Routing Doug Fir - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 03-27-2012, 03:56 PM Thread Starter
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Routing Doug Fir

So the double addy chair is at a hault aging because I got a new project I'm getting paid to do. It's a swing frame for a hanging love seat. They requested fir and I was going to either chamfer or round over the edges as well as use my lettering templates to put the last name in it. My issue? Routing fir is hard I hear because it's vertical grain. One of my coworkers told me to work WITH the rotation of the router while following the grain. Sounds hard and dangerous. Any suggestions?

"If you don't want to wear chaps, that's fine with me I wouldn't in this heat either, just be careful. The crazy part is: it's 97 degrees out and youre wearing blue jeans. I don't see why you refuse to just wear shorts if you don't want chaps. Jeans are not going to stop a chainsaw from ruining your day."
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post #2 of 10 Old 03-27-2012, 05:13 PM
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If you mean running the router backwards you can get mixed results. Often it will do fine but sometimes it can cause the router bit to come out causing a deeper cut than what you wanted. You would be better off using a good sharp router bit and routing forward with it in multiple passes adjusting the depth each time. You can reduce the blowout if you watch the grain of the wood and route the edge with a favorable grain direction. You really shouldn't have much trouble with a chamfer or a round over cut anyway.
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post #3 of 10 Old 03-27-2012, 05:25 PM
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So the double addy chair is at a hault aging because I got a new project I'm getting paid to do. It's a swing frame for a hanging love seat. They requested fir and I was going to either chamfer or round over the edges as well as use my lettering templates to put the last name in it. My issue? Routing fir is hard I hear because it's vertical grain. One of my coworkers told me to work WITH the rotation of the router while following the grain. Sounds hard and dangerous. Any suggestions?
Douglas Fir routs fairly easy and isn't that hard. On the Janka Scale it's 660, while Red Oak is 1290. I would only use carbide tipped bits. Handheld routing should be from left to right (as you're feeding). "Climb cutting" (routing right to left handheld) would lessen tear out if that's what's happening...especially on end grain.

Climb cutting versus regular cutting.




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post #4 of 10 Old 03-27-2012, 05:42 PM
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Plus one on what's been said already. Tear out is probably the issue your friend was referring to. Because of the grain, the chips from tear out can get pretty large.
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post #5 of 10 Old 03-27-2012, 06:47 PM
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You should identify the predominant grain pattern like Steve Neul drew, not only with fir but with every species and every cut, router, planer, jointer, shaper. The only time it's not necessary is when using a saw. In those rare instances when you need to do a climb cut, you also have to work with the grain direction. It's usually the grain direction that determines how you have to make a cut. Go against it and the probability of tear out is almost guaranteed. End grain is different. You may get tear out on the exit when you rout across it in the normal way, against the rotation of the bit. That is often removed if the cut also goes down the edge afterwards. Otherwise, you use a backer piece. A climb cut on end grain can still give you tear out and/or burning.
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post #6 of 10 Old 03-30-2012, 10:31 AM Thread Starter
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Ok getting ready to route tonight and I might have missed this one buuuuut... Bit speed? High or low?

"If you don't want to wear chaps, that's fine with me I wouldn't in this heat either, just be careful. The crazy part is: it's 97 degrees out and youre wearing blue jeans. I don't see why you refuse to just wear shorts if you don't want chaps. Jeans are not going to stop a chainsaw from ruining your day."
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post #7 of 10 Old 03-30-2012, 10:42 AM
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Ok getting ready to route tonight and I might have missed this one buuuuut... Bit speed? High or low?
What bit(s) are you using, and what speeds does your router have. More than likely it will be full speed...whatever that is, unless you have a large diameter bit, and the router has speed selection.





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post #8 of 10 Old 03-30-2012, 09:14 PM Thread Starter
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It's max is 22000. I'm using a 1 3/8" 45 degree chamfer 1/4" shank.

"If you don't want to wear chaps, that's fine with me I wouldn't in this heat either, just be careful. The crazy part is: it's 97 degrees out and youre wearing blue jeans. I don't see why you refuse to just wear shorts if you don't want chaps. Jeans are not going to stop a chainsaw from ruining your day."
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post #9 of 10 Old 03-30-2012, 10:33 PM
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It's max is 22000. I'm using a 1 3/8" 45 degree chamfer 1/4" shank.
I would run it at that speed.






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post #10 of 10 Old 03-30-2012, 11:58 PM Thread Starter
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I misspoke its 24000. I took your advice and it came out great! No chunks or tear outs or anything. Love my new 2.25hp dewalt! Didn't struggle a bit. My old 1.75hp craftsman would probably crapped its pants.

"If you don't want to wear chaps, that's fine with me I wouldn't in this heat either, just be careful. The crazy part is: it's 97 degrees out and youre wearing blue jeans. I don't see why you refuse to just wear shorts if you don't want chaps. Jeans are not going to stop a chainsaw from ruining your day."
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