Routing with a Pattern Makers bit... - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 12-04-2011, 02:32 PM Thread Starter
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Angry Routing with a Pattern Makers bit...

OK, if I don't figure this out I'm either going to go crazy or take off a few fingers! I am trying to put a nice curve on some pieces for a handful of clocks I'm building; the pieces are 3"x1-1/2" and all hardwood (this particular one is Hickory). I have a crappy, underpowered 9" bandsaw, and trying to cut the curve is almost impossible. So, I decided to use a Pattern Bit in my router table instead. I remove a bit of waste with the band saw, and go to the router table. But, everytime the bit touches the wood, no matter how I feed it, it grabs & tears the wood! What the heck am I doing wrong? I have a 2.3hp Bosch router, a 3/4"x2" Pattern Bit with a 1/2" shank. Any help/ideas would be very much appreciated!
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post #2 of 12 Old 12-04-2011, 02:45 PM
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Can you slow the router down (is it variable speed)? That might help. What about taking more off with band saw? New bandsaw blade?

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #3 of 12 Old 12-04-2011, 02:46 PM
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Wow! That some really thick stock! Pattern bits are really only effective if you rough trim the piece pretty close... 1/4-1/3 the bit's diameter is what I go by.

My only suggestion is to set your router as fast as it will go and not start on a hard corner. Please be careful though, that's a lot of cutting surface spinning at very high speed!

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
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post #4 of 12 Old 12-04-2011, 02:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brizak79 View Post
OK, if I don't figure this out I'm either going to go crazy or take off a few fingers! I am trying to put a nice curve on some pieces for a handful of clocks I'm building; the pieces are 3"x1-1/2" and all hardwood (this particular one is Hickory). I have a crappy, underpowered 9" bandsaw, and trying to cut the curve is almost impossible. So, I decided to use a Pattern Bit in my router table instead. I remove a bit of waste with the band saw, and go to the router table. But, everytime the bit touches the wood, no matter how I feed it, it grabs & tears the wood! What the heck am I doing wrong? I have a 2.3hp Bosch router, a 3/4"x2" Pattern Bit with a 1/2" shank. Any help/ideas would be very much appreciated!
Are those all pieces togother and you are trying to cut with that bit. Never happen it will grab. You need to explain a little more. If you are trying to take 2" off you need a fence set up. and the bit just touching the wood maybe 1/32 or small amount at a time and feed into the rotation of the bit. Now when you turn the wood the bit will just take off ever how much the bit is sticking out of the fence. check these bits with beiring also a pattern with bit with beiring following the pattern will come out good . it is call a pattern/flush trim bit 7807 is one bit ? just look and you should find one that will work . http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/order.../bt_flush.html

Last edited by del schisler; 12-04-2011 at 03:02 PM. Reason: more info
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post #5 of 12 Old 12-04-2011, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by del schisler View Post
Are those all pieces togother and you are trying to cut with that bit. Never happen it will grab. You need to explain a little more. If you are trying to take 2" off you need a fence set up. and the bit just touching the wood maybe 1/32 or small amount at a time and feed into the rotation of the bit. Now when you turn the wood the bit will just take off ever how much the bit is sticking out of the fence. check these bits with beiring also a pattern with bit with beiring following the pattern will come out good . it is call a pattern/flush trim bit 7807 is one bit ? just look and you should find one that will work . http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/order.../bt_flush.html
The bit I have DOES have a bearing (at the bottom), and I am using a pattern (1/2" MDF). I tried planing the excess down with a hand power planer, and that seems to help, as well as slowing the bit down as far as it will go. Also, one side of my pattern works better with the bit rotation that the other, but that means when I flip the part over to finish routing the other end, I have to start the bit on a hard edge. Not sure how to get around that problem...

Last edited by brizak79; 12-04-2011 at 03:36 PM.
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post #6 of 12 Old 12-04-2011, 04:00 PM
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Pattern bits are just that...they follow a pattern and trim an EDGE. They aren't designed to surface large areas. You may try "climb cuttting", which is routing with the direction of the rotation of the bit, not into the rotation. If the stock is too high for the bit, use a pattern on both top and bottom edges.

I'm suggesting that you not try to rout the face like you are doing. I'm also suggesting that a power plane will eat the piece up before you can say Ticonderoga. I would work that face down with a hand plane or spoke shave, or a block sander...try something like this.








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post #7 of 12 Old 12-04-2011, 04:12 PM
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all good advice above

That's way too much for that bit to handle in my opinion.
You'll only be 1/2 way done even if you can get it to work. The rotation of the cutter is pulling the wood fibers away from the workpiece. It's like routing end grain, well it is routing end grain and it's gonna tear out.

My free advice is to get a brand new 3 to 6 TPI blade for your crappy bandsaw and just take your time and let the saw blade determine the speed of feed. Hickory is about one of the hardest woods to work and has plenty of grain changes which result in tear out, so a close bandsaw cut followed by a stationary belt sander will get you home in no time. Again gentle feeding on the sander with a new belt will make a big difference in reducing burns from overheating.
This is not an easy procedure with that thickness and Hickory unless you have some heavy duty tools in the shop. This is one of those times I wish I could reach into my monitor and grab the piece, saw it, sand it and pass it back to you. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #8 of 12 Old 12-05-2011, 12:20 AM
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I agree that you should get more of the waste off before routing. I could be wrong but it looks like you started routing in the middle of the workpiece....it would be better if you could have the router bit ride on the jig an inch or two before the cut and transition into the workpiece.
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post #9 of 12 Old 12-05-2011, 01:04 AM
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Do what Bill says. Another problem you may have is with that much vibration/chatter, you will loosen up your bit; not to mention bending or breaking your collet.

Harrison, at your service!
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post #10 of 12 Old 12-05-2011, 01:16 AM
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Your router set up is scaring me. I go back to the band saw. I'd try a 1/4" skip tooth hook blade. The narrow blades reduces drag and your band saw will cut with more power. IMHO most people think they need a wide band saw blade for re-sawing but what they really need is a sharp narrow one. With my band saw I can cut 12" high in hardwood easily with the 1/4" blade as long as it's sharp.

Bret
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post #11 of 12 Old 12-05-2011, 07:17 AM
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i would highly recommend a spiral pattern bit, they make all the differance in the world. we do a lotof that style cut. if you can try to lessen the amount of depth you are cutting at a time, maybe an inch or less, rather than the whole thing.
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post #12 of 12 Old 12-05-2011, 09:30 AM
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Completely wrong approach for what you want to do. A circle cutting jig on the bandsaw would cut the shape accurately, clean it up with an edge/belt sander. Doesn't sound like you have the proper power equipment for the job. The work piece is too large. Hand tool method would cut the shape with a bow saw, plane, scrape or sand to final surface.

With circular work, the grain reverses on each side of the apex. You often have to climb cut one side but you don't climb cut the same way you ordinarily cut with the grain. You start at the other end, take a nibble, then move ahead a little and take another nibble. You don't want to have any waste behind the cutter or it will grab. Hard to describe but it isn't something that's appropriate for your situation.
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