Router fuzz - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 10-28-2012, 03:25 PM Thread Starter
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Router fuzz

When you rout a board and it leaves wood fibers sticking up along the edge, how do you remove it? I just spent at least an hour with a utility knife and a sharp chisel just painstakingly removing it all by hand on 11 different parts for my project. I got it all off finally but that's not a process I want to become used to on each future project. Would you sand this off normally? That would be an option on rabbeted edges but on profile routed edges it could be pretty difficult.
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post #2 of 10 Old 10-28-2012, 03:45 PM
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The fuzz was more than likely caused by routing against the grain. The best way to clean up the fuzz after you have it is to sand it off. If possible you can joint a 1/32 off the edge of the board and route it again. With most woods a light trim with the router will clean the fuzz up.
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post #3 of 10 Old 10-28-2012, 04:13 PM
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I get another board. Usually that is what I call fuzzy grain. And it matters not what you do to it, it will fuzz up.

Sometimes it will be routing against the grain, usually that means chip out.

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
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post #4 of 10 Old 10-28-2012, 04:29 PM
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Hi Duane - I usually get that with soft wood, pine in particular. It can get really bad on end grain cuts, ie the coping cut on rails.
You can clean much of it up with just a second pass, not changing any fence or bit settings. Otherwise I use a 180 grit sanding sponge, about $3 at WalMart. The endgrain ones are the toughest, usually call for a sharp chisel.

John

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post #5 of 10 Old 10-28-2012, 07:34 PM Thread Starter
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This was soft pine and it was end grain also. It didn't do it along the long sides, just the ends only. I thought it was my technique, maybe I went too fast. I tried slowing down some but got wood burn. I was cutting rabbets to make tongue in groove joints so none of the burn will show but I want to learn to do things right. Knowing that soft pine can cause some of this, I don't feel so bad now. I probably should have made multiple, shallow passes but I just hogged out the whole 1/4 x 1/4 rabbets all at once. Maybe that was my mistake.
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post #6 of 10 Old 10-28-2012, 08:20 PM
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You will get fuzz on cross grain cuts. There isn't any getting around it but sharp bits can lesson the amount. An easy way to remove it is to stand the fuzz up by using a stick moved against the way the fuzz is leaning, pulled down the length of the cut. Then you use a sanding block, sanding in one direction, it only takes one stroke with a fine paper, 220 +-. In these pictures of a dado with fuzz on both sides, I do one side at a time, stand up the left side, sand one stroke from right to left, opposite on the right side, the fuzz will be leaning the other way. Once the fuzz is stood up, you can cut it off with a sharp chisel too but you run the risk of it cutting into the work piece where it will show if you aren't careful and the chisel isn't real sharp.

I used to teach a beginning woodworking class. For an initial training project we would make a simple Shaker coat rack, nothing more than a board with pegs and an edge routed around the perimeter. We started with rough stock and went through the milling process which allowed me to cover all the basic woodworking machines. It would take three weeks to make the simple rack since I would thoroughly teach the set up and safety procedures for each machine along the way. When we routed the end grain, everyone wanted to pull on the fuzz to remove it, kind of funny since this was the case with every student over years and I always told them not to touch it yet, we would get to it later. It just bugged them and they would start pulling on it, often pulling back fibers where it would show.
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Last edited by Hammer1; 10-28-2012 at 08:23 PM.
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post #7 of 10 Old 10-28-2012, 10:21 PM Thread Starter
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I wondered if there was a sanding trick for this but I don't have a sanding block, only palm sanders. It's on my list to buy now. I used a sharp chisel and it worked. Took a long time though, I had to be careful with it and make multiple passes to remove it all and not get into the wood. I'll remember for next time about using the sanding block. All went well on this one though.
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post #8 of 10 Old 10-28-2012, 10:45 PM
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It's standing up the fuzz that makes it easy to remove, otherwise only parts are removed. Just wrap some sandpaper around a block of wood and hit the fuzz perpendicularly, not along the length, keeping the block flat on the work.
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post #9 of 10 Old 10-28-2012, 11:19 PM
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I have been using a lot of "select pine" (soft wood). I mainly used a Roman oggee bit and was getting a lot of it. I switched to a Freud bit and and it has made a huge difference. I still get some but not much... And it is much easier to remove.
When this bit wears down, I plan to replace it with freuds quadra cut bit which is supposed to help minimize the fuzz even more.

My point here is that cheap bits vs. Quality bits can really help.... Just my 2 cents.
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post #10 of 10 Old 10-28-2012, 11:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davester84 View Post
I have been using a lot of "select pine" (soft wood). I mainly used a Roman oggee bit and was getting a lot of it. I switched to a Freud bit and and it has made a huge difference. I still get some but not much... And it is much easier to remove.
When this bit wears down, I plan to replace it with freuds quadra cut bit which is supposed to help minimize the fuzz even more.

My point here is that cheap bits vs. Quality bits can really help.... Just my 2 cents.
I've been drooling over those quadra cuts.
http://www.freudtools.com/t-quadra-cut.aspx

They don't seem to have them in a rail/stile set yet though. That's where the chipping is most aggravating, on the cope cut.

John

If I strive for perfection, I can generally achieve good'nuff, If I strive for good'nuff, I generally achieve firewood
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