Stair tread overhang? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By Pineknot_86
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 8 Old 07-16-2019, 03:46 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Pineknot_86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 1,756
View Pineknot_86's Photo Album My Photos
Question Stair tread overhang?

The wife googled this and found the overhang to be from one inch to 1-3/4 inch. I want to have some but don't want to have too much as we don't want to trip and take weeks to mend. Your experience and/or recommendation is most appreciated. Be glad when this is all done. One fly in the ointment is the upper set of steps are different lengths, pushing the sheetrock out about 1/4 inch in a couple of places. This will be a challenge to trim the wall.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
Pineknot_86 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 Old 07-16-2019, 04:20 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,475
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
I remembered 1/14" max......

Turns out I was correct:


Tread widths have changed/increased:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 07-16-2019 at 04:22 PM.
woodnthings is offline  
post #3 of 8 Old 07-16-2019, 05:10 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,989
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Most building codes call for the nosing to be from 3/4" to 1 1/2". You might see what it is in your area.
Steve Neul is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 8 Old 07-16-2019, 06:56 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Pineknot_86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 1,756
View Pineknot_86's Photo Album My Photos
I'll check but this house was built in the late 60s or early 70s. It is a subdivision house that was put up quick like a bunny rabbit and the crew moved on to the next one. I really doubt is there was a code at the time. If so, it had a lot of leeway. My brother-in-law is in a new house; might go by and look at their stairway. Thanks.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
Pineknot_86 is offline  
post #5 of 8 Old 07-16-2019, 08:14 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,989
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pineknot_86 View Post
I'll check but this house was built in the late 60s or early 70s. It is a subdivision house that was put up quick like a bunny rabbit and the crew moved on to the next one. I really doubt is there was a code at the time. If so, it had a lot of leeway. My brother-in-law is in a new house; might go by and look at their stairway. Thanks.
I'm sure if it is anywhere in the normal range nobody is going to make you change it. It's not like a building inspector is going to measure it and tell you the stairs have to go. Now if it was hanging over a couple of inches or more where you didn't have to measure it to tell it was wrong that would be another story.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #6 of 8 Old 07-16-2019, 08:46 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,475
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Are you building these stairs?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pineknot_86 View Post
The wife googled this and found the overhang to be from one inch to 1-3/4 inch. I want to have some but don't want to have too much as we don't want to trip and take weeks to mend. Your experience and/or recommendation is most appreciated. Be glad when this is all done. One fly in the ointment is the upper set of steps are different lengths, pushing the sheetrock out about 1/4 inch in a couple of places. This will be a challenge to trim the wall.

Sounds like you are installing/building these? Which is why you are asking?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
I'm sure if it is anywhere in the normal range nobody is going to make you change it. It's not like a building inspector is going to measure it and tell you the stairs have to go. Now if it was hanging over a couple of inches or more where you didn't have to measure it to tell it was wrong that would be another story.

There's a safety concern for excessive overhang, one being possible breakage from too long of an extension, so more leverage out at the end. The second being a trip hazard, when you are going up if your toe catches under the nose and you fall up the steps, loose you balance and then fall backwards down the steps. It's best to stay at or under the latest code if you are building them. Additionally, round over the edges if you have bare wood, even with carpet it will lay over better.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 07-16-2019 at 08:49 PM.
woodnthings is offline  
post #7 of 8 Old 07-16-2019, 08:54 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,989
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Sounds like you are installing/building these? Which is why you are asking?





There's a safety concern for excessive overhang, one being possible breakage from too long of an extension, so more leverage out at the end. The second being a trip hazard, when you are going up if your toe catches under the nose and you fall up the steps, loose you balance and then fall backwards down the steps. It's best to stay at or under the latest code if you are building them. Additionally, round over the edges if you have bare wood, even with carpet it will lay over better.
Anywhere between 3/4" to 1 1/2" would be in the normal range and within code in most places. Some people like to put a piece of trim under the tread at the top of the riser and would need a little additional space for that purpose. The treads should be one piece but an edge could be glued on which wouldn't break off with no more overhang that that.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #8 of 8 Old 07-17-2019, 09:16 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Pineknot_86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 1,756
View Pineknot_86's Photo Album My Photos
No inspection needed. woodnthings addressed some good points and thanks for them. The treads are oak and one piece with a bull nose. We were using a scrap from one when we cut to length. There will be a 1/4 inch riser. We decided to measure each step as they are all different depths (and lengths- quality crafting?). Measure the depth, add 1/4 inch and the overhang. Rip and finish. The next thing is how to trim the side on the upper set of six steps. Searched and found a gazillion photos of stair trim.
woodnthings likes this.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
Pineknot_86 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome