Sears molding heads - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 10-28-2015, 07:38 PM Thread Starter
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Sears molding heads

Hello.

I bought two used Craftsman Molding heads 3200 and the larger 3214.
Both fit on my 10" Sears table saw and set to the same height my neophyte eyes see the cuts about the same.

What is the difference between besides just size? Would it been the ability do deeper cuts or cut into hardwood?

Other than setup info I cannot find anything online.

thanks all, Bj
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post #2 of 12 Old 10-29-2015, 03:03 AM
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The only craftsman 3200 i can find is a lawn mower...

At any rate, im guessing the diameter is the same on both, but did you check the width? The only thing i can think of is one may be wider, but odds are theyre equal

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post #3 of 12 Old 10-29-2015, 07:42 AM
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The difference in diameter is the only difference. It would just allow you to make deeper cuts. This is beneficial if making molding in steps with more than one blade.
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post #4 of 12 Old 10-29-2015, 08:41 AM
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I didn't realize people would actually buy these old heads, I've got a few of them tucked back in a drawer that haven't been used for over 20 years. Guess I should get them out and convert them to cash, for me there is absolutely no use for them...
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post #5 of 12 Old 10-29-2015, 09:54 AM
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the larger diameter will produce a faster cutter speed. you will have the same cuts/minute, but a faster cutter speed which should provide a cleaner cut. would be interesting to test to see if that amount provides a worthwhile difference.
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post #6 of 12 Old 10-30-2015, 04:42 PM
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Also more torque. I didn't know there was a smaller version, I have the 3214 and haven't used it since 05. A few of the knives I have were helpful for replicating some historic moldings and casings. I thought they stopped making those in the late 90s.

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post #7 of 12 Old 11-08-2015, 07:01 AM Thread Starter
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Cutting Heads

Thanks for all the replies. I did not think about a faster cutting or more torque. Good call.

If I ever have the time I'd like to see if I can prove that.

After fiddling around with both a real benefit for me and my fat fingers is that I can crank up larger head with more then enough room to change cutters. Not having to remove the head for that chore is a real pleasure.

For the curious I included the pictures I should have had in my first message.
The ruler is to show scale not actual measurements.

Look on eBay to get a price if you are serious about selling your heads. There are others like me I guess....

Again thanks all, Bj
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post #8 of 12 Old 11-09-2015, 11:05 AM
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I inherited a set of those cutters and never really used them until I remodeled my kitchen. I was building a country hutch and for the back I used some old cherry flooring boards (country hutch, not fine furniture). To enhance that "country" look, I wanted beaded boards like you would find in grandma's kitchen back in the 60's - so those molding blades did a real nice job. I'll keep them around!
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post #9 of 12 Old 11-09-2015, 12:07 PM
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30 years ago I tried some of these type molding heads on an old Sears table saw I had at the time. I don't think the heads were well balanced because they caused a major vibration and were very loud. I was about half scared of the set up. I traded them away and got an old shaper.
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post #10 of 12 Old 11-09-2015, 01:47 PM
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My math is a bit rusty but with a 5" diameter cutter head, e.g.,
5 · Π · motor rpm= (X) (X)/12"/5280 · 60=mph

For torque, I may be off a smidge, excluding the knives, the larger the radius of a rotating object the greater the torque at the perimeter, the extra mass of the 3214 ticks it higher still.

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post #11 of 12 Old 11-23-2015, 06:02 AM Thread Starter
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Loud molding head

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
30 years ago I tried some of these type molding heads on an old Sears table saw I had at the time. I don't think the heads were well balanced because they caused a major vibration and were very loud. I was about half scared of the set up. I traded them away and got an old shaper.
They are loud as heck and the first time I used them I was sure I had something wrong. I am used to the volume now however the vibration still can get to me.

I am putting in a zero clearance insert plate just for this setup. The Sears dado throat insert leaves far too much open space.

That will be a noisy day.

Bj
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post #12 of 12 Old 11-26-2015, 11:24 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
30 years ago I tried some of these type molding heads on an old Sears table saw I had at the time. I don't think the heads were well balanced because they caused a major vibration and were very loud. I was about half scared of the set up. I traded them away and got an old shaper.
Hi all.

I installed a link belt from Lee Valley and the vibration went down considerably. I cannot come up with a percentage but it is far more comfortable to use now without all the banging around.

thanks, Bj
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