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post #1 of 29 Old 08-14-2019, 03:38 PM Thread Starter
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rip blade?

I have a brand new table saw and I am unable to rip a 2 x 6 piece of construction/treated lumber. Do I need a special rip blade to do this? Your input is greatly appreciated.
Rick from Texas
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post #2 of 29 Old 08-14-2019, 04:04 PM
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The fewer the teeth the better when ripping. The best I've ever used was a fiber cement blade. It has only six teeth on the whole blade.
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post #3 of 29 Old 08-14-2019, 04:18 PM
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Do you have a splitter on your saw? Wet lumber will close up and bind on the lumber. It is also a kick back risk. If you don't have a splitter, then cut as far as feeds easily and turn off the saw and then hammer in a shim to spread the material.

But a splitter is best. If you took off the splitter (along with the guard), put it back in place and try again.
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post #4 of 29 Old 08-14-2019, 04:59 PM
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Simple answer, yes, fewer teeth the better, 24 tooth is fairly standard. You need to use the proper blade for the job, which means you will be changing blades as the type of cut you have to make changes. You can get by with a combination blade for utility work but there will be trade offs.

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post #5 of 29 Old 08-14-2019, 05:39 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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ripping is much different than crosscutting ......

Quote:
Originally Posted by rick from texas View Post
I have a brand new table saw and I am unable to rip a 2 x 6 piece of construction/treated lumber. Do I need a special rip blade to do this? Your input is greatly appreciated.
Rick from Texas

What is the blade that's on the saw now? Most new saws don't come with a quality blade, just so you know.



I use Diablo Thin Kerf blades from Amazon or Home depot:
Ripping 24 teeth
General purpose 40 teeth
Combination 50 teeth
Cross cutting 60 teeth
Fine finish for miter frames 80 teeth


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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #6 of 29 Old 08-14-2019, 09:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rick from texas View Post
I have a brand new table saw and I am unable to rip a 2 x 6 piece of construction/treated lumber. Do I need a special rip blade to do this? Your input is greatly appreciated.
Rick from Texas
Hi Rick! Welcome to WoodworkingTalk! Sorry to hear about your problems.

What does "unable to rip a 2 x 6 piece of construction/treated lumber" mean? The more details you provide, the better.

Which model table saw did you buy? 110v? How much horsepower?
Did you check its alignments with a combination square or other tools?
Is the insert level with the table?
Which blade are you using? It is new, not worn, right?
How high are you raising the blade?
What happens when it is unable to rip the board?
Does the blade slow down or stop turning?
Does the wood get pinched or blocked somewhere as you push it through?
Are you using the blade guards, riving knife, splitter, anti-kickback pawls, or other safety gadgets? Could one of them be interfering with the cut?

Have you tried other cuts with your new table saw? Which cuts did you make? Were they successful?

Have you tried cutting a piece of the same lumber with another saw? A handsaw or circular saw? What happened?
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post #7 of 29 Old 08-14-2019, 10:06 PM
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Rick, welcome to the forum.
Seems like you already got the advice yuou needed.

So, where in Tx are u located. Quite a few Texans here.

Tony B



Retired woodworker, amongst other things, Sold full time cruising boat and now full time cruising in RV. Currently in Denison, Tx
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post #8 of 29 Old 08-14-2019, 10:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
What is the blade that's on the saw now? Most new saws don't come with a quality blade, just so you know.
[...]
Yup. Those are the blades I use to cut up scrap and junk, like pressure treated lumber! (I prefer to save the good blades for finer woodworking.)
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post #9 of 29 Old 08-15-2019, 05:21 AM
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My B&D circular saw had an 8 tooth blade when new. I later bought a 36 tooth Bosch T/C tipped blade when making a cabinet.
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post #10 of 29 Old 08-15-2019, 05:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rick from texas View Post
I have a brand new table saw and I am unable to rip a 2 x 6 piece of construction/treated lumber. Do I need a special rip blade to do this? Your input is greatly appreciated.
Rick from Texas
Seems like most people arent really touching on the actual question, but no, you do not 'need' a special blade just for ripping operations.

Now, a dedicated, low tooth count ripping blade does make the process easier and can give good results, but you do not need one. A lot of people, myself included, get by just fine with a 40t "combination" blade for all operations. A dedicated ripping blade will allow you to feed a piece through faster, and in some cases give a cleaner cut, so its not a bad idea to have one, but not a requirement by any means.

If your current blade isnt cutting it, theres a few things to look at. The biggest one is the possibility that your piece of wood is closing up on the blade, causing it to bind. Happens a lot with construction lumber, its just the nature of the beast. The best fix is to use something like a riving knife that prevents the wood from closing up on the cut, but barring that ive had decent results by making an incremental cut, starting shallow and raising the blade by about 1/2" at a time. Works well enough for me

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post #11 of 29 Old 08-15-2019, 10:46 AM
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As mentioned, first be sure the wood isn't binding. Construction lumber can have a lot of internal stress due to the rapid kiln drying.

That said, use the right blade for the job. Chances are, the blade that came with your saw is a crosscut blade, and probably a cheap one at that.

There are two basic ripping blades, 24 tooth and 40 tooth. The 24T blades are usually flat top ground and are also used for plowing narrow grooves, such as drawer bottoms.

40T blades will give a smoother cut. Some are called "glue line rip".

Combo blades can also be used for ripping.

On direct drive or table saws with lower powered motors, I recommend a thin kerf blade.
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post #12 of 29 Old 08-15-2019, 10:57 AM
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I am waiting to hear from @rick from texas. Until he gives us more information, we are talking in an echo chamber.
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post #13 of 29 Old 08-15-2019, 01:12 PM
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Yes, a splitter is necessary for some rip cuts!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Packard View Post
Do you have a splitter on your saw? Wet lumber will close up and bind on the lumber. It is also a kick back risk. If you don't have a splitter, then cut as far as feeds easily and turn off the saw and then hammer in a shim to spread the material.

But a splitter is best. If you took off the splitter (along with the guard), put it back in place and try again.

I recently attempted to rip a 1" X 12" Oak board in two pieces, but only got about 10" down the length when the kerf closed on the splitter and it would not feed any further. Had there been no splitter on the saw, it would have been a kickback. So, to proceed, I drove a tiny wood wedge into the kerf which opened it up enough to complete the cut. I keep a small wedge right on the fence just for those rare times this happens.


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #14 of 29 Old 08-16-2019, 09:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
I recently attempted to rip a 1" X 12" Oak board in two pieces, but only got about 10" down the length when the kerf closed on the splitter and it would not feed any further. Had there been no splitter on the saw, it would have been a kickback. So, to proceed, I drove a tiny wood wedge into the kerf which opened it up enough to complete the cut. I keep a small wedge right on the fence just for those rare times this happens.

I had that identical issue (and I dealt with it the exact same way) when I had to rip a 2" x 8" piece of pressure treated lumber. Not only did it close up on the blade it was "wet" and caused a lot of resistance in cutting.
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post #15 of 29 Old 08-16-2019, 12:01 PM
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I also faced this problem few weeks ago then took suggestion form one of my friend to use table saw having few teethes it cuts it perfectly with less effort of-course as the teeth is reduced and you can make more movement for and back easily makes cutting easy
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post #16 of 29 Old 08-16-2019, 05:32 PM
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The KEY to Rick's problem is the "treated" lumber. Virtually guaranteed to be wet, full of stress and a total PIA to work. With a low powered saw use a "rip blade" I. E. flat top with teeth wider at the top than at the plate and very few teeth. 12 to 24 teeth?? Like suggested, stop the saw in the cut and dive a wooden wedge to open the kerf. You may need to do that several time on a long cut. Keep the riving blade in place to reduce kick back chances. Do not try to use a straight line rip blade on a weak saw. Because of their design they are using the side of the teeth to shave the kerf smooth. It takes power, lots of power! A 3hp table saw won't cut it, tried it. We have a small straight line rip saw. 12" blade, chain fed, 15hp, max feed rate 99'/min. Slow by industry standards.
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post #17 of 29 Old 08-21-2019, 03:54 PM Thread Starter
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born in Texas

I was born in Odessa, but currently live in the country outside of Normangee.
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post #18 of 29 Old 08-22-2019, 12:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rick from texas View Post
I was born in Odessa, but currently live in the country outside of Normangee.
That's very nice, @rick from texas.

Would you care to respond to everyone's requests for more information about your rip cutting problem or were you planning to ignore them, as you have been doing for an entire week?

At the very least, you could say "thank you" to all the people who gave freely of their time trying to help you answer your question.
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post #19 of 29 Old 08-22-2019, 06:57 AM
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another option to try is to raise the blade. with fewer teeth in the wood, the blade will run cooler and burn less
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post #20 of 29 Old 08-22-2019, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimPa View Post
another option to try is to raise the blade. with fewer teeth in the wood, the blade will run cooler and burn less
That might help. However I make it a practice to limit the amount of blade showing above the stock to minimize any safety issues. I am reluctant to have a lot of blade showing above the stock.
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