Tamko roofing shingles. - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 17 Old 08-04-2015, 08:50 PM Thread Starter
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Tamko roofing shingles.

Anyone ever use em. I did some repair work on a customers which had Tamko shingles on it. The part of the house that was in the sun the most were pretty worn showing the fiberglass webbing in a lot of spots. I then notified them and asked how old they were. To me they looked close to 20 years old. Then the customer told me they had the house re-roofed in 2009. It about blew me away. The roof on my house is about 30 years old and in much better condition. They were Owen Corning though.
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post #2 of 17 Old 08-04-2015, 11:43 PM
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I've used both and they DON'T make either like they did 30 yrs ago (to LAST!!!)....UNCLE SAM is always removing the stuff that makes them last.

I've also had issues with the Owens Corning getting them to warranty....it was a PAIN but they couldn't get out of it because I was to their specs and above with the installation so they prorated them to get even. A 3-5 yr old roof is considered new and should still look like it and be treated as new IMO.... I understand prorating a 15 yr old on a 20 yr shingle, it's almost used up.

Both companies have had to go through the learning curve after certian ingredients were removed for our health. My opinion they keep getting thinner and that's the quickest degrader to lasting a long time, the heat destroys the small amount of asphalt/tar base causing premature granuale release.

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post #3 of 17 Old 08-04-2015, 11:47 PM
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Steve
Tamko is a major player in the metroplex. They used to be good about standing behind their product, especially if this is the homeowner that bought them in 2009. A lot of shingles now have transferable warranties.
We've had some good hail storms in some areas. Could the damage be from that?
Since GAF bought Elk, the choices for this area seem to be more limited.
Owens Corning and Tamko.
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post #4 of 17 Old 08-05-2015, 12:03 AM Thread Starter
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My customer was the homeowner that had the roofing work done in 2009 so there is nothing transferable. Their biggest problem with warranty may be the roofing company did a lousy job of installing them. They were laminated shingles and they nailed them too high to catch the lower half. There were about a dozen shingles I had to delaminate new shingles to get the lower half and slide up under the other shingles to replace what was missing. What might save them is the area that is going bad I didn't have to do any patching.

On top of everything else the roofer that did the work charged them $165.00 a square for the shingles plus labor for the roof. I bought a bundle of them this morning for $25.26 including tax. I guess University Park folks don't check prices.

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post #5 of 17 Old 08-05-2015, 12:13 AM
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Wow, if that price was for the same shingle, that's a lot of difference.
And poor workmanship on top of that high price = major rip-off.
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post #6 of 17 Old 08-05-2015, 04:06 AM
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Steve: you already stated it was a bad install.How was the roof vented?This has a lot to do with how long the shingles will last.How about trees overhanging the roof.
Can't get Tamco in this area anymore but have used a lot of them in the past with good results.Always preferred them over OC.
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post #7 of 17 Old 08-05-2015, 08:57 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by mako1 View Post
Steve: you already stated it was a bad install.How was the roof vented?This has a lot to do with how long the shingles will last.How about trees overhanging the roof.
Can't get Tamco in this area anymore but have used a lot of them in the past with good results.Always preferred them over OC.
The attic is vented with attic fans. The area of the roof with the problem has no tree overhang and had full sun all day. I believe this was the problem with the shingles. Still for a roof to look 20 years old in 6 years was too much.
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post #8 of 17 Old 08-05-2015, 02:39 PM
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I agree none of the manufacturers make shingles the way they used to. Has anyone noticed the downgrade of warrantees and restrictions especially in wind resistance? I recently heard from one of our local Lumb yds IKO is involved in some sort of class action suit regarding their shingles.

I remember when Fiberglas shingles debuted, thin as all get out, if they were installed in early spring or during the winter they usually ended up with the TTW snapping up and off from wind. Up till they sold out Bird and their organic Fireline shingles were my go to for any and all jobs.

Back in 2000 GAF used to have a great 40-50 yr HD line w/warranty, considering the cost of the product, twice everyone else for ocean side living it was worth it. Now the warrantees are life time, only as long as one owns the property, void if sold.

I've also seen architectural shingles prematurely fall apart, it happens, lousy batch ocean side exposed to direct sun all day.

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post #9 of 17 Old 08-05-2015, 05:55 PM
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Just out of curiosity Steve, were the 'new' shingles in '09 run over existing shingles? Around here "re-roofing" is generally considered putting new shingles over old ones, which some folks still do although it's mostly an outdated practice here. "Replacing the shingles" is tear out and fresh everything.

Everyone I've talked to in the biz says that "re-roofing" will deteriorate the new shingles much faster.
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post #10 of 17 Old 08-05-2015, 07:03 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Chamfer View Post
Just out of curiosity Steve, were the 'new' shingles in '09 run over existing shingles? Around here "re-roofing" is generally considered putting new shingles over old ones, which some folks still do although it's mostly an outdated practice here. "Replacing the shingles" is tear out and fresh everything.

Everyone I've talked to in the biz says that "re-roofing" will deteriorate the new shingles much faster.
No, the homeowner had wooden shingles on their house and the area they live in banned wooden shingles so everything was removed and a new deck and roof was installed. Except for them not placing the nails in the right place for architectural shingles it couldn't have been installed better.

I noticed on the new Tamko shingles I bought they have a white line on the shingles where to place the nails now. The old shingles didn't have that. Personally I'm surprised they came apart. I had a terrible time getting the new shingles apart. I had to lay them in the sun for a half hour and then use a heat gun and a butcher knife to get them apart.
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post #11 of 17 Old 08-05-2015, 08:02 PM
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I had a terrible time getting the new shingles apart. I had to lay them in the sun for a half hour and then use a heat gun and a butcher knife to get them apart.
Not sure I got it right, the shingle were stuck together. The 2 reasons I ever had for struck together shingles.

1. The shingles were at the bottom of the pallet and or there was another pallet on top of it for some time before and or after it arrived at the Lumb yd. Compressed shingles

2. The shingles got very hot sitting out in the sun before the bundle was busted. Melted grease tabs

Compressed bundles, I don't ever recall finding a solution for it, the Co I worked for when learning the trade would send them back to the lumb yd or warehouse. You don't get paid for damaged shingles and the Lumb yd/warehouse wouldn't take them back once they were torn.

I always hated roofing during the summer, more often than not shingles got super soft from being in the sun before during and after placement that they received damage from kneeling and walking over them and too often the grease tabs would melt and seal minutes after install. When fresh bundles were sticking we used to hose them down before opening, when cooled pull a back breaker move on the bundle by dropping it onto a raised knee.

To protect them from roofing damage we hosed the completed areas to stiffen them up.

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post #12 of 17 Old 08-05-2015, 11:55 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Ghidrah View Post
Not sure I got it right, the shingle were stuck together. The 2 reasons I ever had for struck together shingles.

1. The shingles were at the bottom of the pallet and or there was another pallet on top of it for some time before and or after it arrived at the Lumb yd. Compressed shingles

2. The shingles got very hot sitting out in the sun before the bundle was busted. Melted grease tabs

Compressed bundles, I don't ever recall finding a solution for it, the Co I worked for when learning the trade would send them back to the lumb yd or warehouse. You don't get paid for damaged shingles and the Lumb yd/warehouse wouldn't take them back once they were torn.

I always hated roofing during the summer, more often than not shingles got super soft from being in the sun before during and after placement that they received damage from kneeling and walking over them and too often the grease tabs would melt and seal minutes after install. When fresh bundles were sticking we used to hose them down before opening, when cooled pull a back breaker move on the bundle by dropping it onto a raised knee.

To protect them from roofing damage we hosed the completed areas to stiffen them up.
No, I didn't mean the shingles were sticking together in the bundle. On the customers house the roofer didn't nail them in the right place and the bottom half fell off and after falling two stories were unusable again. What I was doing was taking the new shingles apart to use the bottom half for replacements. There was roughly a dozen shingles the bottom half fell off and all I was doing was patch work. The part of the roof the shingles were coming off was on a near vertical part similar to this picture. The day I did the work it was near 100 degrees and I had to put a furniture blanket between me and the roof working from a ladder. The part of the roof the shingles are showing fiberglass was on the upper more level part of the roof.
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post #13 of 17 Old 08-06-2015, 03:56 PM
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I've seen bubbling and partial separations on architectural shingles but never the entire bottom half drop off. I realize the look adds an extra texture to the roof but I was never a fan of them, mostly because I didn't like the method of manufacture.

1. The underside can't fall off if it fills the entire footprint of the shingle.
2. The bottom half can't fall out if the seal between the 2 sides doesn't fail.

Often when reroofing a house with existing architects I often noticed a lack of diligence regarding installation, undulating courses, (no course lines snapped), end/gable cuts narrower than 3", (no field ).

It's nice that nail lines are included on the shingles but means nothing when the MO of a roofer is to "gitter done". Too often on tab and jet shingle roofs I've seen 3 nails to the shingle.

1. Was it wise to separate a "good new" shingle for the bottom rather than replace the entire shingle?
2. How old was the roof, was a permit pulled, was there some way to drag back the installer to force proper repairs free of cost?

Future reference hose the area you're working in 1st to cool it down big time.

I feel for you if the job was on a mansard, they don't make roof brackets for mansards wide enough for my taste. I would have set my pumps up

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post #14 of 17 Old 08-06-2015, 08:03 PM Thread Starter
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I've seen bubbling and partial separations on architectural shingles but never the entire bottom half drop off. I realize the look adds an extra texture to the roof but I was never a fan of them, mostly because I didn't like the method of manufacture.

1. The underside can't fall off if it fills the entire footprint of the shingle.
2. The bottom half can't fall out if the seal between the 2 sides doesn't fail.

Often when reroofing a house with existing architects I often noticed a lack of diligence regarding installation, undulating courses, (no course lines snapped), end/gable cuts narrower than 3", (no field ).

It's nice that nail lines are included on the shingles but means nothing when the MO of a roofer is to "gitter done". Too often on tab and jet shingle roofs I've seen 3 nails to the shingle.

1. Was it wise to separate a "good new" shingle for the bottom rather than replace the entire shingle?
2. How old was the roof, was a permit pulled, was there some way to drag back the installer to force proper repairs free of cost?

Future reference hose the area you're working in 1st to cool it down big time.

I feel for you if the job was on a mansard, they don't make roof brackets for mansards wide enough for my taste. I would have set my pumps up
It wouldn't have been that bad a job if it wasn't for the heat. It was only about a dozen shingles and I was able to get to them from the ladder.

After seeing the architectural shingles close up and how they are made I don't think I would put them on my house. There was only an area about 1" wide where the shingles overlap. I will stick with three tap shingles. They are one piece so nothing to fall apart.

Changing the subject a little I see roofers all the time nailing 2x4's to a new roof to stand on while working because the roof is steep. I don't see what keeps the roof from leaking from all the nails from the 2x4's when they take them off. The last steep roof I did I built a platform to stand on which had ropes going over the roof and tied at ground level.
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post #15 of 17 Old 08-07-2015, 01:37 PM
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I don't like that 2X4 technique on steep roofs either, the only time we ever used them was above the work area to prevent bundles from sliding down the roof. Even experienced roofers can have weak ankles, I've seen one too many take a roll to lower staging with a sprained or dislocated ankle from slipping off the 2X4s. I constantly harped, "Feet pointing down or up roof never gable to gable."

Back in the early 80s I worked for a man that came from England, he was farmed to a roofer as a boy and learned the trade, all past and current forms from the ground up, I learned to do slate from Herb; the application is similar to the old asbestos roof and sidewall shingle tiles. The man was an encyclopedia of roofing info, metal and soldering, roll, rubber, hot tar, resaturant, emulsion, slate.

I'm guessing the roofers you saw using the 2X4 nailed over existing shingles used roofing cement to plug the holes. Lift the course, plug the hole, lower the course press it in then plug the outer hole. An older version is to slide a strip of copper coated with roofing cement between the courses and press that in. An earlier form was to coat the copper then apply a layer of asphalt based roofing fabric over the copper then hit it with roofing cement. The best way is to leave that course out till you're done and destaging to apply the course.

Most roofing equipment today isn't geared for steep pitched roofs, steeples or mansards, Like you one has to construct platforms to create level areas for materials and rest spots. I still have a couple adjustable pipe stage roofing platforms I used once in the late 90s to set pipe stage on a lower roof to stage up to a higher gable so I could remove the old molding, sidewall and replicate the molding to replace.

Older steeplejacks used bosun's chairs to work the roof today it's rappelling gear, as long as you can still get up to the eye and hook in.

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post #16 of 17 Old 08-08-2015, 11:25 AM
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The first few roofs I learned on the boss wanted it done this way.The best way to go if you must but a real PITA if it's hot out.
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post #17 of 17 Old 08-08-2015, 12:08 PM Thread Starter
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The first few roofs I learned on the boss wanted it done this way.The best way to go if you must but a real PITA if it's hot out.
You got that right. I'm remodeling my house right now and have taken the roof off framing and all and the new roof going back is going to have to wait until winter. Right now it's just felt paper.
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