Removing studs nailed into concrete basement floor - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 4Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #21 of 42 Old 06-30-2018, 09:44 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 219
View Onefreetexan's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfgang953 View Post
... and where exactly would you put an oil tank?
Outdoors,.....many states have outlawed them inside.
Onefreetexan is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 42 Old 06-30-2018, 10:07 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: South Centeral PA
Posts: 230
View wolfgang953's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onefreetexan View Post
Outdoors,.....many states have outlawed them inside.

i have never once heard of such a thing. Iv never even heard of a down side to having them inside other then taking up space.


However iv heard plenty of issues with out door tanks, from condensation on the inside of the tank, the condensation causing bacterial microbe formation in there. That and the temps causing it to gel up.. etc
wolfgang953 is offline  
post #23 of 42 Old 07-01-2018, 06:42 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,323
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
You have never heard of a downside of keeping flamnable liquids inside your house?


George
GeorgeC is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #24 of 42 Old 07-01-2018, 08:53 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
I wouldn't worry too much about a fuel oil tank. While it would be better to have the tank outside the fuel is more similar diesel. Sparks from the grinder won't ignite the fuel. You would pretty much need a house fire before it would be a problem and then it would make it more difficult to put out the house fire if the fuel was heated enough to burst the tank.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #25 of 42 Old 07-01-2018, 12:01 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: South Centeral PA
Posts: 230
View wolfgang953's Photo Album My Photos
oil is process differently now then it was way back when. You can take a light match and pump it right into the fuel tank and the only thing that will happen is the match will go out. It wont ignite the oil. Besides, even it it were the case, the spark would have to penetrate though the tank itself and still be effective enough to hit the oil.
wolfgang953 is offline  
post #26 of 42 Old 07-01-2018, 01:53 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Troy Michigan USA
Posts: 1,188
View gmercer_48083's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
I'm late to the conversation but you might try running a metal cutting sawzall blade under the bottom plate and try to cut off the nails. Chances are concrete nails were used and they are about as hard as the blade so you would find out quick if that would work or not.
Powder actuated nails are too hard to cut with sawzall blades. They can be cut flush with a grinder though.
gmercer_48083 is offline  
post #27 of 42 Old 07-01-2018, 03:27 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,651
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
Did you have the house inspected before purchasing, if not I would check local regulations regarding the oil tank, if it has to be removed might be easier to do it now than later.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
http://woodworkerglossary.com
FrankC is online now  
post #28 of 42 Old 07-01-2018, 04:17 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: South Centeral PA
Posts: 230
View wolfgang953's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
Did you have the house inspected before purchasing, if not I would check local regulations regarding the oil tank, if it has to be removed might be easier to do it now than later.

of course i had it inspected. They never mentioned a word about it. Nor have i ever heard a word about indoor ones being any sort of problem at all until this thread.
wolfgang953 is offline  
post #29 of 42 Old 07-01-2018, 05:04 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,323
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
You might want to read these regulation summary.


George
GeorgeC is online now  
post #30 of 42 Old 07-01-2018, 06:45 PM
Senior Member
 
TomCT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 1,335
View TomCT2's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfgang953 View Post
of course i had it inspected. They never mentioned a word about it. Nor have i ever heard a word about indoor ones being any sort of problem at all until this thread.

that's because no such regulation exists for residential installations.
the EPA Best Practices recommends indoor installation.
TomCT2 is offline  
post #31 of 42 Old 07-01-2018, 06:57 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfgang953 View Post
of course i had it inspected. They never mentioned a word about it. Nor have i ever heard a word about indoor ones being any sort of problem at all until this thread.
It might put an end to this argument if you would tell us the general area where you are. A lot of the country is fine with indoor storage tanks where some areas are not. You certainly are not alone having a fuel oil tank in your basement.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #32 of 42 Old 07-01-2018, 07:00 PM
The Nut in the Cellar
 
Jim Frye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Northwest Ohio
Posts: 1,033
View Jim Frye's Photo Album My Photos
The previous owner of my previous home also nailed the wall base 2x4s to the concrete floor with the square concrete nails. Some I was able to pull with a long crowbar, some broke the heads off proud of the floor. I ground the proud ones off with with grinding stones in an electric drill. Slow, but it worked. I filled the small craters around each nail with Top n' Bond, troweling it as level with the existing floor as possible. After it cured, I sanded each spot with my ROS and 80 grit disks. That got things smooth enough for any follow up work.

Jim Frye
I've gone out to find myself. If I return before I get back, have me wait for me.
"Sawdust is Man Glitter"
Jim Frye is offline  
post #33 of 42 Old 07-01-2018, 07:18 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: South Centeral PA
Posts: 230
View wolfgang953's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
It might put an end to this argument if you would tell us the general area where you are. A lot of the country is fine with indoor storage tanks where some areas are not. You certainly are not alone having a fuel oil tank in your basement.
PA, previously NJ. never heard a word in either state.



Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCT2 View Post
that's because no such regulation exists for residential installations.
the EPA Best Practices recommends indoor installation.
Thats the odd thing. It was mentioned here, and i had a select person or to mention it else where since i asked about it. But so far i havnt gotten any reasons as to why an indoor tank would be bad. Its not like you can set them on fire through normal means. They are out of the elements and the microbial issues, condensation, and slug issues that can cause... indoor seems like a good idea to me. And thats the vast majority of what iv seen my whole life. Its actually insanely rare that i see one outside.
wolfgang953 is offline  
post #34 of 42 Old 07-01-2018, 11:31 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfgang953 View Post
PA, previously NJ. never heard a word in either state.




Thats the odd thing. It was mentioned here, and i had a select person or to mention it else where since i asked about it. But so far i havnt gotten any reasons as to why an indoor tank would be bad. Its not like you can set them on fire through normal means. They are out of the elements and the microbial issues, condensation, and slug issues that can cause... indoor seems like a good idea to me. And thats the vast majority of what iv seen my whole life. Its actually insanely rare that i see one outside.
Here is a company you could have an home heating oil storage tank installed now in Pennsylvania. http://www.combinedenergyservices.com/oiltank
What you have is not something somebody jury rigged or is something no longer acceptable to current codes. It is an acceptable practice there.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #35 of 42 Old 07-02-2018, 06:35 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,943
View Quickstep's Photo Album My Photos
Just make sure your tank has a fill alarm. The fill alarm makes the vent make a whistling sound as the tank is being filled from outside. The whistle stops when the tank is full and the operator knows to stop filling the tank preventing it from overflowing from the vent or gauge.

The horror stories Iíve heard about indoor tanks are about indoor tanks that have been removed, but the piping left in place. The oil company comes, hooks up to the fill and begins dumping fuel into the basement. You canít get that smell out ever.
Quickstep is online now  
post #36 of 42 Old 07-02-2018, 07:00 AM
Senior Member
 
allpurpose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 1,507
View allpurpose's Photo Album My Photos
If those nails do come out you probably ought to clean up the holes good with some muratic acid then fill them up with vinyl concrete. If not chop em off, grind down as far as reasonable and still do the muratic acid and vinyl on top to seal out any moisture. (ever heard of concrete bugs? lol)
I worked with a company that did water proofing of basements. We ground off every crack, even used a hammer drill to chip a lot of cracked wall back a bit and filled the gaps with vinyl..It worked pretty darn good..A few walls had cracked all the way out to the dirt on the outside and we packed the vinyl in and sealed it good with some concrete sealer..
They kind of went to extremes and flooded the outside with a fire hose and no leaks.. I don't know how far you want to go, but it's a lot of work sealing up every little crack in a basement foundation wall.. I spent the entire summer in one basement.. Yeah...I can't say I miss that job all that much.. lol

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
allpurpose is online now  
post #37 of 42 Old 07-02-2018, 12:36 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 2,950
View TimPa's Photo Album My Photos
make sure your downspouts are taking your roof water away from house, and your ground slopes away from house in all directions. may have to run a dehumidifier in basement, full time. do you see water in basement? during/after rain?


just pull up sill plate, the nails may pull out easy. cut off what doesn't, patch as required.
TimPa is offline  
post #38 of 42 Old 07-02-2018, 01:24 PM
Senior Member
 
Pirate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 1,886
View Pirate's Photo Album My Photos
if you can find one of those old style nail pullers that has two jaws that grab the work when you pry on it and then it has a slide hammer to pull the nail out it may pull it out without cratering the concrete if the plate is still there while you do it, to hold the concrete.
Pirate is offline  
post #39 of 42 Old 07-02-2018, 02:01 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: South Centeral PA
Posts: 230
View wolfgang953's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
The horror stories Iíve heard about indoor tanks are about indoor tanks that have been removed, but the piping left in place. The oil company comes, hooks up to the fill and begins dumping fuel into the basement. You canít get that smell out ever.
That would truly suck ill admit... I dont even know how you would go about cleaning that up.



Quote:
Originally Posted by TimPa View Post
make sure your downspouts are taking your roof water away from house, and your ground slopes away from house in all directions. may have to run a dehumidifier in basement, full time. do you see water in basement? during/after rain?
I figured it would need a dehumidifier. It get way to high % down there.

I do see water in there after rain, but in a different way then before. When i first got here it was coming in to the half im trying to finish up. Likely though the old window and bad gutters. But both have been replaced last summer/fall and i have not seen any water since.

However, on the other side, behind the room and behind that oil tank near the far corner is the well tank. Whoever installed it ran a pipe through the wall out to the well pump and put the electrical cord in there. But they did not seal the pipe at either end. (or its worn away. Im not digging it up to check) So when it rains, the ground water does seek in through that pipe. But that can be taken care of. And much better then a foundation leak.

If it matters, next to the water tank, in the corner itself is the sump pump. Always some water in there as it only drains it down so far. It need replaced one day, but most things are out of my budget right now.
wolfgang953 is offline  
post #40 of 42 Old 07-02-2018, 02:58 PM
Senior Member
 
TomCT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 1,335
View TomCT2's Photo Album My Photos
not sure you'll want to hear this, but . . .


the walls are block. it is exceedingly common that block walls crack and water fills up the blocks. when the blocks can not / do not drain at the bottom, you get a 'water pyramid' - to the point you can have water squirting out cracks/holes. very untidy.



in the pix I see the paint flaking off on the bottom course(s?) of block. that is a pretty sure indication there is standing water in the block. I see the floor is about 1/2 the very bottom course - the usual construction is to break holes in the first course of block on the inside so water can drain under the slab into (hopefully) piping and sump. it is rare that this works 100%; it is very common than some block were skipped or got clogged with concrete from the floor pour or lots and lots of silt sifting into the block from the exterior.
TomCT2 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking for advice on removing concrete stain Sleeper Off Topic 1 06-13-2018 11:33 PM
Platform on concrete floor mcoleman Design & Plans 9 09-08-2017 07:44 AM
Can I Level This Out Somehow? (Concrete Question- Shop Floor) Crick07 Off Topic 8 12-29-2015 07:55 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome