Safest way to rip a 1" piece of long trim? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 35 Old 12-20-2018, 09:43 AM
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Fingerboards are the key

While building a 7' toboggan years ago, I had to rip 12' long 1" x 2" ash strips down to 1/2' x 2"(actually 5/16" material). Using fingerboards to secure the piece to the rip fence AND down to the table surface (fingerboard mounted on rip fence) allowed me to complete this task on a poor contractor saw. The fingerboards secured the work as I approached the end of the work piece, and I was able to finish feeding the remaining 14" of stock through by pulling through from a safe distance. A splitter is mandatory a is a sharp ripping blade. I had no issues running over 144 feet of stock through in this manner and had excellent results. Ash is pretty easy to cut. If you are ripping hardwood, this may not be a solution.

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post #22 of 35 Old 12-20-2018, 12:09 PM
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Actually the "safest" way to feed anything through a machine is with a power feeder.
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post #23 of 35 Old 12-20-2018, 01:17 PM
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if you've ever had one of those cute plastic push stick catch a tooth, you would toss them immediately.
the plastic - some of it 'reinforced' - does not cut like wood, it's much tougher.


for dicey situations I make a special push stick - a thin strip of wood, perhaps fastened to a bigger 'handle' - thin enough to splinter before it can develop much kick back force.
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post #24 of 35 Old 12-20-2018, 04:10 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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OK, I was curious ...

I knew I had a whole bunch of different styles of pushing apparatus/accessories in the shop, so I counted them...... 24 different push sticks, push shoes and push blocks. Some were shop made, others were commercially bought as examples to see how they worked. Shop made ones in my own design were better than all the others. Now that's just my opinion which is biased I know.

I noticed that some of the shoes had been run through the blade and part was missing or sawed off. Same with the sticks. I did make some pretty spiffy push sticks from plastic handled wire brushes where the bristles were removed and I just sawed a notch at the bottom to catch the rear edge of the workpiece. Some may have a unique application and others may be general purpose types. Experience tells me which one to use in which circumstance. Running a push shoe though the blade using the fence as a guide to keep it parallel is quite safe. My argue,ent against using two sticks simultaneously as being unsafe is the one on the side is at an angle, with no means to guide it parallel to the blade and therein is the hazard. You can't just jam something into the saw blade "freehand" and expect" consistent results and that's what may happen if it slips along the length .... and it will.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #25 of 35 Old 12-20-2018, 04:27 PM
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I will say that I will never again use a plastic push stick. They can grab the saw blade and kick back nastily.

Avoiding the blade is very intuitive and anyone with eyes will see where they should not put their hands.

Kick back on the other hand is a very subversive danger. When it has happened to me I was not aware of the risk, and it took me a while to figure out the cause.

I've cut narrow strips using a feather board and a "shuffle" method of feeding. I would feed the material with the push block, then hold down the stock while I suffled the pusher further back and pushed again.

I guess someone could come up with a telescoping two handed pusher. I've never seen one.

My preference is to use a jig to cut narrow pieces up to about 4 feet long. This allows you to cut the strips on the free side of the blade and no kick back is possible. It is easier with strips of 3 feet or so, but longer strips are manageable with a roller stand. Here is a small jig. You would need a much longer one for 4 foot strips.

https://www.woodmagazine.com/woodwor...ip-ripping-jig
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post #26 of 35 Old 12-20-2018, 05:11 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
Actually the "safest" way to feed anything through a machine is with a power feeder.
A bit out of my price range
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post #27 of 35 Old 12-21-2018, 08:20 AM
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post #28 of 35 Old 12-21-2018, 09:59 AM
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or the Rockler jig - $25 on sale.
I've used it on the table saw, router table, spindle sander and bandsaw. bit more 'flexible'

https://www.rockler.com/thin-rip-tablesaw-jig

there are many approaches to 'thin strips' - and many threads the board.
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post #29 of 35 Old 12-21-2018, 11:56 AM
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A zero clearance insert is probably a good idea, too.
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post #30 of 35 Old 12-21-2018, 01:07 PM
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after making sure I have the correct blade on for ripping, you do not want excess force in the cut - I feed long strips by hand, then finish with a push stick.


BUT, I have worked with table saws more inferior than mine that rattle and roll as they run, I would not want to place my hands as close a I do my unisaw.
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post #31 of 35 Old 12-21-2018, 01:23 PM
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that's not the same as ripping a long, narrow one

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This home made jig looks very appealing. I may make one.

How to Cut Thin Strips at the Table Saw // Thin Rip Jig // Woodworking Jig - YouTube
For shorter thin strips that jig or it's clone works great. The OP has a long narrow piece he wants to rip, essentially down the center. That leaves very little if any stock to hold onto. So, we end up with feather boards to maintain fence registration and some means to hold the work down clamped to the fence at the rear of the blade. Then pushing the work into the blade is the last step, keeping the hands far way from the blade. The "follower" works great for this whether a scrap or an extra workpiece. The "follower" should be the same dimensions as the workpiece to avoid conflict with the feather board setting.

I don't know if I would go to the trouble of changing to a rip blade considering the thickness of the workpiece is only 1/2". A 40 tooth blade should be fine.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #32 of 35 Old 12-21-2018, 01:43 PM
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These push shoes should be plain and simple No handles, no nothing. Normally 8 " long should be sufficient and about 6" high should do it. I dont have any handy so i cant take measurements. The main thing is that these shoes should be thought of as VERY disposable. If you are cutting a narrow strip 1/2" wide with a 3/4" wide shoe, you should expect the blade to go through the shoe. Common sense will tell you when to throw it away. A good practice would be is to make one everytime you have a plywood scrap large enough.
You will find out pretty quickly that if the wood to be cut is thin, you may have to remove some of the heel so that you are putting the downward pressure on the work piece and not just sliding the shoe on the table of the saw.

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post #33 of 35 Old 12-21-2018, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducbsa View Post
A zero clearance insert is probably a good idea, too.
A zero clearance insert is always a good idea.

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post #34 of 35 Old 12-21-2018, 03:02 PM
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Cutting a long, thin, narrow strip on a table saw is dangerous no matter how you do it, I have a method that works for me, however that may not be the best method for someone else. When it is worth setting up a power feeder that is my preferred method for both work on a table saw or a router table.

I would advise anyone to carefully consider the methods suggested, think it through, understand the pitfalls and try to imagine the danger points of the different methods.

Some points to consider:

The feed end must be held against the fence and down to the table at all times.

The material should never be between the turning saw blade and the fence unless it is being held there by some means so it cannot be kicked back.

Using a follower to push the material through presents the problem of how to push the follower through or how to stop the blade while maintaining control of it.

Everyone posting here means well, but that does not mean that what they suggest is always the safest method.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #35 of 35 Old 12-21-2018, 03:14 PM
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Extracting the follower ....

The follower needs to be long enough to extract it without running it all the way past the blade. Simple. Push the workpiece through the blade using the follower, then stop the saw and retract the follower. Know where the OFF switch is at all times so you can turn the saw off in a hurry/emergency. The best OFF switch is located at thigh height and can be "bumped" off without taking your eyes off the blade OR your hands off the workpiece. Like this on my Sawzilla:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-21-2018 at 03:38 PM.
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