Small square recommendation - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 7Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 36 Old 03-07-2019, 05:19 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 168
View dws780's Photo Album My Photos
Small square recommendation

In the market for a 6Ē or 8Ē steel square.

Since I canít justify paying for a woodpecker I was looking at the Empire one at Home Depot. Is it any good? I know it wonít be as good as woodpecker.
Any recommendations on other brands?


True Blue Heavy-Duty Square

https://www.homedepot.com/p/202035308


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
dws780 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 36 Old 03-07-2019, 06:49 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 4,847
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
Any square is as good as it is accurate, buy it in person and check it at the store.
John Smith_inFL likes this.

ďEverything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.Ē
― Marcus Aurelius
FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
FrankC is online now  
post #3 of 36 Old 03-07-2019, 07:00 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,465
View Quickstep's Photo Album My Photos
I just got this one from Amazon. Itís not quite a bargain, but itís square. One thing I like about it a little better than the Woodpeckers square is that the blade is relatively thin, so transferring measurements is a little easier.

https://www.amazon.com/Woodraphic-Gu...gateway&sr=8-3



I had a really nice try square made by Johnson that had a mahogany handle and a stainless steel blade. I dropped it and it went out of square and thereís no way to put it back, but I really liked that square.

Last edited by Quickstep; 03-07-2019 at 07:04 PM.
Quickstep is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 12:07 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 168
View dws780's Photo Album My Photos
That looks like a woodpecker clone in black :)

It is a lot cheaper then woodpecker but mixed review.

Anyone else want to share their square with me? :)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
dws780 is offline  
post #5 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 08:10 AM
Central Florida
 
John Smith_inFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 520
View John Smith_inFL's Photo Album My Photos
a square (or any tool) is only as accurate as the person using it
to perform the task for which it was designed for.

i.e.: marking perfectly square lines on a piece of wood . . . . .
then, the "craftsman" can't follow a straight line with a saw.
or: checking for square in a build, only to find it was not built
square to begin with.
even Harbor Freight carries "accurate" squares - if you calibrate them yourself.
so many people overthink the tools - compared to their skill set.

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --
John Smith_inFL is offline  
post #6 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 08:11 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,465
View Quickstep's Photo Album My Photos
“That looks like a woodpecker clone in black 🙂
It is a lot cheaper then woodpecker but mixed review.”

There are some differences in the black square for good or bad.

The Woodpeckers square is machined from a single piece whereas the black square is three pieces, allowing it to be adjusted if it goes out of square. Since the Woodpecker square is machined from a single piece, it’s less likely to go out of square. Also, the blade is thinner on the black square which I like, I only wish the blade was stainless.
Quickstep is offline  
post #7 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 10:13 AM
1948
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Dutchess County, NY
Posts: 449
View Packard's Photo Album My Photos
I got one of these Shinwa squares (plastic). The aluminum ones are just $2.00 more and I should have bought that.

It is accurate and super-handy. But small. And $16.00 seems high. And the markings are in mm, not inches.

But I would buy it again as it is so handy.

https://www.amazon.com/Shinwa-Japane.../dp/B00GVBMCLC
Packard is offline  
post #8 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 12:11 PM
Senior Member
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Dickinson, Tx. / Denison, TX
Posts: 3,020
View Tony B's Photo Album My Photos
Every 'machinist' or 'engineers square' I have ever had was extremely accurate. Also, plastic drafting triangles are extremely accurate. No matter where you go, it's quick and easy to verify if they are 'true'. Simply lay your square/triangle against one edge of a piece of paper and draw a line vertical (90*). Then flip the square over so that the base is at the opposite direction. Now slide it over to your drawn line and it should line up 100%.
DesertRatTom likes this.

Tony B



Retired woodworker, amongst other things, Sold full time cruising boat and now full time cruising in RV. Currently in Denison, Tx
Tony B is offline  
post #9 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 12:42 PM
Senior Member
 
Pineknot_86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 1,662
View Pineknot_86's Photo Album My Photos
Four inch Groz square from Woodcraft. They have three sizes- can get all three in a pack.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
Pineknot_86 is offline  
post #10 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 12:48 PM
1948
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Dutchess County, NY
Posts: 449
View Packard's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
Every 'machinist' or 'engineers square' I have ever had was extremely accurate. Also, plastic drafting triangles are extremely accurate. No matter where you go, it's quick and easy to verify if they are 'true'. Simply lay your square/triangle against one edge of a piece of paper and draw a line vertical (90*). Then flip the square over so that the base is at the opposite direction. Now slide it over to your drawn line and it should line up 100%.
It costs exactly the same amount of money to mold an accurate square from plastic as it would cost to mold an inaccurate one. The cost is in the mold making. But with CNC milling machines I expect that almost all plastic squares are pretty accuarate. And they don't get out of accurate due to drops or mishandling.

The same can not be said for assembled squares. With an assembled square the machining has to be precise and the assembly has to be precise. Both of which add cost. So a Starrett adjustable square (which is pretty accurate) is going to cost a good deal more than a $10.00 Swanson square or a $8.00 Pittsburgh square (from Harbor Freight).

I paid over $100.00 for my Starrett several years back. It remains accurate.
Packard is offline  
post #11 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 01:16 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,149
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
A square only needs to be square ......

If it checks out, the cost or means of manufacturing is irrelevant. I have all sorts of squares, Stanley, Starrett, Irwin and Harbor Fright
https://www.harborfreight.com/l-squa...-pc-63033.html



For woodworking the tolerances are not established numerically, it just needs to fit well and look good. Glue lines are not always hidden as in a mortise and tenon, so they may show or not. A small square will only be used within it's length, so .001" accuracy per foot isn't needed. All the measuring instruments I've purchased from Harbor Fright have been reliable including digital calipers.
GeorgeC likes this.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 03-08-2019 at 03:17 PM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #12 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 01:51 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 1,472
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
As others have pointed out, it is easy to test a square. If it square, it is square, and then the only other considerations would be:

* Cost.
* Utility to purpose - Some squares are more suitable for some uses than others.
* Styling or fashion - does it look good or feel good in the hand.

I have a bunch of squares of different types and sizes. I suspect it is true for most of the people here. For basic woodworking, I use the Starrett combination square the most.

I have a Sorby "Gilt Edge" 9 inch try square that was tossed in when I bought a used bandsaw. Besides being perfectly square, it is a work of art. The brass, wood, and blued steel give heft and feel good in the hand to use. Working with it feels better than the combination square, although I can't really explain why. Perhaps it is the wider blade.

I would love to have a 6 inch try square just like it, and maybe I'll find one lost in a bin somewhere. Do I really need a try square, when the Starrett combination square will do just fine? No. Do I enjoy using it? Yes.

Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 03-08-2019 at 01:53 PM.
Tool Agnostic is offline  
post #13 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 01:56 PM
djg
Senior Something
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1,019
View djg's Photo Album My Photos
I bought my machinist squares from Enco, now MCLS I believe, and they were reasonable. Came with a guarantee of accuracy if you can believe that. May be overkill for woodworking as stated above.
djg is offline  
post #14 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 02:32 PM
1948
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Dutchess County, NY
Posts: 449
View Packard's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
As others have pointed out, it is easy to test a square. If it square, it is square,...
That holds true to one-piece units. The others, especially the ones that have sliding components, could start out being square and lose its squareness over time.

So they need to be checked periodically.

But for most wood working it is not essential. The notable exceptions are squareness on a saw blade for glue line. And even that is not a problem if you use one side of the blade for one piece and the other side of the blade for the adjoining piece. Even if it were off by 2 degrees, the glue line would be perfect.

I also agree, it feels good in the hand using quality tools. It puts me in a frame of mind to do careful work.
Packard is offline  
post #15 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 02:43 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 168
View dws780's Photo Album My Photos
I think Iím going to try out a few cheaper square first before jumping into higher end brand like woodpecker.

Most of the woodworkers I follow on YouTube and Instagram uses Woodpecker so I just want to see whatís they hype about.

I love tools but just canít afford all the nice ones lol


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
dws780 is offline  
post #16 of 36 Old 03-08-2019, 03:10 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: jesup GA
Posts: 379
View Mikhail2400's Photo Album My Photos
I bought this 4 piece set of machinists squares from Grizzly and I love them. Use them every time im in the shop and if they are out any I havnt discovered it. Best part is the price.
https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...uare-Set/H2993

Mike
Everything i build comes with a redneck warranty. If it breaks you get to keep both pieces.
Mikhail2400 is offline  
post #17 of 36 Old 03-09-2019, 07:43 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,532
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
a square (or any tool) is only as accurate as the person using it
to perform the task for which it was designed for.

i.e.: marking perfectly square lines on a piece of wood . . . . .
then, the "craftsman" can't follow a straight line with a saw.
or: checking for square in a build, only to find it was not built
square to begin with.
even Harbor Freight carries "accurate" squares - if you calibrate them yourself.
so many people overthink the tools - compared to their skill set.

.

.

Amen, brother Amem. This is especially true in woodworking where workers think they are in a high end machine shop.


George
Jay C. White Cloud likes this.
GeorgeC is offline  
post #18 of 36 Old 03-09-2019, 07:47 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,532
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by dws780 View Post
I think Iím going to try out a few cheaper square first before jumping into higher end brand like woodpecker.

Most of the woodworkers I follow on YouTube and Instagram uses Woodpecker so I just want to see whatís they hype about.

I love tools but just canít afford all the nice ones lol


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I have been doing woodworking for 40 years and have never even heard of Woodpecker before this time. It sure must be up in the stratosphere somewhere.


George
Jay C. White Cloud likes this.
GeorgeC is offline  
post #19 of 36 Old 03-09-2019, 09:15 AM
Senior Member
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Murfreesboro, Tn.
Posts: 1,008
View hawkeye10's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by dws780 View Post
In the market for a 6” or 8” steel square.

Since I can’t justify paying for a woodpecker I was looking at the Empire one at Home Depot. Is it any good? I know it won’t be as good as woodpecker.
Any recommendations on other brands?


True Blue Heavy-Duty Square

https://www.homedepot.com/p/202035308


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

There is more to a square than being square. I like a square that moves across the blade very smooth, and I like one that the body is an inch wide and the blade is 3/4 inch wide. I also like it to lock and unlock easy. Here is a 4" and a 6" that I have.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Blem-Cosmet....c100005.m1851

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Blem-Cosmet....c100005.m1851

I use the 4" square most of the time because it fits in my apron's pocket.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.

Last edited by hawkeye10; 03-09-2019 at 09:18 AM.
hawkeye10 is offline  
post #20 of 36 Old 03-09-2019, 09:59 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 153
View Onefreetexan's Photo Album My Photos
I have several of that type of squares,, all over. 50 years old and still square, so easy to work with.
Onefreetexan is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Squaring table saw Pastorshobby Power Tools & Machinery 40 03-14-2018 01:32 PM
Off Square Nick W. Design & Plans 1 03-14-2018 11:08 AM
Carpenters square wayyyy off allpurpose Hand Tools 41 08-14-2016 08:31 PM
The square that may not be so square! bmarshall9686 General Woodworking Discussion 5 04-09-2016 01:05 PM
checking a square with a mirror t4d Hand Tools 12 12-01-2015 11:13 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome