Thinkin o' gittin me one o' them high dollar TS blades. - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 10:09 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Jim West Pa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Near Neshannock creek.
Posts: 955
View Jim West Pa's Photo Album My Photos
Thinkin o' gittin me one o' them high dollar TS blades.

I jist did pretty well doin a gunshow and decided i'm gonna treat myself to a good quality TS blade.
I'm in need of experienced suggestions on what blade to buy.
I want to git one,( or 2),that are worth the cost of havin' 'em resharpened.
Leanin t'wards a Woodworker II.

"Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for me; JESUS CHRIST and the AMERICAN SOLDIER. One died for my soul,the other for my freedom."

At birth, God bestowed each & everyone of us with the most important responsibility there is..................FREE WILL.
Jim West Pa is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 10:17 AM
Junior Member
 
rseckler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: metamora,ill.
Posts: 7
View rseckler's Photo Album My Photos
I am thinking about Freud 60t. or 80t. for my Crosscut,and Freud 24t. for my rip blade. but I have heard good reports on the woodwork2,haven't used one myself.
rseckler is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to rseckler For This Useful Post:
Jim West Pa (03-28-2012)
post #3 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 10:19 AM
Senior Member
 
sawdustfactory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: North Bend, WA
Posts: 4,801
View sawdustfactory's Photo Album My Photos
I've used Freud blades for the last 12 years. Thin kerf rip and thin kerf combination on the table saw. Ultimate crosscut in the SCMS. Love em.

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
sawdustfactory is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to sawdustfactory For This Useful Post:
Jim West Pa (03-28-2012)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 10:25 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 5,465
View knotscott's Photo Album My Photos
Congrats on the gun show Jim. The WWII is a great blade, but it's worth noting that it's now available in 3 different tooth counts....30T, 40T, and the new 48T...1/8" full kerf, or 3/32" thin kerf is available for each. The 30T covers much of the same ground as the 40T, but clearly eclipses it in thicker ripping....it even still crosscuts reasonably well for many applications. The 48T also covers some of the same territory as the 40T, but clearly has the upper hand in fine crosscuts and ply cuts.

It's also worth noting that the WWII isn't alone at this level. The Infinity Super General and Freud Premier Fusion are both so good, that I believe Forrest introduced their 48T WWII in response to the stellar showing of these two blades. Both also excel at fine crosscuts and ply cuts, but also leave an exceptionally smooth edge on rip cuts. Neither of these are quite as efficient in thick ripping as the 40T (or 30T), but definitely have their niche. (both made in Italy)

The Ridge Carbide TS2000 is every bit the equal of the WWII 40T....also made in the USA, and was started by a former employee of Forrest. Huge carbide teeth, and a very well made blade.

The Tenryu Gold Medal is also in this league....made in Japan, and has a similar configuration as the 40T WWII.

Which to get ultimately depends on you, your saw, and what you cut. As good as these blades are, none are as good as a quality dedicated task blade in the extreme regions of thick ripping and fine crosscuts/ply... that approach requires owning at least two blades, none of which offer much versatility beyond their dedicated task range, so you need to change the blade out when the task changes.

Please keep us posted!

Last edited by knotscott; 03-28-2012 at 10:28 AM.
knotscott is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to knotscott For This Useful Post:
autre (03-28-2012), mike1950 (03-28-2012)
post #5 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 10:38 AM
Carpenter/ Cabinet Maker
 
Big Stud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Detroit
Posts: 32
View Big Stud's Photo Album My Photos
Typically what you are going to be cutting is usually no thicker than 1 1/2". That said, I use DeWalt 7 1/4" skill saw blades on my table saw to do most of my cutting. They will cut up to 2" thick material on my saw, and make a nice clean cut as long as they are sharp. I use the 36 tooth finish blades as a combination blade and the 24 tooth framing blade as a rip blade. They are thin kerf blades and being smaller put less strain on my saw motor to turn them. When they get dull, I just toss them out and put on a new one. At the cost of $12.00 each, it costs me less to do that than sharpening my woodworker II blade, which costs about $25.00. It also saves my good blade from all the rough cutting and it just gets used for the finer cutting and making cuts that the smaller blade just will not do.
Big Stud is offline  
post #6 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 10:54 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Jim West Pa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Near Neshannock creek.
Posts: 955
View Jim West Pa's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by knotscott View Post
Congrats on the gun show Jim. The WWII is a great blade, but it's worth noting that it's now available in 3 different tooth counts....30T, 40T, and the new 48T...1/8" full kerf, or 3/32" thin kerf is available for each. The 30T covers much of the same ground as the 40T, but clearly eclipses it in thicker ripping....it even still crosscuts reasonably well for many applications. The 48T also covers some of the same territory as the 40T, but clearly has the upper hand in fine crosscuts and ply cuts.

It's also worth noting that the WWII isn't alone at this level. The Infinity Super General and Freud Premier Fusion are both so good, that I believe Forrest introduced their 48T WWII in response to the stellar showing of these two blades. Both also excel at fine crosscuts and ply cuts, but also leave an exceptionally smooth edge on rip cuts. Neither of these are quite as efficient in thick ripping as the 40T (or 30T), but definitely have their niche. (both made in Italy)

The Ridge Carbide TS2000 is every bit the equal of the WWII 40T....also made in the USA, and was started by a former employee of Forrest. Huge carbide teeth, and a very well made blade.

The Tenryu Gold Medal is also in this league....made in Japan, and has a similar configuration as the 40T WWII.

Which to get ultimately depends on you, your saw, and what you cut. As good as these blades are, none are as good as a quality dedicated task blade in the extreme regions of thick ripping and fine crosscuts/ply... that approach requires owning at least two blades, none of which offer much versatility beyond their dedicated task range, so you need to change the blade out when the task changes.

Please keep us posted!
Thanx Scott, very informative response

I spose what i need to focus on at this time is a balde for cabinetry work for my kitchen.I'll be usin both plys and solid woods.

The only question i can think of in resposne to yer response is have you ever checked any of these blades for runout and what were yer findings ?

"Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for me; JESUS CHRIST and the AMERICAN SOLDIER. One died for my soul,the other for my freedom."

At birth, God bestowed each & everyone of us with the most important responsibility there is..................FREE WILL.
Jim West Pa is offline  
post #7 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 10:57 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Jim West Pa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Near Neshannock creek.
Posts: 955
View Jim West Pa's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Stud View Post
Typically what you are going to be cutting is usually no thicker than 1 1/2". That said, I use DeWalt 7 1/4" skill saw blades on my table saw to do most of my cutting. They will cut up to 2" thick material on my saw, and make a nice clean cut as long as they are sharp. I use the 36 tooth finish blades as a combination blade and the 24 tooth framing blade as a rip blade. They are thin kerf blades and being smaller put less strain on my saw motor to turn them. When they get dull, I just toss them out and put on a new one. At the cost of $12.00 each, it costs me less to do that than sharpening my woodworker II blade, which costs about $25.00. It also saves my good blade from all the rough cutting and it just gets used for the finer cutting and making cuts that the smaller blade just will not do.

Pretty good idea BS. I do a lot of processin o' scrap wood, ie; pallets and toobas 'nat and yer idea o' usin 71/4 blades for this work is a good idea.
( hey, what can i say, i like to rescue and recycle wood )

"Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for me; JESUS CHRIST and the AMERICAN SOLDIER. One died for my soul,the other for my freedom."

At birth, God bestowed each & everyone of us with the most important responsibility there is..................FREE WILL.
Jim West Pa is offline  
post #8 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 12:07 PM
Senior Member
 
bob sacamano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: la mirada ca
Posts: 566
View bob sacamano's Photo Album My Photos
go will the woodworker II. you wont be disappointed.

build it right or not at all
bob sacamano is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to bob sacamano For This Useful Post:
Jim West Pa (03-28-2012)
post #9 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 12:19 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,991
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
I like a Freud 80 tooth teflon coated blade.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #10 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 12:47 PM
Senior Member
 
Cliff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 441
View Cliff's Photo Album My Photos
Ridge Carbide Ghudo Tenru Not Forrest. Since the old man passed they have been dropping the ball.
Cliff is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Cliff For This Useful Post:
Jim West Pa (03-28-2012)
post #11 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 02:43 PM
RAM Man
 
sweensdv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: WI
Posts: 718
View sweensdv's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliff View Post
Ridge Carbide Ghudo Tenru Not Forrest. Since the old man passed they have been dropping the ball.
I have not heard that about Forrest. What do you mean?

To the OP, my recommendation would be a Ridge Carbide General Purpose Blade(TS2000) and also a Freud LU73M010 blade for plywood use.

Dave

Life is like a roll of toilet paper.
The closer it gets to the end, the faster it goes.
sweensdv is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to sweensdv For This Useful Post:
Jim West Pa (03-28-2012)
post #12 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 03:04 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Jim West Pa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Near Neshannock creek.
Posts: 955
View Jim West Pa's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
I like a Freud 80 tooth teflon coated blade.
Mmm.. now that ya meantion it Steve, i believe i may allready have that one. Or..maybe its the 60T.

"Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for me; JESUS CHRIST and the AMERICAN SOLDIER. One died for my soul,the other for my freedom."

At birth, God bestowed each & everyone of us with the most important responsibility there is..................FREE WILL.
Jim West Pa is offline  
post #13 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 04:30 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 5,465
View knotscott's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim West Pa View Post
Thanx Scott, very informative response

I spose what i need to focus on at this time is a balde for cabinetry work for my kitchen.I'll be usin both plys and solid woods.

The only question i can think of in resposne to yer response is have you ever checked any of these blades for runout and what were yer findings ?
Runout is minimal on all of them, and is a characteristic that sets the premium blades apart from others. Even if I found more runout on one, it doesn't mean that it pertains to all, so I'm sure you can find isolated stories of excessive runout with any of these.

For kitchen cabinets with ply and solid wood, I think I'd lean toward one of the cleaner cutters like the Super General, Fusion, or WWII 48T....they have steeper top bevels that leave less tearout, and shouldn't have any trouble with the thicknesses used for cabinets. If you want the absolute best performance in ply and ultra fine crosscuts, I'd grab a higher tooth count Hi-ATB blade like the Freud LU80, Infinity 010-080, Forrest Duraline, CMT Orange 210.080.10, or Amana Tool MB10-800....you'd need to compliment it with a rip blade for thicker materials though.
knotscott is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to knotscott For This Useful Post:
Jim West Pa (03-28-2012)
post #14 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 05:28 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,844
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim West Pa View Post
I jist did pretty well doin a gunshow and decided i'm gonna treat myself to a good quality TS blade.
I'm in need of experienced suggestions on what blade to buy.
I want to git one,( or 2),that are worth the cost of havin' 'em resharpened.
Leanin t'wards a Woodworker II.
What saw(s) are you going to use these blades on. What will you be cutting?

Difficult to give a good answer without knowing this information.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #15 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 07:50 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Jim West Pa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Near Neshannock creek.
Posts: 955
View Jim West Pa's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
What saw(s) are you going to use these blades on. What will you be cutting?

Difficult to give a good answer without knowing this information.

George
Good point George. I hadn't given that any thot before postin my question.
It/they will be used only on a Grizzly 1023

"Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for me; JESUS CHRIST and the AMERICAN SOLDIER. One died for my soul,the other for my freedom."

At birth, God bestowed each & everyone of us with the most important responsibility there is..................FREE WILL.
Jim West Pa is offline  
post #16 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 08:59 PM
Wood Snob
 
Al B Thayer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 5,960
View Al B Thayer's Photo Album My Photos
Does anybody remember the Systamatic Blades? I used to buy them and haven't found anything I liked better than their glue joint blade. Had them sharpened and they were never the same. I have not had good luck with blade sharpeners. Now I'm using Freud. I just have one blade for any hardwood and a cheap one for soft wood and crap wood.

IMHO high dollar blades are usually good and cheaper ones are never.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.


Al B Thayer is offline  
post #17 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 10:23 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 5,465
View knotscott's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al B Thayer View Post
Does anybody remember the Systamatic Blades? ....
Still around the last I knew. They used to be made in the USA, but had read that some (if not all) were now made in the Czech Republic.
knotscott is offline  
post #18 of 20 Old 03-28-2012, 11:05 PM
Senior Member
 
dodgeboy77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Bucks County, PA
Posts: 1,768
View dodgeboy77's Photo Album My Photos
You guys got me curious about the Ridge Carbide blades. I looked at their web site to find that they dropped the price on the TS2000, 40T to $99 and introduced a 48T Ultra TS2000 for $20 more http://ridgecarbidetool.com/saws-and...aw-blades.html . They're based in Lynhurst, NJ.

I downloaded their catalog and found they have a factory outlet that's not that far from me. Hmm.

Bill
dodgeboy77 is offline  
post #19 of 20 Old 03-29-2012, 01:22 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 5,465
View knotscott's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by dodgeboy77 View Post
You guys got me curious about the Ridge Carbide blades. I looked at their web site to find that they dropped the price on the TS2000, 40T to $99 and introduced a 48T Ultra TS2000 for $20 more http://ridgecarbidetool.com/saws-and...aw-blades.html . They're based in Lynhurst, NJ.

I downloaded their catalog and found they have a factory outlet that's not that far from me. Hmm.

Bill
Ridge Carbide makes some great blades, they're made in the US, plus the TS2000 has very thick carbide....at one time they claimed 35% thicker carbide than Forrest. The TS2000 has a an ATB/R configuration that sports a flat tooth raker every 5th ot 7th tooth (can't remember which). It's darn hard to differentiate the cuts between a TS2000 and a WWII.

knotscott is offline  
post #20 of 20 Old 03-29-2012, 01:03 PM
RAM Man
 
sweensdv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: WI
Posts: 718
View sweensdv's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by knotscott View Post
........... The TS2000 has a an ATB/R configuration that sports a flat tooth raker every 5th ot 7th tooth (can't remember which).
In case anyone cares, it's every 5th tooth.

Dave

Life is like a roll of toilet paper.
The closer it gets to the end, the faster it goes.
sweensdv is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
750 dollar budget or less - help spend it! Work-The-Wood Dust Collection 7 01-30-2012 07:54 PM
Been thinkin about a 6" RO sander. Jim West Pa Power Tools & Machinery 13 10-21-2011 11:12 AM
I'm Gittin' me some Handplanes! Locodcdude Hand Tools 3 05-28-2011 05:21 PM
The Dollar...Paper Or Coin?? cabinetman Off Topic 19 03-23-2011 09:08 AM
What was I thinkin? woodnthings Off Topic 3 06-13-2009 11:19 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome