Show us your shop! - Page 107 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 126Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #2121 of 2132 Old 01-21-2019, 09:23 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 41
View Dylan Buffum's Photo Album My Photos
More up-to-date photos of the shop.

Still working on improving the lighting. I have four LED spotlights which are adequate when properly arranged on the spot I'm working. But the general ambient light is not so great except with full daylight, so I'm going to install better fixtures above.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0136.jpg
Views:	103
Size:	215.9 KB
ID:	370767  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0134.jpg
Views:	100
Size:	337.6 KB
ID:	370769  

RogerC likes this.

Last edited by Dylan Buffum; 01-21-2019 at 09:49 AM.
Dylan Buffum is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2122 of 2132 Old 01-21-2019, 09:35 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 166
View RogerC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dylan Buffum View Post
More up-to-date photos of the shop.

Still working on improving the lighting. I have four LED spotlights which are adequate when properly arranged on the spot I'm working. But the general ambient light is not so great except with full daylight, so I'm going to install better fixtures above.
I've seen some of the largish industrial lights on our local CL in the materials section for cheap. Maybe look for some of those on your CL.
RogerC is offline  
post #2123 of 2132 Old 02-13-2019, 08:38 PM
EdS
Senior Member
 
EdS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Houston, Tx
Posts: 195
View EdS's Photo Album My Photos
I moved to Austin from Houston last year, wanted to be closer to my adult children. I had gotten by with a 2 car garage shop for most of my life, but finally had the chance to buy a bigger house, a 3 car garage, two bays of which will be dedicated shop space. No more moving tools around to get the car in. Most all of my power tools were lost in the Hurricane Harvey flood of my Houston garage, which had 5' of water in it. So along with the new shop, I replaced my table saw, got a new jointer/planer, got the band saw I had wanted for years, built a good solid bench/outfeed table, miter saw and stand. The drill press I was able to salvage from the flood after much rust removal. It belonged to my grandfather so, I was really happy to save it. The router table made it through the flood but none of my routers, drills, sanders etc could be saved. Anyway, all that is behind me now, I have a new shop and more space and storage than I know what to do with. Looking forward to years of enjoyment.













EdS is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2124 of 2132 Old 02-14-2019, 06:50 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: milwaukee, wi
Posts: 1,258
View sanchez's Photo Album My Photos
Dang Ed, nice space! Those Hammer tools look really nice!
sanchez is offline  
post #2125 of 2132 Old 02-14-2019, 07:15 PM
EdS
Senior Member
 
EdS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Houston, Tx
Posts: 195
View EdS's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks Sanchez, the sliding table saw is the model I had before the flood ruined it. I liked it so much I bought the same saw again. I'm 62 and have been woodworking as a hobby my whole life and never before had a proper jointer. I also lost a Dewalt 735 planer to the flood, so I thought it was a perfect excuse to get the jointer/planer combo. Both the saw and the J/P have a 4 hp motor. I built the bench when I moved in last spring. Its a torsion box on top made of 3/4" MDF. The base is just construction fir that I had lots of fun jointing and planing...I banded the torsion box with some hard maple for durability and used a piece of hardboard for the surface which is just tacked down with a few pin nails. That way if I spill something or cut into it, it's a cheap and easy replacement. Here are a couple shots of the drill press I was able to save. lots of elbow grease, but it was worth it. It's a 1941 Delta.


Last edited by EdS; 02-14-2019 at 07:35 PM.
EdS is offline  
post #2126 of 2132 Old 03-03-2019, 10:12 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 33
View Scott410's Photo Album My Photos
I need my garage to flood out. Your new shop will be amazing, it looks fantastic already.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
Scott410 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Scott410 For This Useful Post:
EdS (03-04-2019)
post #2127 of 2132 Old 03-04-2019, 07:17 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 41
View Dylan Buffum's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdS View Post
Here are a couple shots of the drill press I was able to save. lots of elbow grease, but it was worth it. It's a 1941 Delta.
Very cool. How do you know it's from 1941? I have the same press, but from a slightly different vintage. Rockwell bought Delta in 1945, and sold it in 1981, so mine is of that era. I inherited from my grandfather. He lived in Brooklyn, NY from the depression into the 1990's. I love how the retailer riveted a metal plaque onto the machine.

I confess I don't know how to use the press to its fullest extent. I know that if I move the belt to the larger pulley on the motor, and correspondingly smaller pulley on the other end, the bit will spin faster. I assume that means there will be less torque, and the bit will bog down more easily? But maybe it cuts cleaner at a higher speed?

Currently, I already have trouble with getting enough power to it. When I turn it on the lights flicker. I can bog it down really easily if I don't clear the bit frequently. I'm going to run a 20a circuit out to the shop, which will help. But more knowledge about how to best use the press might also.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	0722182021.jpg
Views:	29
Size:	309.1 KB
ID:	372569  

Click image for larger version

Name:	0722182022.jpg
Views:	28
Size:	262.6 KB
ID:	372571  

Click image for larger version

Name:	0722182026.jpg
Views:	24
Size:	298.6 KB
ID:	372573  


Last edited by Dylan Buffum; 03-04-2019 at 07:27 AM.
Dylan Buffum is offline  
post #2128 of 2132 Old 03-04-2019, 08:10 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 41
View Dylan Buffum's Photo Album My Photos
From this website, I've narrowed down the vintage to 1947-1953.

http://wiki.vintagemachinery.org/Del...alNumbers.ashx

Apparently, this style serial number plate was introduced in late 1947, and after 1953 these were manufactured in Pittsburgh not Milwaukee.

The serial number is odd, though. None of the other machines have one in a similar format.
Dylan Buffum is offline  
post #2129 of 2132 Old 03-04-2019, 12:18 PM
Junior Member
 
RickKr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: NE Oregon
Posts: 16
View RickKr's Photo Album My Photos
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by EdS View Post
I moved to Austin from Houston last year, wanted to be closer to my adult children. I had gotten by with a 2 car garage shop for most of my life, but finally had the chance to buy a bigger house, a 3 car garage, two bays of which will be dedicated shop space.
...snip...
I have a new shop and more space and storage than I know what to do with. Looking forward to years of enjoyment.
...snip...
Good on you for the move and the new shop. But... it looks like a museum There is not a single chip or speck of wood dust.

I recently moved also, to be near my granddaughter. I moved from a basement machine shop and a detached, single car garage as my woodworking "shop" (NOT). I now have a 2-car garage which is my machine shop and increasingly my woodworking shop. No consideration of trying to park my car in it anymore.

Rick
EdS likes this.

"If you want nice, clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes a bit cheaper."
RickKr is offline  
post #2130 of 2132 Old 03-04-2019, 10:24 PM
EdS
Senior Member
 
EdS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Houston, Tx
Posts: 195
View EdS's Photo Album My Photos
I did a similar search as you did found a site that matched the serial number to the year. My dad had told me that Grand Dad bought the press just before the war, so my guess is that the purchase was made before 12/7/41. I really had to work to restore this drill press. It took weeks of brushing and sanding. Thank God this is old cast iron and can take that kind of abuse. As you can probably see, the motor is not original, nor is the switch, both added be Grand Dad at some point. I spent the time on it not because its worth any amount of money, but just to honor my Grandad and my Father for passing it to me.
woodnthings likes this.
EdS is offline  
post #2131 of 2132 Old 03-05-2019, 06:38 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 41
View Dylan Buffum's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdS View Post
I did a similar search as you did found a site that matched the serial number to the year. My dad had told me that Grand Dad bought the press just before the war, so my guess is that the purchase was made before 12/7/41. I really had to work to restore this drill press. It took weeks of brushing and sanding. Thank God this is old cast iron and can take that kind of abuse. As you can probably see, the motor is not original, nor is the switch, both added be Grand Dad at some point. I spent the time on it not because its worth any amount of money, but just to honor my Grandad and my Father for passing it to me.
Love it. And now Iím inspired to do some clean up on mine, too.

My research yesterday showed that the motor was actually sold separately. So thereís really no such thing as an ďoriginalĒ motor. My motor is a delta of similar vintage, so it was probably bought at the same time and from the same place as the press.

Check out vintagemachinery.org They have a lot of information on these, and also downloadable PDFs of Delta manuals, catalogues and parts lists that cover this machine.
EdS likes this.
Dylan Buffum is offline  
post #2132 of 2132 Old 05-05-2019, 04:07 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 33
View Scott410's Photo Album My Photos
I recently sold a vehicle that has been sitting in my garage for 3 yrs so now I'm working on my garage.
This table has been sitting in a corner of my garage getting beat on for yrs, it came with the garage. Whoever built it did well, so I want to see what I can do with it.

1. The garage floor in very level so I'm going to put adjustable feet on it.
2. Build a new thicker top for it.
3. Refurbish the drawers and faces.
4. Sand and stain some cool colors.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
Scott410 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Scott410 For This Useful Post:
Bob in St. Louis (05-05-2019)
Reply

Tags
cabinet shop, shop, trailer shop

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Show me yer planes!!!! Corndog Hand Tools 116 01-02-2013 05:33 PM
Shop made hand planes (my shop) Daren Project Showcase 43 07-03-2011 01:55 PM
I'll Show You Mine-You Show Me Yours cabinetman Off Topic 5 07-27-2008 04:45 PM
woodworking show kenneth evans General Woodworking Discussion 0 02-10-2008 11:27 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome