ripping a 45 dregree angle on 10 feet long board - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 05-02-2016, 06:58 PM Thread Starter
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ripping a 45 dregree angle on 10 feet long board

hello everyone, I am new here and a semi novice (never ending learning in this field :)) in the wood working field and was hoping to get ok on set up I using or maybe a better idea to get the perfect 45 on suck a long board. here the detail...

I am building fake beams, Oak 1"x8"x10' for my ceiling that covering my existing rough log beam (old farm house ) in living room that 10 feet long

I using a Dewalt 744 table saw, the blade I be using is high end Carbide Tipped Glue Line Blade 10" x 24 teeth so get a clean cut on the 45 (can't afford tear out). The blade on table tilts to left away from the fence and the board will be held on the table with 3 feather board 1 at front blad pushing it against the fence and 1 at front holding the board down and 3 one behind the blade holding the board down to make sure the board not slip since such long boards, I will be biscuit joint the entire length of the 10 feet board so be easier to line up the 45 when I glue it then I will be do dove tail splines along the entire 45 for a wow factor and also make the 45 stronger.

will this be the best way to make the long cuts on 10 feet or is there better method. I though maybe making a jig so the blade sit at 90% instead of 45 and board run threw at the angle instead. tried find video on how to or if anything did this but cant find so thinking the method I mention above the best way. like hear from other on this so see if my thought are right as the best way. these 10 feet boards are costly so need to job right and perfect first time no margin for error or need buy another 10 feet of board for every mistake lol.

Last edited by Steve_; 05-02-2016 at 07:01 PM.
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post #2 of 11 Old 05-02-2016, 08:27 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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support that board properly!

You will need an infeed and outfeed support whether it's a roller or a stand, absolutely get something.

Next practice on a 8ft or 10 ft piece of Pine, not your good board. You can make as many passes as you need to feel comfortable. Keep in mind that any variation from the fence or a pause in the cutting process may cause a "hollow" in the cut. Just maintain constant pressure against the fence and constant feeding pressure.... not easy, but possible.

Your saw blade should be set to 45 degrees, and you do not need a jig for this operation. You will want to sight down the cut afterward and see if it's straight. A little work with a block plane may be needed to clean up the ends.

It should all be just fine, but you will need 24 ft of run to make the cuts..... nothing in the way. :smile3:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #3 of 11 Old 05-02-2016, 09:21 PM Thread Starter
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thanks for the reply. I have a out feed table that is 68" x 48" that I made give me approx. 7 feet from back of the blade but you right 7 feet not enough I need a roller beyond that.. but infeed I don't have infeed was thinking myself being the infeed since I be one pushing the board but reading your post that is far away to push the board and also watch the fence also, hmm so I need buy 2 rollers and hope and prey the feather board will hold it tight to the fence. But yea keep same speed to end going be a challenge. to keep same speed almost need be fully behind the board feeding it in so u can walk at same pace. feeding it will body at the side of the board on a roller hand over hand feeding it will cause delays I thinking? would be better no roller for infeed and walking the board into the blade at a steady same speed walk?
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post #4 of 11 Old 05-03-2016, 12:50 PM
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Have you considered using a circular saw? Then you can clamp the board down on saw horses and move the saw. I think you'd have more control over the feed rate, and it seems like less work.
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post #5 of 11 Old 05-03-2016, 01:59 PM
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You can walk beside an infeed roller set up as you feed the stock into your table saw, somewhere Woodnthings shows how he uses a plank on top of the rollers to support the material along its length not just at one point.

Be aware that your material will likely move over the changing seasons so you need clearance around the exiting logs so it doesn't bind and open the joints, sometimes depending on the grain of the material a simple butt joint can be almost invisible and less noticeable than a crack at the corner of the beam.

I would be leery of accenting the joints with bling, they are the weak points and it is not always the best idea to draw attention to them.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #6 of 11 Old 05-03-2016, 03:16 PM
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did similar many years ago - 12' covers for ugly structural beams.
it ain't easy being pretty and accurate.

couple of lessons learned:
- the board(s) have to be straight
- you have to have a perfectly straight fence edge
- you the wobbly human cannot 'be the infeed' - you need absolute (near - within a couple inches) full support in and out - vertically and horizontally - this means a very long fence infeed and outfeed - albeit a temporary fence. the least 'alignment' twitch makes divots and this goes 141.44271% (inverse sin) for a 45' miter.

featherboards smertherboards. I eventually made braces with ball bearings to move on and fastened completely rigid on the guiding side.

dump the outfeed guide/featherboard idea. if it ain't right going in, it ain't gonna be right coming out.
do your set up - do multiple 'no spining objects' dummy passes to be absolutely certain nothing hangs up or binds. if it feels wobbly, it is wobbly. double up on the infeed guide.

and, after everything is set up and pushing through smoothly - don't go for an all or nothing one pass cut. nibble it - just half the 45' bevel width. check the alignment / perfection of cut. then nibble again; the less force/push needed, the cleaner the cut - I'd nibble until the finish dimension is about 50% of the blade kerf.

...The blade on table tilts to left away from the fence
this is the best way to avoid tear out. the teeth are moving "down" thru the finished edge. tear out on the edge inside the box is not an issue.

for the center slat with 45' on both sides - consider a method to glue/screw a perfectly straight 'rail' down the middle - using some flavor of non-edge spacer/fence on the rail. or using a longer blank, nail it to an overhanging straight board. it's best to use a one-and-the-same middle rail, because getting 'perfect' alignment of a 'added later' piece is not the easiest thing.

using an already been 45' beveled edge along a fence to create a precise straight 45' down the other side.... tricky stuff, that.

unable to follow the biscuit&dove tail things. however, gluing a box beam cover along a 45' joint will be more than adequately strong. 'decorations' can be added later.
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Last edited by TomCT2; 05-03-2016 at 03:18 PM.
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post #7 of 11 Old 05-03-2016, 04:07 PM
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There seem to me to be conflicting statements here.

I think that you DO WANT both infeed and outfeed supports. You cannot just let the weight of the board hang off the back of the saw. Seven feet past the blade should be sufficient as that has 7/10 of the boars supported so it should not try to fall.

A roller on the infeed is probably sufficient, but more would be better if you can provide.

I would definitely use the feather boards as you describe.

I do not see how a spline would be decorative in the use you describe. Biscuits would probably be good on that long of a joint to help with alignment. They will not necessarily add strength. Do not try to use both. Choose one or the other. I would choose splines.

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post #8 of 11 Old 05-03-2016, 07:03 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the great information guys and it giving me good ideas in pursuing this task . I will for sure buy 2 rollers before I start this project. and GeorgeC the spline for me more for look but I read that spline also will prevent 45 from coming apart over time but for me it mainly about the looks when adding splines every 2 inches or so along the length of both sides of the beam using darker wood like black walnut and got the dovetail look that make it unique and wow factor because it rare u never see that, well I haven't even in pic or in real life :). I see spline on boxes and make box look real nice so imagine entire 10 feet beam looking like that. I have the rockler Large box spline jig to do that part of the job.

only thing it hard finding 10 feet board perfect straight but I be doing my best getting them, I will be hand picking them from the mill :). This will be good experience got 16 beam I have to do.

Last edited by Steve_; 05-03-2016 at 07:06 PM.
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post #9 of 11 Old 05-03-2016, 07:18 PM
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16! 😨😨😨 Maybe this is a job for veneer.

Make it out of a cheaper wood, make it square and veneer it.
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post #10 of 11 Old 05-03-2016, 07:32 PM
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there's another way ...

Instead of miter/beveling the joints you could use a rabbet. It would be easier to get "perfect" and you could not tell that it was that way unless you got up real close. The rabbet joint would use a straight board, no fancy cuts and a board with a thin lip or extension onto which the straight edge board "sits". When glued and nailed the thin lip will almost disappear and blend with the straight board. Like this:
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #11 of 11 Old 05-03-2016, 10:00 PM
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I would cut this on my table saw using a 40 tooth blade. Smoother cut.
I like a helper with anything real long where a clean cut is required.
My helper us usually my wife. It only takes a few minutes to make these cuts.
I've used rollers but I prefer the helper.
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If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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