Splined Miter Jig - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 2Likes
  • 1 Post By FrankC
  • 1 Post By plywoodworking
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 20 Old 02-12-2020, 01:23 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
plywoodworking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: indonesia
Posts: 33
View plywoodworking's Photo Album My Photos
Splined Miter Jig

I try make adjustable jig for table saw, can use for any jig combine with T slot. i build from HMR coz this material super flat, solid and very durable (waterprof). This jig can combine with many jig, now i make spline jig, not only that can use for feather board for safety cut without kickback, bevel cut, tenon ,mortise joint and etc.
i think this jig can upgrade with another function in future coz all adjustable.

this is first time i make spline cut, i really like the result

tutorial video
plywoodworking is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 20 Old 02-12-2020, 06:17 AM
Senior Member
 
ducbsa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Virginia
Posts: 386
View ducbsa's Photo Album My Photos
Very classy thin rip jig at 12:00 or so!
ducbsa is offline  
post #3 of 20 Old 02-12-2020, 08:28 AM
johnep
 
johnep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: East Anglia UK
Posts: 1,928
View johnep's Photo Album My Photos
I am envious of all the equipment used!
johnep
johnep is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 20 Old 02-12-2020, 10:11 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
plywoodworking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: indonesia
Posts: 33
View plywoodworking's Photo Album My Photos
thank you!!
i really like my thin rip jig, really work and very useful
plywoodworking is offline  
post #5 of 20 Old 02-12-2020, 10:17 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
plywoodworking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: indonesia
Posts: 33
View plywoodworking's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnep View Post
I am envious of all the equipment used!
johnep
i only use cheap tools but i upgrade my powertools, like my miter saw and table saw that cheap
first buy all not precision but i modification that tools make more comfort, precison and useful
plywoodworking is offline  
post #6 of 20 Old 02-12-2020, 04:16 PM
johnep
 
johnep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: East Anglia UK
Posts: 1,928
View johnep's Photo Album My Photos
Well I don't have a TS, miter saw or router. No room for these and I only do a little woodwork now.
Congratulations on what you have achieved.
johnep
johnep is offline  
post #7 of 20 Old 02-13-2020, 01:47 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
plywoodworking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: indonesia
Posts: 33
View plywoodworking's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnep View Post
Well I don't have a TS, miter saw or router. No room for these and I only do a little woodwork now.
Congratulations on what you have achieved.
johnep
thank you.
you have enough room for workshop, almost all hand tools?
i really love if woodworker work with hand tools coz i cant use that
plywoodworking is offline  
post #8 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 06:07 AM
johnep
 
johnep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: East Anglia UK
Posts: 1,928
View johnep's Photo Album My Photos
In UK land very expensive so houses built on small plots. Double garages are rare. We do not even have a garage at moment and no space to build one. Just a carport.
In USA it seems that double and triple garages are the norm.
All I have to work on is a B&B work folding workbench.
We have had posters in past who had to work in their lounge.
johnep
johnep is offline  
post #9 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 01:17 PM
Senior Member
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Murfreesboro, Tn.
Posts: 1,153
View hawkeye10's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by plywoodworking View Post
I try make adjustable jig for table saw, can use for any jig combine with T slot. i build from HMR coz this material super flat, solid and very durable (waterprof). This jig can combine with many jig, now i make spline jig, not only that can use for feather board for safety cut without kickback, bevel cut, tenon ,mortise joint and etc.
i think this jig can upgrade with another function in future coz all adjustable.

this is first time i make spline cut, i really like the result

tutorial video
https://youtu.be/yvZh9JEqfRk
Very nice work you do. I am glad you let us see what you do. What is your first name? My first name is Don. Please make more videos they are nice to watch. I have a question, what does is HMR?

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
hawkeye10 is offline  
post #10 of 20 Old 02-14-2020, 03:05 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,486
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
HMR = High Moisture Resistant particleboard.
hawkeye10 likes this.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
http://woodworkerglossary.com
FrankC is online now  
post #11 of 20 Old 02-15-2020, 05:16 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
plywoodworking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: indonesia
Posts: 33
View plywoodworking's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkeye10 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by plywoodworking View Post
I try make adjustable jig for table saw, can use for any jig combine with T slot. i build from HMR coz this material super flat, solid and very durable (waterprof). This jig can combine with many jig, now i make spline jig, not only that can use for feather board for safety cut without kickback, bevel cut, tenon ,mortise joint and etc.
i think this jig can upgrade with another function in future coz all adjustable.

this is first time i make spline cut, i really like the result

tutorial video
https://youtu.be/yvZh9JEqfRk
Very nice work you do. I am glad you let us see what you do. What is your first name? My first name is Don. Please make more videos they are nice to watch. I have a question, what does is HMR?
Thank you, hope can give inspired.
My first name edi but my friend call me did.
I always make video every week sometime if have time i share with free plan for download.
HMR look like MDF this is new material more solid like HDF but water resistant (this is particel board from wood + glue + resin/epoxy)
Maybe have different name in other country i know same like this with different name "valchromat" that material fire resistant
plywoodworking is offline  
post #12 of 20 Old 02-15-2020, 05:18 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
plywoodworking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: indonesia
Posts: 33
View plywoodworking's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
HMR = High Moisture Resistant particleboard.
Yes 100% right, in my country this is new material they call the next MDF coz more durable, flat, solid and water resistant
plywoodworking is offline  
post #13 of 20 Old 02-15-2020, 01:51 PM
CharleyL
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Central North Carolina
Posts: 183
View CharleyL's Photo Album My Photos
Why go to all this trouble to even build this jig?

After mitering the ends of my pieces, I set up my saw for 45 degree cuts and position my fence with a stop on it so that the blade will cut the slot in the work piece at 90 degrees to the 45 degree cut end of the work piece, and in the correct position. I then clamp my work piece to my miter gauge with the work piece against a stop block clamped on the fence, and then push the work piece and miter gauge forward through the cut. When the work piece reaches the blade, there is a gap between it and the fence, so no chance of it binding and kicking back. This is way more accurate than a jig of that design. I've been doing it this way to insert cross grained splines in my boxes for 30 years or more, and have had others propose, and then try to get me to use their version of this jig. I have even tried a few of their jigs, and I can do it without the jig and do it faster and more accurate using my way.

Charley
CharleyL is offline  
post #14 of 20 Old 02-15-2020, 11:45 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 15
View woodshed's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
Why go to all this trouble to even build this jig?

After mitering the ends of my pieces, I set up my saw for 45 degree cuts and position my fence with a stop on it so that the blade will cut the slot in the work piece at 90 degrees to the 45 degree cut end of the work piece, and in the correct position. I then clamp my work piece to my miter gauge with the work piece against a stop block clamped on the fence, and then push the work piece and miter gauge forward through the cut. When the work piece reaches the blade, there is a gap between it and the fence, so no chance of it binding and kicking back. This is way more accurate than a jig of that design. I've been doing it this way to insert cross grained splines in my boxes for 30 years or more, and have had others propose, and then try to get me to use their version of this jig. I have even tried a few of their jigs, and I can do it without the jig and do it faster and more accurate using my way.

Charley
Can you make a photo? It is hard to imagine your words in my head.
woodshed is offline  
post #15 of 20 Old 02-16-2020, 12:49 PM
CharleyL
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Central North Carolina
Posts: 183
View CharleyL's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodshed View Post
Can you make a photo? It is hard to imagine your words in my head.
I wish I could. At this time I have a foot injury that is keeping me from moving around and my shop is a hundred feet from the house.

Let me try to explain a different way.
If you angle your table saw blade to 45 degrees and then cut both ends of each side for the box that you will be building, so then each of your box side pieces will have angled cuts on each end, making the outside (top) of each piece longer than the inside (bottom). like this
___________
\ _________ / .

Now you need to make your spline cut in each of the ends. If your saw is a right tilt the blade is already angled 45 degrees to the right. Lay the work piece flat on the table with it's shorter side down (like in the diagram above) and move your fence so that it is almost above the blade with the blade angling out from under it to the right. Now clamp a short block of wood to the right side of your fence to act as a stop for your work. It needs to be short enough not to reach the blade but can be tall enough to allow it to be clamped to the fence with the clamp high enough for your work piece to pass under the clamp.

Now place your first box side on the saw table on the right side of the fence, laying flat (as shown in the diagram above), with it's sharp edge touching the block of wood that's clamped to the fence.

Move the fence to the left until the saw blade is aligned to cut your spline slot in the correct place on the end of your box side, and set the blade height to cut the spline depth desired.

Now, using your miter gauge to feed your work piece, place it in the right miter slot, and clamp your box side (still oriented as above) to the face of your miter gauge, with it's sharp left end still against the stop block on the fence, and push the miter gauge forward to make your spline cut.

If you have done this correctly, you will have a spline cut in the mitered end of your box side that is at right angle to the mitered end and is the depth desired for your spline.

Now you can repeat the process to each end of each of your box sides.


For splined box corners, you really need splines with the grain running across their narrow width, not with the grain running length wise. This is very important to achieve strength in the joint, but it can be difficult to make splines like this of the correct thickness and grain orientation. Splines with the grain running lengthwise will not add strength to your corner joint.

For making cross grained splines the exact thickness needed for the spline cuts, I found that using my table saw tenon jig let me get cross grained splines of the exact thickness needed very easily. I set the jig up much like I would to cut a tenon, but it's actually the thin waste piece that I use for the spline. I clamp a donor board standing up on end in the tenon jig and set the jig so the saw blade will leave the desired spline thickness off the left side of the board with the blade raised high enough that the resulting thin spline will be 2X the depth of the spline cut that was made in each end of the work pieces.

After the first cut, the donor board can then be flipped over and the cut repeated to make another spline. Then the donor board can be flipped end for end and two more splines can be cut on the other end of the donor board.

To cut the splines free of the donor board ends, I set my miter saw to 90 degrees and place a stop so that the desired spline width will be cut from the donor board. Then I can make the cut on each end of the donor board to yield 4 cross grained splines for my project.

I usually repeat the whole spline cutting process as many times as needed to make more than enough splines because they don't always end up being the exact thickness needed, and they will break easily because of the cross grain orientation.

If your spline isn't long enough, there is nothing wrong with using more than one spline end to end to get splines running the full length of your spline cuts. I do this frequently, ending up with spline pieces sticking out both ends of the spline joint during glue-up. They trim/break off easily after the glue is dry.

Sorry, I don't have any pictures of the "in process" spline work, but the attached photos do show cross grained spline joints in 6 "cat urn" boxes that I built out of mahogany several years ago using the methods described above.

Charley
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF0460.jpg
Views:	9
Size:	393.6 KB
ID:	384869  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF0474.jpg
Views:	9
Size:	477.2 KB
ID:	384871  

CharleyL is offline  
post #16 of 20 Old 02-16-2020, 01:26 PM
Senior Member
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Murfreesboro, Tn.
Posts: 1,153
View hawkeye10's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
I wish I could. At this time I have a foot injury that is keeping me from moving around and my shop is a hundred feet from the house.

Let me try to explain a different way.
If you angle your table saw blade to 45 degrees and then cut both ends of each side for the box that you will be building, so then each of your box side pieces will have angled cuts on each end, making the outside (top) of each piece longer than the inside (bottom). like this
___________
\ _________ / .

Now you need to make your spline cut in each of the ends. If your saw is a right tilt the blade is already angled 45 degrees to the right. Lay the work piece flat on the table with it's shorter side down (like in the diagram above) and move your fence so that it is almost above the blade with the blade angling out from under it to the right. Now clamp a short block of wood to the right side of your fence to act as a stop for your work. It needs to be short enough not to reach the blade but can be tall enough to allow it to be clamped to the fence with the clamp high enough for your work piece to pass under the clamp.

Now place your first box side on the saw table on the right side of the fence, laying flat (as shown in the diagram above), with it's sharp edge touching the block of wood that's clamped to the fence.

Move the fence to the left until the saw blade is aligned to cut your spline slot in the correct place on the end of your box side, and set the blade height to cut the spline depth desired.

Now, using your miter gauge to feed your work piece, place it in the right miter slot, and clamp your box side (still oriented as above) to the face of your miter gauge, with it's sharp left end still against the stop block on the fence, and push the miter gauge forward to make your spline cut.

If you have done this correctly, you will have a spline cut in the mitered end of your box side that is at right angle to the mitered end and is the depth desired for your spline.

Now you can repeat the process to each end of each of your box sides.


For splined box corners, you really need splines with the grain running across their narrow width, not with the grain running length wise. This is very important to achieve strength in the joint, but it can be difficult to make splines like this of the correct thickness and grain orientation. Splines with the grain running lengthwise will not add strength to your corner joint.

For making cross grained splines the exact thickness needed for the spline cuts, I found that using my table saw tenon jig let me get cross grained splines of the exact thickness needed very easily. I set the jig up much like I would to cut a tenon, but it's actually the thin waste piece that I use for the spline. I clamp a donor board standing up on end in the tenon jig and set the jig so the saw blade will leave the desired spline thickness off the left side of the board with the blade raised high enough that the resulting thin spline will be 2X the depth of the spline cut that was made in each end of the work pieces.

After the first cut, the donor board can then be flipped over and the cut repeated to make another spline. Then the donor board can be flipped end for end and two more splines can be cut on the other end of the donor board.

To cut the splines free of the donor board ends, I set my miter saw to 90 degrees and place a stop so that the desired spline width will be cut from the donor board. Then I can make the cut on each end of the donor board to yield 4 cross grained splines for my project.

I usually repeat the whole spline cutting process as many times as needed to make more than enough splines because they don't always end up being the exact thickness needed, and they will break easily because of the cross grain orientation.

If your spline isn't long enough, there is nothing wrong with using more than one spline end to end to get splines running the full length of your spline cuts. I do this frequently, ending up with spline pieces sticking out both ends of the spline joint during glue-up. They trim/break off easily after the glue is dry.

Sorry, I don't have any pictures of the "in process" spline work, but the attached photos do show cross grained spline joints in 6 "cat urn" boxes that I built out of mahogany several years ago using the methods described above.

Charley
Charley, you need to change your screen name to "Mr. Box". You are all-time making nice boxes. It's good to hear from you, it's been a while.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
hawkeye10 is offline  
post #17 of 20 Old 02-16-2020, 01:44 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,486
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
The one-upmanship around here gets really tiresome, when a member goes to the trouble to make a detailed video of how he does something he does not deserve to be told his idea is not worth the bother. Particularly when the alternative offered only does half the job.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
http://woodworkerglossary.com
FrankC is online now  
post #18 of 20 Old 02-16-2020, 02:47 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
plywoodworking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: indonesia
Posts: 33
View plywoodworking's Photo Album My Photos
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
The one-upmanship around here gets really tiresome, when a member goes to the trouble to make a detailed video of how he does something he does not deserve to be told his idea is not worth the bother. Particularly when the alternative offered only does half the job.
for me it's okay no problem if someone have some idea more simple and effective. i really appreciated, but i still confuse about the explain how this work coz only use text without photo step by step. i know he expert make splined without jig really good job.

thank you for give new idea and suggestion
JamesTinKS likes this.
plywoodworking is offline  
post #19 of 20 Old 02-16-2020, 07:04 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 15
View woodshed's Photo Album My Photos
The second description from Charlie made it more easy to understand. Now I get what he means. Thank you.

Also thank you for the extra details about the grain direction for the splines and how you glue more than one spline piece which would be just as strong but not seeable on the outside. I would not think of that.

Those are very impressive boxes.
woodshed is offline  
post #20 of 20 Old 02-17-2020, 09:59 AM
CharleyL
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Central North Carolina
Posts: 183
View CharleyL's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodshed View Post
The second description from Charlie made it more easy to understand. Now I get what he means. Thank you.

Also thank you for the extra details about the grain direction for the splines and how you glue more than one spline piece which would be just as strong but not seeable on the outside. I would not think of that.

Those are very impressive boxes.

Thanks Hawkeye10 and Woodshed. It's appreciated.

If there are still some questions, I'll try to take some photos when my foot is healed enough for me to get to my shop, but it will likely be a week or more before I can do this.

Charley
CharleyL is offline  
Reply

Tags
jigs, spline jigs, table saw, table saw jigs

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome