Sanding a panel wall flat and painting it white instead of removing and drywalling? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 16 Old 06-10-2016, 11:27 AM Thread Starter
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Sanding a panel wall flat and painting it white instead of removing and drywalling?

Sanding a panel wall flat and painting it white instead of removing and replacing with drywall? This is what my handyman told me I can do. Would this look/work the same?

The panel wall has very shallow grooves. something like the pic below, but way older.
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Last edited by WilkersonsCreations; 06-10-2016 at 11:29 AM.
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post #2 of 16 Old 06-10-2016, 12:02 PM
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Yes and no. You would fill the grooves with a great deal of work, paint the wall and it would look great. Then when the weather changes the grooves would start showing up again especially where two sheets seam together. I think it would be more than worth the trouble to either sheetrock over the paneling or remove the paneling and repair and paint the drywall behind. The paneling is probably applied with liquid nails which is a lot of work to scrape off and level.
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post #3 of 16 Old 06-10-2016, 01:08 PM
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I have seen may painted paneled walls, some good, some not so good. when you are done you will have a painted panel wall.


the sanding is an attempt to roughen the surface to accept primer. with these new primer/paint in one, I would try it on an area that was just cleaned, and see how well it sticks.
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post #4 of 16 Old 06-10-2016, 01:50 PM
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Been there, done that. DO NOT DO IT! As Steve says, the minute the weather changes and that paneling expands or contracts all your seams will open and you'll have a wall full of cracks.

Just peel the paneling off and re-sheetrock. It doesn't take that much time and it will look fine in a year or two, which the "band-aid" job won't.

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post #5 of 16 Old 06-10-2016, 03:24 PM
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We painted paneling in our first house, didn't fill the grooves, made sure the seems were all down solid. Looked great, and never had an issue, this house had a floor furnace so it was very dry in the winter months. I owned it as a rental for almost 20 years so I saw that it held up fine over time.

In our third home we removed the paneling, found that the walls had not been sheet rocked underneath, so had to hang drywall, install new trim, and adjust all of the jambs for the difference in wall thickness, a LOT of work.

So the real question is "what are your plans for this house"?

Quick spiff and flip, or sell in a relatively short period will land you on one side of this, and long term keep will likely land you on the other.
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post #6 of 16 Old 06-10-2016, 05:24 PM
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My wife and I were riding around and I was showing the kids where I lived when SWMBO and I met. The present owner was in the yard. We stopped and talked with him, getting an invitation to look inside for old time's sake. I was shocked that someone had painted the paneling in the kitchen and upstairs den. The grooves were very noticable. My parents built the house and they used very expensive oak paneling for those rooms.
Do what you want but, as mentioned, you are in for a lot of work. You might just pull the paneling and sheetrock as suggested.

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post #7 of 16 Old 06-10-2016, 06:18 PM
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Do it right. Go to drywall.
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post #8 of 16 Old 06-10-2016, 06:53 PM
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?????

Why bother to take the paneling off before hanging dry wall?

I LIKE MY PANELING. My wife wanted to change, but it has been there 38 years and will be there as long as I live here!!!!!
Several years ago I took the time and completely redid the interior of the house. Except for MY den.

George
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post #9 of 16 Old 06-10-2016, 07:31 PM
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Um, I don't know where some of you have been, but painted paneling is extremely trendy right now. We had the very nice for it's time 1/4" solid plywood paneling with deep grooves and knot features. Using quality FLAT paint, I was astounded at the difference it made to the room. It looked just like T&G boards. Though I went into the project kicking and screaming (the War Wagon gets what the War Wagon wants!), I have never regretted the wall treatment. The realtor actually made it a selling point of the house when we relocated (go figure).

For the most part, paneling, especially the cheaper type with shallow grooves and printed patterns really date a room, and even the entire home. Those who wish to live in the 70's and 80's will keep it forever. Younger folks or those who follow trends will either paint it or replace it with something else.

That said, and like all those above, I would never fill grooves, and I probably would not attempt to treat the cheaper presswood or thin paneling at all, even though it is way easier to paint than to install and finish drywall. On the other hand, since it's way easier to paint than to replace, what have you got to lose besides twenty bucks in paint and an afternoon? Give it a go and see if you like it. If not, then get the screw gun out and cover it in DW.
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Another $000,000,000.02 worth of advice,
Mark
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post #10 of 16 Old 06-10-2016, 08:55 PM
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I think the OP wants a painted wall like it was sheetrock. Certainly painting paneling and leaving the grooves is doable.
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post #11 of 16 Old 06-10-2016, 09:44 PM
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Trends? Living in the 70's or 80's?

I live in my time in the way I want to live. What I like. What somebody else likes in their house makes no difference to my. It is my house and my likes rule.

I have never understood why so many people are followers and want to be like others.

George
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post #12 of 16 Old 06-10-2016, 11:33 PM
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Decorating fashions change like clothing fashions change. Folks feel just as embarrassed to live in a house with 70's wall paneling as they would going out with bell bottom pants. Besides, if fashions didn't change the professional woodworker wouldn't have as much work.
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post #13 of 16 Old 06-11-2016, 07:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post

Why bother to take the paneling off before hanging dry wall?

How would one deal with the door and window casings and baseboards with the DW on top of the paneling?
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post #14 of 16 Old 06-11-2016, 07:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducbsa View Post
How would one deal with the door and window casings and baseboards with the DW on top of the paneling?
You are going to have to change that out anyway.

George
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post #15 of 16 Old 06-11-2016, 09:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
Trends? Living in the 70's or 80's?

I live in my time in the way I want to live. What I like. What somebody else likes in their house makes no difference to my. It is my house and my likes rule.

I have never understood why so many people are followers and want to be like others.

George
I don't think anyone attacked you for your tastes or choices. By all means you should live in the space and time that you are comfortable with. But your assertion that so many people are followers is flawed.

True, there are those that "keep up with the Jones's". But most trends become trends simply because someone took the risk to change the status quo, and it turned out to be pleasing to others.

The Internet has made decorating much easier to accomplish than in yesteryear. In almost real time, one can search and find thousands of new ideas to make their home aesthetically pleasing. Not everyone has an eye for decorating fashion. Sometimes finding a simple wall treatment done in a hundred different ways can spark a creative brain cell, which in turn can make these folks quite satisfied and happy with the change.

George, if no one changed, this would be a very dull and boring world. We would need no woodworking projects, sans the cabinet that you must have to store food to keep rodents out. Hell, we might still be living in caves. Great life that would be.

But do not despair. Change is inevitable in spite of those who would balk at it. I sometimes have to be poked, prodded or convinced to make the leap, but the vast majority of the time the outcome is quite pleasing and enjoyable, and I'm glad that I jumped.

Open mind.

Another $000,000,000.02 worth of advice,
Mark
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post #16 of 16 Old 06-29-2016, 05:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducbsa View Post
How would one deal with the door and window casings and baseboards with the DW on top of the paneling?
Quote:

You are going to have to change that out anyway.

George

I had the need for jamb extenders in mind. Assuming the trim is painted, the steps to blend these in would sure add to the work.
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