S3S vs RGH - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 12-31-2007, 11:34 AM Thread Starter
 
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S3S vs RGH

I recently decided to stop wasting money on s4s and try to save some by going to rough cut. What I'm wondering is if I should go with S3S or RGH. I'm planning on buying a planer but I have no joiner so I'd have to table saw the edges with a jig if I got RGH. It seems RGH is quite a bit cheaper, almost 1/2 at some places, over s3s.. so is it worth the extra time and saw blades?

If so, anyone recommend some plans for a jig? I have a Jet JWSS-10lfr SuperSaw which I really like, and it includes a gliding table.

Thanks,
BlackNoir
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post #2 of 6 Old 12-31-2007, 07:14 PM
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I purchase all my lumber rough and then work it my self, heck thats half the fun, plus it supports our local saw mill guys and not the big box corporates.
I use a router and staight edge since I do not have a jointer either, works pretty good.

Did you say tool sale?
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post #3 of 6 Old 12-31-2007, 09:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackNoir View Post
I recently decided to stop wasting money on s4s and try to save some by going to rough cut. What I'm wondering is if I should go with S3S or RGH. I'm planning on buying a planer but I have no joiner so I'd have to table saw the edges with a jig if I got RGH. It seems RGH is quite a bit cheaper, almost 1/2 at some places, over s3s.. so is it worth the extra time and saw blades?

If so, anyone recommend some plans for a jig? I have a Jet JWSS-10lfr SuperSaw which I really like, and it includes a gliding table.

Thanks,
BlackNoir
If your plans are to do any type of in house wood work, you need to joint it anyway. You can do it by hand with a hand plane.
My thought is that the first item I would buy would be the jointer, as most suppliers bring in stock, and a 6 portable jointer is not really expensive. Providing you are not trying to joint real big stuff. I have a 6 delta jointer and 12 planer that I take on jobs when necessary, I have had them for years and they can do most of what my shop equipment can do.
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post #4 of 6 Old 12-31-2007, 11:45 PM
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My first thought also is that you need a jointer. Rough sawed has to be flattened on one face before it is planed. I don't know how much work you plan on doing, but I think you will be disappointed with your output if you use rough sawed stock - especially without all the equipment.

I used to buy my stock "skip-planed", sometimes called "hit or miss", and straight-lined one edge, from my suppliers. They used strato planes for this proceedure which do not use high pressure feed rollers, so the planer head is not following the bumps on the other side of the board. This type of planing leaves the boards relatively flat. My 4/4 stock would come in at 15/16ths thick done this way as opposed to from 1" to 1 3/16ths" in the rough.

This saves a whole lot of time making, and expense getting rid of the chips.


Good luck.
Jimc
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post #5 of 6 Old 01-01-2008, 11:20 AM
 
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About the easiest way to cut a straight edge on rough stock is to build a simple jig I'll attempt to accurately descibe. Get a piece plywood about 6-8" inches wide (straight/parallel edges) and maybe 8' long. Screw a stop block across the trailing end of the plywood - check that it's 90 degrees to the plywood edges. Then screw the piece to be cut onto the plywood at the ends of the piece to be cut, with one end against the stop block. Just leave one edge of the plywood jig clear so it can be run against the fence on the tablesaw. Then set the fence at a width that will catch all of the edge of the piece to be cut, and let 'er rip. One straight edge in no time. (If I haven't clearly described this, I think I can find a thread somewhere that I know has pictures of it.)

Making the jump from S4S to RS really calls for both a jointer and planer. Trying to do it with only one can be done, but it requires a lot of fiddling around to accomplish. A planer CAN be used as a jointer to produce one flat surface, but that calls for another jig system. I have a 6" jointer, but I can use the planer to do wider stuff.

The best part of using RS is that some of the S4S 3/4 lumber actually needs planing, jointin to get good material, so you end up with stock thinner than 3/4, which is kinda flimsy. I've gotten 15/16ths or 7/8 lumber from 1" RS and it makes for sturdier construction.
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post #6 of 6 Old 01-02-2008, 11:47 PM
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what are you planning to make?

A lot depends on what you are making. When I build cabinet doors, I always start with 15/16" stock. This is because it is never flat. There's always a cup or a crook or a bow...For frame and panel doors, the rails and stiles need to be as flat as possible to begin with in order to minimize warpage potential. This means rough cutting the parts, planing one face on the jointer, thickness planing on the planer, then jointing one edge, referenced off of a flat, planed face. And ending up with 3/4" thickness.
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