Remounting an old mirror - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 08-23-2019, 10:14 AM Thread Starter
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Remounting an old mirror

We bought an antique oak dresser that had a framed, beveled oval mirror on the back. It was in bad shape and we had it re silvered. The mirror was backed by a piece of corrugated cardboard followed by a screwed on wood back. The edge of the mirror was centered by several pairs of wood wedges around it. It has been apart for a very long time. The screws and wedges are long gone. Are wedges still the way to go? Is silicon, wet or in cured strips, rubber balls or some more modern method better? Is corrugated still the best choice for backing? Thanks.

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post #2 of 7 Old 08-23-2019, 03:53 PM
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How deep is the rabbet on the back? The cardboard was there to provide a modicum of "cushion" for the mirror against the wood backing. You could replace that with corrugated again, or even foamboard (1/8"). When I put items into a frame, I normally secure with frame points https://www.unitedmfrs.com/Fletcher_...r_p/f07700.htm but small finishing nails driven paralell(ish) to the mirror would even do. How much play is there with the mirror inside the rabbet? Shoot a photo if you've got it.
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post #3 of 7 Old 08-28-2019, 06:12 PM
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There is a specific kind of backing sheet for a mirror. I can't remember what it is called but it some kind of acid resistance (I think). Just using ordinary paper or cardboard might be what caused the mirroring silver to degrade in the first place. I would think that picture frame shops would know what I am talking about. When I had my shop, I had a gazillion phone numbers at my fingertips but not no mo.

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post #4 of 7 Old 08-28-2019, 06:24 PM
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You can use acid free foam board for the backing . . . available at Michaels/Hobby Lobby etc. I'm not sure about the degradation being caused by the backing, but the extra insurance of this isn't too expensive.
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post #5 of 7 Old 08-28-2019, 08:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScubaDoog View Post
You can use acid free foam board for the backing . . . available at Michaels/Hobby Lobby etc. I'm not sure about the degradation being caused by the backing, but the extra insurance of this isn't too expensive.
Had a frame shop for years, did many mirrors, and this is exactly what I used.
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post #6 of 7 Old 09-10-2019, 07:23 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScubaDoog View Post
How deep is the rabbet on the back? The cardboard was there to provide a modicum of "cushion" for the mirror against the wood backing. You could replace that with corrugated again, or even foamboard (1/8"). When I put items into a frame, I normally secure with frame points https://www.unitedmfrs.com/Fletcher_...r_p/f07700.htm but small finishing nails driven paralell(ish) to the mirror would even do. How much play is there with the mirror inside the rabbet? Shoot a photo if you've got it.
I like the acid free foam board but hard points for beveled glass with a silvered backing makes me a little nervous. I was hoping for something softer to center the mirror. The little wood wedge pairs don't overhang the glass. I wonder just how much seasonal give they offer. Maybe peel and stick silicon shelf bumpers cut to size might be good. Thanks to all for the suggestions. Sorry for the slow response.

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post #7 of 7 Old 09-12-2019, 04:45 PM
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This is probably a full 1/4" thick mirror or maybe thicker. Double strength mirrors are now 0.200" thick. So this mirror is likely fairly heavy.

Also the frame is going to be old and hard and may not take framing points well. I recall my framing guns (I have two, one the shoots triangles and one that shoots arrow shaped points) failing to penetrate an old decorative mirror.



Mirror offset brackets are available in various depths and can be screwed in if the points fail to penetrate
Also use mirror hangers and not screw eyes.
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