. Lay it down and slide it in.
For full size drill presses on a trailer, strapping is always best since they are a little heavy to deal with.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1 DP transport 5 - 1.jpg
Views:	20
Size:	197.7 KB
ID:	390975  

Click image for larger version

Name:	1 DP transport 4 - 1.jpg
Views:	24
Size:	250.8 KB
ID:	390977  

Click image for larger version

Name:	1 DP transport 3 - 1.jpg
Views:	26
Size:	264.8 KB
ID:	390979  

Click image for larger version

Name:	1 DP transport 2 - 2.jpg
Views:	20
Size:	210.5 KB
ID:	390981  

Click image for larger version

Name:	1 DP transport 2 - 1.jpg
Views:	19
Size:	221.0 KB
ID:	390983  

Click image for larger version

Name:	1 DP transport 1 - 1.jpg
Views:	21
Size:	263.4 KB
ID:	390985  

Bob Vaughan is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome