Seeking 1/4" Handrail Router Bit - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 18 Old 08-04-2020, 05:57 PM Thread Starter
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Seeking 1/4" Handrail Router Bit

Recent join to the forum and to the world of woodworking... Most of my work has been rougher construction, DIY, etc. I'm currently in the process of rebuilding our front porch and need some assistance with the handrail. Specifically, I'm trying to locate a handrail router bit with a 1/4" shank. Are there any out there? My Milwaukee 27230-20 only takes 1/4".
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post #2 of 18 Old 08-04-2020, 06:13 PM
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yes, they are out there.
but ~ you may have to sacrifice a little if you have a
specific design or style you want.
large profile bits require several passes, taking off just a little at a time.
or else - something breaks and somebody gets hurt.
what type of wood will you be using for the hand rail ?
will you be using standard lumber like a P/T 2x4 ?
a cross section sketch of the profile would help.

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.

Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 08-04-2020 at 06:16 PM.
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post #3 of 18 Old 08-04-2020, 06:15 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Probably not going to find one

The amount of material needing removal to make a hand rail section is too much of a strain on the 1/4" dia shank.

https://www.google.com/search?q=hand...7UlIlOUvSxoK6M


It's possibly a router table operation because of the size of the cutter needed. This guy uses the router in the table mounting plate to stabilize the router on the workpiece:

https://youtu.be/58UwIYJ3bDM?t=139

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #4 of 18 Old 08-05-2020, 12:20 AM Thread Starter
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The design concept is fairly simple (see attached).

I'm following the model on baily line road. Multiple passes is not a problem. I'm using AC2 Pressure Treated Southern Yellow Pine as this is for our front porch. I'd prefer not to pick-up another router for this one project.

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post #5 of 18 Old 08-05-2020, 04:25 AM
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Is the Milwaukee 2723-20 router their cordless trim router?
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post #6 of 18 Old 08-05-2020, 06:41 AM
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sorry, Dog - but I don't see the railing profile example or the router photo.
Milwaukee 27230-20 doesn't bring up a particular model for me.
but - 2723-20 shows a trim router, like QuickStep suggests.

after seeing your railing sketch or drawing, we can probably come up
with a viable solution.
I was doing hand router projects for many years before I finally got into
the 1/2" shank routers. using a little forethought solves a lot of problems.

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.
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post #7 of 18 Old 08-05-2020, 10:14 AM Thread Starter
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Photos second attempt. Regarding my router, yes, it's the M18 FUEL™ Compact Router (https://www.milwaukeetool.com/Produc...outers/2723-20).

Note: I've started a search on Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace for a 1/2" router - should I have to go that route.
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post #8 of 18 Old 08-05-2020, 10:27 AM
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1/4 will work fine with the profiles shown there. A 1/4 round over and a fluting bit is all you need.

You may have to let your treated wood dry for a while before routing though, it will fuzz if wet. Also be aware that yellow pine may crook, warp, cup, crack and twist badly.

http://www.diychatroom.com/

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Anything is possible IF you don't know what you are talking about.

Last edited by BigJim; 08-06-2020 at 07:57 AM.
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post #9 of 18 Old 08-05-2020, 10:55 AM
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Go look at a wood hand rail .....

The sections you have made here are too tiny to be workable if you need to grab the hand rail for support! The cove needs to be larger and deeper and the roundover needs to be larger. This one won't work very well, and that's why I suggested a 1/2" bit above, larger in every way:




Some different handrail sections shown here, not the one featured however:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-05-2020 at 11:24 AM.
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post #10 of 18 Old 08-05-2020, 11:14 AM
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How about a cove bit. Make 2 passes. First pass with rail on one edge then flip over and make the second pass. You could even just do one pass. Cove bits are available in 1/4" shanks. Based on the wood you are using may want to sneak up on the final depth. My comment about multiple passes really meant multiple profiles....one with the rail facing up and one with the rail facing down.....do this on both sides of the rail.
There are building codes concerning hand rail dimensions that should be followed.

Last edited by JIMMIEM; 08-05-2020 at 11:24 AM. Reason: Add info
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post #11 of 18 Old 08-05-2020, 05:01 PM Thread Starter
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All, agreed that as is, this would not work for a solid railing. The final rail with start with a 3.5” w x 3” h glued stock – all within our city code. Specifically the aforementioned AC2 treated yellow pine (the previous railing was the same and held up OK. It’s currently sitting out in the yard drying out. This is just a prototype to see what I could do with what I have. Clearly not enough… The final rail with start with a 3.5” w x 3” h glued stock. I’d like the finger grooves to be larger, the round over wider and the groove edges smoother (rounded).

I have both CMT round over (838.254.11) and cove (837.350.11) bits but both have bearing guides. Not an issue for the round over but a problem for the cove. I was hoping to find a ¼” shank handrail bit, but as that is proving to be difficult to locate, my options are to either purchase a new ½” collet router or a ¼” cove bit without a bearing guide. Using a fluting bit is an interesting option though it doesn’t resolve the recess size issue – unless if I can a ¼” version tall (1/2”) and deep (1/2”) enough. Otherwise, using a sans bearing guide cove bit seems like the best option. Again, if I can find one.

Note: I found a new in box old stock Freud FT1700VCE router for $75. That and a 1/2” shank handrail bit, etc. might be the best option. Only bummer, it’s just the fixed base. Are there universal plunge bases available?

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post #12 of 18 Old 08-05-2020, 07:00 PM
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Plunge routing is a pretty specific operation......

I decent fixed base router is always a god addition to your router arsenal ..... you will end up having several. I have a few of the Freud plunge routers myself that I acquired when they were on sale for about $125.00 at Rockler or Woodcraft .... ?

Plunge routers make grooves and dados within the boundaries of the work piece. Fixed base routers make profiles along the outer edges of the workpiece. That's a simplification, but true more or less.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-05-2020 at 07:04 PM.
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post #13 of 18 Old 08-05-2020, 09:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bdogChicago View Post
Note: I've started a search on Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace for a 1/2" router - should I have to go that route.
If you get a 1/2 router, I don't think you'll be sorry.
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post #14 of 18 Old 08-06-2020, 01:10 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks. I purchased the Freud and placed an order for a CMT 856.702.11 Hand Rail Bit, 1-1/4-Inch Diameter, 1/2-Inch Shank and a CMT 856.601.11 Hand Rail Bit, 1/2-In Shank, 2-1/2-In Diam. Thanks for the advice!

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post #15 of 18 Old 08-06-2020, 07:15 AM
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you will be pleased with the 1/2" router.
but just remember the rule: the more power a tool has,
the faster and more worse you can get hurt.
learn how to use it safely and you will be okay.
(and yes, there is a right and wrong way to use a router).

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.
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post #16 of 18 Old 08-06-2020, 02:45 PM
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Keep your eyes peeled. Even though it's been discontinued, I see that a plunge base WAS available for that model.

https://www.woodmagazine.com/review/...e-speed-router

You may stumble over a plunge base just any old time!

Another $000,000,000.02 worth of advice,
Mark
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post #17 of 18 Old 08-06-2020, 09:01 PM
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Building codes require 1-1/4" to 1-1/2" of grabability. Grabability means you must be able to firmly grasp the handrail. No building codes would permit 2x4 or 2x6 construction with a simple rounded over top.
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post #18 of 18 Old 08-11-2020, 05:05 PM Thread Starter
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Understood. The final rail with start with a 3.5” w x 3” h glued stock – all within our city code. Specifically the aforementioned AC2 treated yellow pine (the previous railing was the same and held up OK. It’s currently sitting out in the yard drying out. My photo was just a prototype to see what I could do with what I had. I've already picked up a 1/2" shank router, table and the required CMT bits. Just need time to set it up and shape.

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