Teak Oil Finish - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 07-07-2011, 02:24 PM Thread Starter
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Unhappy Teak Oil Finish

Recently, I purchased teak outdoor patio furniture. I was told by everyone it needs to be treated with teak oil so I bought Waco Teak Oil Finish and it turned the furniture a golden color. It doesn’t look bad but I prefer the pale color of the wood prior to treating.

What I would like to know is will this ever fade back to the original pale color of the wood? If so, how long does it take? If not, how do I remove the oil finish and get the wood back to it’s original color?
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post #2 of 12 Old 07-07-2011, 03:38 PM
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Watco teak oil finish has no teak oil in it.
It is boiled linseed oil, with resins added to form a film finish.

If you don't like it, sanding the finish off is your only choice.

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post #3 of 12 Old 07-07-2011, 03:42 PM
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Leave it outside in the elements and it will turn grayish white after while. Few months you will notice a difference.
If it isn't teak oil the sanding it down is correct.

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post #4 of 12 Old 07-07-2011, 10:52 PM
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WTO ain't half bad stuff, but as you said it will turn things yellow... Lightly sand it with 180 grit to knock the surface film down and then as above leave it outside. The color is mostly from the film so removing some of that will help... but you will get some protection from what the grain has absorbed already.

Hope that helps!

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
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post #5 of 12 Old 07-08-2011, 08:42 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the help. I can't believe I listened to everyone and now have to spend time sanding. Do I do this by hand or with a small electric sander?
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post #6 of 12 Old 07-08-2011, 09:18 AM
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Putting an oil-based finish on your patio furniture helps to protect the wood from the elements and prevent weathering. Giving the furniture a light sanding and a coat of oil every year will help to keep it looking nice. OTOH, leaving the furniture exposed and unprotected will allow it to take on a weathered look.

Removing the finish you just put on, either by sanding or scraping, will be difficult, as it is hard to get into all the nooks and crannies and corners, and the oil-based finish takes a long time to fully cure, so the oils will still be gummy enough to quickly clog your sandpaper, instead of just turning to dust.

IMO, learn to love the color of the protected wood, as it looks better than it would weathered, and trying to sand that fresh oil finish off to the original color, uniformly and without cross-grain sanding scratches, will be a real PITA.

Timothy
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post #7 of 12 Old 07-08-2011, 09:51 AM
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I would try using a chemical stripper before doing any sanding. I would start with a waterbase stripper, like Citristrip. It may take more than one application. If that doesn't do it, try an MC (methylene chloride) based stripper. It's very toxic...follow instructions to the letter.

If there is any finish left, wipe off with lacquer thinner, or acetone. If there is anything left after all the previous...sand. Do all of the aforementioned in a well ventilated area over some type of ground/floor covering.








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post #8 of 12 Old 07-08-2011, 01:54 PM Thread Starter
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Leaving it the way it is really isn't an option. I don't care how long it takes...I don't like it. Since Watco Teak Oil isn't really teak oil (they shouldn't be allowed to market it that way) but linseed oil I Googled removing linseed oil and found out that turpentine will remove it.

Since I only applied one coat and then wiped off any excess after 30 minutes it isn't sticky at all. It's very smooth and dry so maybe sanding it won't be such a problem but I will try the turpentine first on a small area.
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post #9 of 12 Old 07-08-2011, 02:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnMV8 View Post
Leaving it the way it is really isn't an option. I don't care how long it takes...I don't like it. Since Watco Teak Oil isn't really teak oil (they shouldn't be allowed to market it that way) but linseed oil I Googled removing linseed oil and found out that turpentine will remove it.

Since I only applied one coat and then wiped off any excess after 30 minutes it isn't sticky at all. It's very smooth and dry so maybe sanding it won't be such a problem but I will try the turpentine first on a small area.
It's not just an oil finish. There is also varnish in it. Turpentine may not remove dried varnish. Chemical stripper will, and so will lacquer thinner or acetone.








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post #10 of 12 Old 07-11-2011, 01:29 PM Thread Starter
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Firemedic, I took your advice and lightly sanded the funiture. It came off easily, very dusty, and it looks better already. Hopefully, the weather will take care of the rest but if it doesn't that's alright because the yellow finish is gone.
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post #11 of 12 Old 07-11-2011, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnMV8
Firemedic, I took your advice and lightly sanded the funiture. It came off easily, very dusty, and it looks better already. Hopefully, the weather will take care of the rest but if it doesn't that's alright because the yellow finish is gone.
Great! Glad to hear that it's been (mostly) resolved!

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
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post #12 of 12 Old 07-11-2011, 04:59 PM
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Just a note about Teak oil.


There are two types of teak oil for use in interior and exterior environments.


The exterior is typically found in a marine supply store and is thicker. It is not really intended for fine furniture use. (DAMHIKT)


The interior is usually available in furniture stores, much thinner and dries quicker.


If your furniture is outside and exposed to any kind of elements I would suggest using the marine exterior stuff. It may take a few days to dry but it will protect your outdoor furniture.

All of the teak oil that I have applied (interior and exterior) tend to make the wood look richer, brings out the grain and colors the wood toward a ridish / brownish warmer color. The weathered look of grey is transformed to this warmer look.

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
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Remember that when we have the "BIG ONE" everything east of the Rockies falls into the ocean.
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