Speaking Of Jointing - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 06:01 PM Thread Starter
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Speaking Of Jointing

How would you do the edge...

The wood...Hondouras Mahogany

The length...18'

The width...20"

The thickness...12/4





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post #2 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 06:07 PM
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One piece or with a field joint?
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post #3 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 06:19 PM
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Is this a trick question? Lol

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post #4 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 06:26 PM Thread Starter
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It's not a trick question. They (3) are solid lumber.





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post #5 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 06:32 PM
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Hand held router, straight edge attached to top surface and a top and bottom bearing flush trim bit (2" or better cut length).
Make first pass with top bearing riding on the straight edge, flip stock over, make second pass with bottom bearing on the freshly routed surface.

John

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post #6 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 06:45 PM
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Get a really long jointer. Lol

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post #7 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 07:00 PM
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Sounds like awesome boards!

If you are jointing the edge for glue-up you might just do it by hand. Joint them together with a #7 or #8 and you have mating edges. For the length has anyone tried a laser level just to gauge it?

If you decide to give up you can send them my way. I'll make sure they are disposed of properly. :-)
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post #8 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 07:22 PM
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I'd do em by hand as well but with a No 8 as it's wide enough to take a full width cut.

Or I might flip a cooper's jointer over and use it like a massive bench jointer.

As for the immense size/length, it would be tough to manage but doable. I have jointed 12' and 14' stock by hand with little trouble but they were not 12/4!

I'm guessing this question is leading to some "tada" or "ah ha!" so what gives, Mike?
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post #9 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 07:26 PM
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By hand. Every time. I would get them close with whatever power tool you choose, then grab the number 8.
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post #10 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 07:37 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firemedic View Post

I'm guessing this question is leading to some "tada" or "ah ha!" so what gives, Mike?
Nothing gives...it's a legitimate question. Some working stock has to be ordered large/thick to get what is needed. The percentage of overage needed to figure a job may not cover it. Having all like stock sure beats ordering more material that may look entirely different.




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post #11 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 09:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman

Nothing gives...it's a legitimate question. Some working stock has to be ordered large/thick to get what is needed. The percentage of overage needed to figure a job may not cover it. Having all like stock sure beats ordering more material that may look entirely different.




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Ahh ok... So this ain't a table top then? lol

I'd also, obviously, cut the pieces to rough size prior to jointing...
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post #12 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 09:17 PM
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I think I'd make a long sled and securely clamp it to that, then make a pass or two at the table saw so I knew I had a straight edge before doing anything with planes or jointers. Once I had a good edge, then I'd use either method suggested, either a plane or a jointer.

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post #13 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 10:21 PM
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Warner Construction...?

send 'em over to Warner Construction. He likes big stuff and has a big jointer. I think it's about 12 ft long....

I think this was mentioned before and you used supports and a helper if I recall? Maybe you did it solo, but that's way too impressive.

I would probably go with jschaben's idea using the router and straight edge and flip it over and use the previous routered surface for the final.

Unless this is for a executive's corporate meeting table it's hard to imagine a need for such pieces.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 06-08-2012 at 12:48 AM.
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post #14 of 32 Old 06-07-2012, 11:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jschaben View Post
Hand held router, straight edge attached to top surface and a top and bottom bearing flush trim bit (2" or better cut length).
Make first pass with top bearing riding on the straight edge, flip stock over, make second pass with bottom bearing on the freshly routed surface.

Just reread this, probably won't work as written. Tip mounted bearing would need to be removed for the first pass or it would take control. Two bits and/or two routers would be nice.

John

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post #15 of 32 Old 06-08-2012, 08:24 AM
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Where are you getting them from? For the purposes of saving your back and time maybe just pay to have them joint one edge and rip them to size. That's a lot of wood to wrestle. Got helpers? IF I had that in my garage I'd have to use a handplane as that's what I have. That's what I prefer.
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post #16 of 32 Old 06-08-2012, 09:27 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Where are you getting them from? For the purposes of saving your back and time maybe just pay to have them joint one edge and rip them to size. That's a lot of wood to wrestle. Got helpers? IF I had that in my garage I'd have to use a handplane as that's what I have. That's what I prefer.

I needed 12/4 stock and one of my local suppliers located a distributor out of state, that had three that size that were supposed to be S2S. I thought I could get away with just two, but since they were the same stock and their yield would all look very similar, I thought...why not. I can always use Mahogany.

As for cutting to size first, that would have been a start, but I did not have a good edge to start with. This lumber was for one of the Mahogany bars I' have posted in the past. It was also for some dining room cabinetry and crown moulding to include a tray ceiling.

I needed to first rip some long lengths to resaw for crown and other moulding.





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post #17 of 32 Old 06-08-2012, 01:04 PM
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What about a lumber mill with a straight line rip saw? They might be able to help for cheap.
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post #18 of 32 Old 06-08-2012, 07:16 PM
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1. Get a 1/2" end mill and chuck it in a 1/2" router. Make sure the cutting length is longer than stock thickness.

2. Attach some plywood cleats to the two pieces to be joined. Space the two pieces 7/16" or a little less apart and secure with the cleats (one side).

3. Tack a straight edge along the gap for the router to guide on.

4. Run the router down the gap.

This will remove a very minimum of the stock, and any variation in the straight edge wont matter, as the gap will be exactly 1/2" across at any point. Make sure to put witness marks every so often so that when the cleats are removed, the two pieces come together in the same position as when trimmed.
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post #19 of 32 Old 06-08-2012, 07:50 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alchymist View Post
1. Get a 1/2" end mill and chuck it in a 1/2" router. Make sure the cutting length is longer than stock thickness.

2. Attach some plywood cleats to the two pieces to be joined. Space the two pieces 7/16" or a little less apart and secure with the cleats (one side).

3. Tack a straight edge along the gap for the router to guide on.

4. Run the router down the gap.

This will remove a very minimum of the stock, and any variation in the straight edge wont matter, as the gap will be exactly 1/2" across at any point. Make sure to put witness marks every so often so that when the cleats are removed, the two pieces come together in the same position as when trimmed.
This is about straight edging one edge.





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post #20 of 32 Old 06-08-2012, 09:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
This is about straight edging one edge.

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Gotcha - thought you were doing a glueup. So, skip steps 2 & 4, run the router along the straight edge taking off a 1/16' or so. Will be a straight as your straightedge.
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