Removing Wood Stain from Cement - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 05-26-2020, 12:54 PM Thread Starter
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Removing Wood Stain from Cement

I am an amateur wood refinisher. I have been working on oxidizing a wood tray with a steel wool and vinegar solution, which makes kind of a more natural wood stain. However, I had an accident and spilled a bunch of the solution (stain) on my cement outside. I tried removing it with naptha and mineral spirits, and neither worked. Any ideas?
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post #2 of 9 Old 05-26-2020, 06:38 PM
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oxalic acid is good on iron stains.
boric acid is used as a concrete cleaner.
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post #3 of 9 Old 05-26-2020, 07:22 PM
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A poultice might work. It's a paste that you apply and let sit for a while and it sucks up the stain. I've seen it remove stains from marble I thought were permanent.


https://www.homedepot.com/p/Miracle-...1-LB/100672947


There are a couple of other products that come to mind. One is called FSR - Fiberglass Stain Remover. I used to say that it makes anything white. It's powerful, harsh stuff that will remove any stain from fiberglass, so it might work for concrete also.


https://www.amazon.com/Davis-Instrum...XPHSB0T9CD5MQS


There's also this stuff called MaryKate's On and Off. If left on a boat trailer, it will eat the galvanizing off in short order, but it removes stains in heartbeat. You spray it on, watch the stain fade then wash it off. I guess that's why it's called On and Off. Again, powerful stuff; don't let it get on metal, especially aluminum.

https://www.amazon.com/MaryKate-Off-...9ZW8K0078FHPNZ


Last is time. If it's in the sun, the sun will eventually bleach it out.
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post #4 of 9 Old 05-26-2020, 08:19 PM
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I would try oxalic acid as mentioned
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post #5 of 9 Old 05-26-2020, 08:41 PM
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For tough iron stains muriatic sacid will go the job. However, SAFETY IS A MUST with this high potency acid. Be sure to read all the safety material. Do not breath or get on your skin.


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post #6 of 9 Old 05-26-2020, 09:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicole Tedrow View Post
I am an amateur wood refinisher. I have been working on oxidizing a wood tray with a steel wool and vinegar solution, which makes kind of a more natural wood stain. However, I had an accident and spilled a bunch of the solution (stain) on my cement outside. I tried removing it with naptha and mineral spirits, and neither worked. Any ideas?
BTW, Im guessing you spilled the stain on concrete since cement is the adhesive ingredient that gets mixed In with sand and stone that results in concrete.

Muriatic acid is probably the only way to remove the stain but might not do so completely since concrete is very porous.
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post #7 of 9 Old 05-26-2020, 11:34 PM
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BE CAREFUL cleaning with any kind of acid, always add it to water not the other way around.

It's so easy to forget when you're working with muriatic acid and a hose.

Quote:
Do like an otter, add acid to water.

Mnemonic Device:
  • Do like an otter, add acid to water.
  • Do what you Oughter, add acid to water!
  • Acid to Water, All is Well. Water to Acid, What an Accident!
  • If you’re doing what you oughter,
    Add the acid to to the water.
    May your rest be long and placid,
    Adding water to the acid.
Explanation: To remember the order, for chemistry, when combining acid and water. That it is OK to add acid to water. But you may get an explosion, from the excess heat created by reversing the order, when mixing the two.
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post #8 of 9 Old 05-27-2020, 06:51 AM
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Before using Muriatic acid read up on it, I've used it to etch concrete before applying a finish. It is pretty nasty stuff, personally I would use it as a last resort.
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post #9 of 9 Old 05-27-2020, 07:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redeared View Post
Before using Muriatic acid read up on it, I've used it to etch concrete before applying a finish. It is pretty nasty stuff, personally I would use it as a last resort.
Its strength and potency is determined by the water ratio so you can start out with a very diluted mix and add strength as needed.

It been used by mason for years cleaning freshly laid brick to remove dried mortar from the exposed surface. Obviously you need to be careful when using any kind of acid or harmful materials.
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